About desigining for the 'visceral design'

20 Jun 2006 - 4:37am
7 years ago
3 replies
792 reads
tmaeda
2006

Hello, I'm Toshiyuki in Japan.
I'm a junior usability consultant.

I've read Don Norman's "Emotional Design" and the related article "Personas,
Goals, and Emotional Design" at uxmatters.com.
http://www.uxmatters.com/MT/archives/000019.php

Now , I want to learn more about "Mood or Inspiration boards" or anything
else.
The primary motivation for it is I want to design for the visceral level
more logically like usability , or desigining for the behavioral level.

All thoughts welcome, thanks!

Comments

20 Jun 2006 - 8:33am
Robert Reimann
2003

Hi Toshiyuki,

As I mention in my UXMatters article, the critical starting point is
understanding the target user(s) via user models (personas). Understanding
their experience (visceral) goals in the context of their other goals and
their mental
models can help designers generate visual language studies using tools such
as mood boards:

http://www.betterproductdesign.net/tools/definition/image.htm

These, along with 3D form studies (for products involving hardware), can
help to
identify a look and feel for the product/UI that reinforces visceral
responses.

Such responses can also in theory be evaluated, using tools from
psychophysics,
such as magnitude estimation:

http://ahsmail.uwaterloo.ca/kin356/magest/magest.htm

Robert.

--

Robert Reimann
President, IxDA

Manager, User Experience
Bose Corporation
Framingham, MA

On 6/20/06, maeda toshiyuki <t.maenad at gmail.com > wrote:
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> Hello, I'm Toshiyuki in Japan.
> I'm a junior usability consultant.
>
> I've read Don Norman's "Emotional Design" and the related article
> "Personas,
> Goals, and Emotional Design" at uxmatters.com .
> http://www.uxmatters.com/MT/archives/000019.php
>
> Now , I want to learn more about "Mood or Inspiration boards" or anything
> else.
> The primary motivation for it is I want to design for the visceral level
> more logically like usability , or desigining for the behavioral level.
>
> All thoughts welcome, thanks!
>

--

Robert Reimann
President, IxDA

Manager, User Experience
Bose Corporation
Framingham, MA

20 Jun 2006 - 10:11am
Dan Saffer
2003

I have used mood boards in the past. What I've found is:

1. Don't make mood boards too complicated or needing to be
intellectually understood. They should be raw and provoke a visceral
response like some abstract pieces of art.

2. Put the mood board up on a wall where you can always glance at it
while designing.

3. Adding your own photos to the mix (in addition to the usual cut
outs from magazines) is a great way to make it personal.

4. I bet Flickr would be a great place to find images for mood boards
too.

Dan

Dan Saffer
Designing for Interaction
New Riders, August 2006
http://www.designingforinteraction.com

21 Jun 2006 - 11:35am
tmaeda
2006

Thanks a lot for your rapid responses!
I've realized very well the need to learn a lot.

>2. Put the mood board up on a wall where you can always glance at it
>while designing.
>
>
I think mood boards is helpful for brainstoming about a rough design
policy on how graphics should affect users.
But how should I determine if a designer's output will correctly affect
target users ?
It's maybe ever impossible.
Do I just have to determine it with heuristic approach ?

--
t.maenad �� gmail.com
Toshiyuki Maeda
a junior usablity consultant

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