Now Hiring Leonardo DaVinci?

28 Sep 2006 - 5:59am
8 years ago
28 replies
1025 reads
jbellis
2005

Bottom-line question: "As our rapidly increasing technology produces more
multi-powered individuals, are companies any more justified in trying to
hire artists who also code?"

I've always been fascinated by ads for someone who can do both graphic
design and, in his or her spare time "reengineer our world-wide network
topology" (loose allusion to an old Dilbert). Below is a reduced version of
the ad that prompted this. I particularly like the juxtaposition of "B/A
degree... illustration...Ajax... Extreme Programming Practices." I
understand that on this list, a few (10? 100? 1000?) such marvels exist. And
I understand that small companies are, well, small, and many of us in orgs
of all size contribute to all roles in some regard.

But I've always considered it idiotic to expect to have your branding done
by your ASP guy, and we all know this is probably under US$50K. I'd advise
any small company to use an agency of some sort if they need Leonardo, but
that's not my question. My question is, with our newer, very talented young
folks, is this becoming a more realistic expectation of them and/or the
employee market??? I'm doubtful.

Thanks,
www.jackbellis.com

Required:
Ability to develop web site graphics from scratch
Experience with ... ASP scripting.
Bachelor of Art (B/A) degree in Graphic/Web Design .

Ideal:

Ability to create illustrations
Experience with coding in JavaScript and using Ajax
Experience with print design and color separation
Experience creating brand identities

Responsibilities

Design print ads, online ads, and associated site landing pages under tight
deadlines.
Design, code, and standardize landing page,using HTML, CSS, and ASP.
Engage in detailed quality assurance activities that include proofing copy
Maintain internal documentation
Assisting with creation of brand identity materials.
Adhere to Extreme Programming practices
Collaborate with vendors and outside parties as needed for support or design
initiatives.

Comments

28 Sep 2006 - 6:30am
Mark Schraad
2006

I completely agree. Most of these ads are looking for the omni guy - or super flexible multi talented guy. Is the fear of HR that they don't really know how to assess and hire a good designer? Might they not get approval for spending a decent amount on a mere designer? If they through some production or development utility they might just get this hire approved?

It is curious to me the pressure being put on seasoned interactive or experience designers that do not have a masters degree, yet have 10 years expereince doing it right.

But I also understand the struggles of the small firm. Hiring a full time person is sometimes a challenge - when you only have a half a person worth of work, yet you want a long term profession that really knows their stuff.

Mark Schraad

On Thursday, September 28, 2006, at 08:01AM, jackbellis.com <jackbellis at hotmail.com> wrote:

>[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
>Bottom-line question: "As our rapidly increasing technology produces more
>multi-powered individuals, are companies any more justified in trying to
>hire artists who also code?"
>
>I've always been fascinated by ads for someone who can do both graphic
>design and, in his or her spare time "reengineer our world-wide network
>topology" (loose allusion to an old Dilbert). Below is a reduced version of
>the ad that prompted this. I particularly like the juxtaposition of "B/A
>degree... illustration...Ajax... Extreme Programming Practices." I
>understand that on this list, a few (10? 100? 1000?) such marvels exist. And
>I understand that small companies are, well, small, and many of us in orgs
>of all size contribute to all roles in some regard.
>
>But I've always considered it idiotic to expect to have your branding done
>by your ASP guy, and we all know this is probably under US$50K. I'd advise
>any small company to use an agency of some sort if they need Leonardo, but
>that's not my question. My question is, with our newer, very talented young
>folks, is this becoming a more realistic expectation of them and/or the
>employee market??? I'm doubtful.
>
>Thanks,
>www.jackbellis.com
>
>Required:
>Ability to develop web site graphics from scratch
>Experience with ... ASP scripting.
>Bachelor of Art (B/A) degree in Graphic/Web Design .
>
>Ideal:
>
>Ability to create illustrations
>Experience with coding in JavaScript and using Ajax
>Experience with print design and color separation
>Experience creating brand identities
>
>
>Responsibilities
>
>Design print ads, online ads, and associated site landing pages under tight
>deadlines.
>Design, code, and standardize landing page,using HTML, CSS, and ASP.
>Engage in detailed quality assurance activities that include proofing copy
>Maintain internal documentation
>Assisting with creation of brand identity materials.
>Adhere to Extreme Programming practices
>Collaborate with vendors and outside parties as needed for support or design
>initiatives.
>
>________________________________________________________________
>Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
>List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
>(Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
>Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
>Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
>Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
>Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>
>

28 Sep 2006 - 7:59am
mtumi
2004

This actually seems pretty reasonable compared to some of the other
postings I've seen.

:-)

On Sep 28, 2006, at 7:59 AM, jackbellis.com wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> Bottom-line question: "As our rapidly increasing technology
> produces more
> multi-powered individuals, are companies any more justified in
> trying to
> hire artists who also code?"
>
> I've always been fascinated by ads for someone who can do both graphic
> design and, in his or her spare time "reengineer our world-wide
> network
> topology" (loose allusion to an old Dilbert). Below is a reduced
> version of
> the ad that prompted this. I particularly like the juxtaposition of
> "B/A
> degree... illustration...Ajax... Extreme Programming Practices." I
> understand that on this list, a few (10? 100? 1000?) such marvels
> exist. And
> I understand that small companies are, well, small, and many of us
> in orgs
> of all size contribute to all roles in some regard.
>
> But I've always considered it idiotic to expect to have your
> branding done
> by your ASP guy, and we all know this is probably under US$50K. I'd
> advise
> any small company to use an agency of some sort if they need
> Leonardo, but
> that's not my question. My question is, with our newer, very
> talented young
> folks, is this becoming a more realistic expectation of them and/or
> the
> employee market??? I'm doubtful.
>
> Thanks,
> www.jackbellis.com
>
> Required:
> Ability to develop web site graphics from scratch
> Experience with ... ASP scripting.
> Bachelor of Art (B/A) degree in Graphic/Web Design .
>
> Ideal:
>
> Ability to create illustrations
> Experience with coding in JavaScript and using Ajax
> Experience with print design and color separation
> Experience creating brand identities
>
>
> Responsibilities
>
> Design print ads, online ads, and associated site landing pages
> under tight
> deadlines.
> Design, code, and standardize landing page,using HTML, CSS, and ASP.
> Engage in detailed quality assurance activities that include
> proofing copy
> Maintain internal documentation
> Assisting with creation of brand identity materials.
> Adhere to Extreme Programming practices
> Collaborate with vendors and outside parties as needed for support
> or design
> initiatives.
>
> _

28 Sep 2006 - 11:27am
Leslie Chicoine
2006

I actually sit next to this guy ;)
I don't see this as a "jack of all trades". Both subjects, graphic design
and front end development, are very closely linked in the work process. They
each have their own rules and tools, but the underlying fundamentals and
perspectives are the same (how does it look, does it convey the proper
intent?).

I do interaction design and concept development, and would like to learn
more programming. I see a bigger disconnect here because the scale and
perspectives are very different and I would, for example, have to turn off
the pragmatic programmers view when trying to blue sky out ideas and see
different user perspectives etc...

Interesting subject, thanks for bringing it up!
What skill sets don't connect together? It seems that any combination is
reasonable so long as the person can be properly immersed in both. Thoughts?

-Leslie-

28 Sep 2006 - 11:44am
Vishal Subraman...
2005

I have a background in programming (now exclusively do Ixd), so have worked
on many projects doing both. The biggest prb I faced in such roles was when
there was a conflict of interest. While the designer in me wanted to build
the best experience possible, the programmer in me didn't want designs that
would be complicated to build. Programming can be really complex and it is
my observation that programmers don't see problems in fudging designs when
say they have to build a custom function to accomodate the recommended
design, but can use prefab ones for an alternative (not necessarily better)
design.

A gig I did in a startup involved working on the Ixd and leading a team of
developers. This worked out really well because I was able to understand
the issues developers faced in implementing the designs (which others
didn't, and this was causing problems between the teams). Scale is obviously
a big factor...this was a team of <10 people (design+ dev). When larger
teams are involved, I don't think this would work...thats the team leaders
role, and of course it would help if s/he had an idea of everything thats
going on.

-Vishal

On 9/28/06, Leslie Chicoine <theinfonaut at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> I actually sit next to this guy ;)
> I don't see this as a "jack of all trades". Both subjects, graphic design
> and front end development, are very closely linked in the work process.
> They
> each have their own rules and tools, but the underlying fundamentals and
> perspectives are the same (how does it look, does it convey the proper
> intent?).
>
> I do interaction design and concept development, and would like to learn
> more programming. I see a bigger disconnect here because the scale and
> perspectives are very different and I would, for example, have to turn off
> the pragmatic programmers view when trying to blue sky out ideas and see
> different user perspectives etc...
>
> Interesting subject, thanks for bringing it up!
> What skill sets don't connect together? It seems that any combination is
> reasonable so long as the person can be properly immersed in both.
> Thoughts?
>
> -Leslie-
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

28 Sep 2006 - 12:00pm
Jupiter Barton
2006

I see both sides of the issue. Small companies obviously need to have
multi-talented people, even if their secondary skill set is,
well...secondary. That being said, the best work will most likely come
from someone who spends most of their energy on one aspect of the process.
I think that a lot of ads are shooting for the moon, and their true
expecatations are a little more grounded in reality.

It's great if a designer understands some of the limitations of
development and considers how projects may come to life, or at least be
able to have a conversation with a dev about what is feasible. Again this
is especially important in small companies, where budgets tend to be
smaller and more critical.

Blue sky options are fun to explore, but most of the time they are not
feasible within time and budget constraints. It's not going to do a small
company much good if time is spent on blue sky options that don't have a
chance of becoming reality.

Jupiter Barton
http://www.jupiterbarton.com

28 Sep 2006 - 12:12pm
Matt Attaway
2004

The degree I'm currently finishing is actually made to produce people like
this, albeit for the games industry. Our curriculum is about half
art/design classes and half coding classes. I've been impressed how many
of the students become fairly accomplished in both sides of the program.

Matt

28 Sep 2006 - 12:18pm
Dave Rogers
2006

Not to toot my own horn too much... I wrote a column on this topic for
<http://www.gotomedia.com/>gotomedia last year. You might find it interesting:

http://www.gotomedia.com/gotoreport/october2005/news_1005_fit.html

Dave Rogers
Principal/User Experience Specialist
UXCentric, Inc.
http://www.uxcentric.com
818.415.2961 : phone
208.723.0524 : fax

28 Sep 2006 - 12:45pm
Josh Seiden
2003

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Joshua Seiden [mailto:joshseiden at yahoo.com]
> Sent: Thursday, September 28, 2006 11:23 AM
> To: 'discuss at ixda.org'
> Subject: RE: [IxDA Discuss] Now Hiring Leonardo DaVinci?
>
>
> Justified? Don't know. Practical? No.
>
> Here's how I would like to see this ad worded:
>
> ---------
>
> "We're a small company with a small budget. We'd like to hire
> one really smart person with a range of talents who can grow
> with us. Here are the collection of skills we would like to
> add to our team:
>
> -- art wrestling
> -- code cooking
> -- sales chomping
> -- etc, etc...
>
> If you are flexible, smart, and have some combination of the
> skills above, please apply."
>
> -------
>
> That would tell me that they understood the problem. Ads like
> the one cited below tell me the company either doesn't
> understand, or can't express that understanding.
>
> JS
>
>
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> > [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On
> > Behalf Of jackbellis.com
> > Sent: Thursday, September 28, 2006 7:59 AM
> > To: discuss at ixda.org
> > Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Now Hiring Leonardo DaVinci?
> >
> >
> > Bottom-line question: "As our rapidly increasing technology
> > produces more
> > multi-powered individuals, are companies any more justified
> > in trying to
> > hire artists who also code?"
>

28 Sep 2006 - 1:47pm
cfmdesigns
2004

>I completely agree. Most of these ads are looking for the omni guy - or
>super flexible multi talented guy. Is the fear of HR that they don't really
>know how to assess and hire a good designer? Might they not get
>approval for spending a decent amount on a mere designer? If they
>through some production or development utility they might just get this
>hire approved?

Sometimes it's just HR ridiculousness.

"We need to cover all these tasks": really means "Hire someone to do most of this, and we'll distribute the rest around the group", but all the tasks get posted in one description, resulting in an impossible-to-fill position.

"We need to hire someone like Jim": in one position I was in, they wanted to hire another Senior QA Engineer, but they didn't quite have a job description and requirements, so they mirrored the skills I had brought to the table a year before, when the Senior position was created for me. Resulting description said "eight and a half years experience required".

-- Jim
Seattle

28 Sep 2006 - 2:44pm
jbellis
2005

Matt,
Wow. I'd say that your answer alone validates that "yes, they are
justified," irrespective of the numbers. I guess it was just a matter of
time.
By extrapolation, I guess by the year 2050, a typical worker might have to
ask oneself... "hmmm, do I want to go to my job as a statesman,
neuro-chemical engineer, or concert violinist today?"
-Jack
----- Original Message -----
From: "Matt Attaway" <matt at perforce.com>

> The degree I'm currently finishing is actually made to produce people like
> this, albeit for the games industry. Our curriculum is about half
> art/design classes and half coding classes. I've been impressed how many
> of the students become fairly accomplished in both sides of the program.
>

28 Sep 2006 - 3:01pm
Sean Voisen
2006

There are two things I find interesting about this ad:

1) They ask for someone with a BA in graphic design and experience with ASP
coding.
2) They ask for someone who can create original illustrations.

As for point #1: The BA in design requirement is silly. Who cares what the
degree is in? It's just as likely a person with a comp sci background can
design as well as a person with a graphic design background can program.
Education only tells you what the primary skillset emphasis is.

And then we come to point #2. While there are plenty of good designers who
are also secondarily artists, and could actually create great original
illustrations, you're more likely to find an artist who is also a good
designer. But my experience is that people with a primary skillset in
art/illustration do not also write code.

My view is that in the spectrum from technical to pure creative, design is
in the middle with art and programming on either side. (Not that programming
isn't creative, but it's creativity with objective goals vs. subjective for
art.) Design is the bridge between the two sides, and people tend to sit on
one side or the other of that middle ground.

So, though rare, I think you can find good designers/programmers (I'm one),
or good designers/artists, but a good designer/artist/programmer will be
even harder to find.

- Sean

Sean Voisen
Interactive Design Technologist
http://seanvoisen.com

28 Sep 2006 - 5:01pm
jbellis
2005

Jupiter,
You're addressing an important angle, but one different than what's
troubling me. Yes, designers (in any discipline: graphic, interaction,
usability, database, industrial) need to be technologists enough to not ask
Engineering for designs that are wholy impractical. My conern is about
overtly expecting aesthetic sensibilities---passion, actually---in someone
who also thrives on the engineering.

I know there are many who bridge the divide... but I don't think many
artists thrive on the engineering to the extent required by today's
demanding tech circumstances.

Regards, Jack

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jupiter Barton" <jb at jupiterbarton.com>
>
> I see both sides of the issue. Small companies obviously need to have
> multi-talented people, even if their secondary skill set is,
> well...secondary. That being said, the best work will most likely come
> from someone who spends most of their energy on one aspect of the process.
> I think that a lot of ads are shooting for the moon, and their true
> expecatations are a little more grounded in reality.
>
> It's great if a designer understands some of the limitations of
> development and considers how projects may come to life, or at least be

28 Sep 2006 - 6:48pm
jbellis
2005

OK, now we're getting somewhere. Esteban, I would not for one moment—and did not in my original post—suggest that "one should (!) be the main skill." I'm not trying to limit any of the world's renaissance persons. I'm talking about employers and employment.

But here's what I want to ask you about:

Is it the case that you "prefer" art and design
or that you just plain have more talent and
motivation for those activities???

Knowledge might indeed be modular, but I don't believe that art is knowledge. And just to clarify, I'm not talking about the many flavors of design that constitute the intellectual components of Ux. I'm talking about art (graphic) design vs. programming. I'm proposing that with the exception of graduates from Matt's curriculum, employers are silly—not insane, just silly—to ask for a graphic artist that codes.

-Jack

----- Original Message -----
From: Esteban Barahona
To: jackbellis.com
Sent: Thursday, September 28, 2006 8:28 PM
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Now Hiring Leonardo DaVinci?

I think that some people can design and also code, but one will usually be the main skill. I prefer art and design over coding, but my only studies are of Computer Science (I will switch to Design next year) and Free and Open Source Software is a good way to "code in our free time" (and I may do just that). But again, one should be the main skill.

There's also something to consider. Knowledge is modular. Someone can be skilled at web design and developement but not code something that is not for a web service or a script and not be able to design in 3D.

2006/9/28, jackbellis.com <jackbellis at hotmail.com>:
[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]

Bottom-line question: "As our rapidly increasing technology produces more
multi-powered individuals, are companies any more justified in trying to
hire artists who also code?"

I've always been fascinated by ads for someone who can do both graphic
design and, in his or her spare time "reengineer our world-wide network
topology" (loose allusion to an old Dilbert). Below is a reduced version of
the ad that prompted this. I particularly like the juxtaposition of "B/A
degree... illustration...Ajax... Extreme Programming Practices." I
understand that on this list, a few (10? 100? 1000?) such marvels exist. And
I understand that small companies are, well, small, and many of us in orgs
of all size contribute to all roles in some regard.

But I've always considered it idiotic to expect to have your branding done
by your ASP guy, and we all know this is probably under US$50K. I'd advise
any small company to use an agency of some sort if they need Leonardo, but
that's not my question. My question is, with our newer, very talented young
folks, is this becoming a more realistic expectation of them and/or the
employee market??? I'm doubtful.

Thanks,
www.jackbellis.com

Required:
Ability to develop web site graphics from scratch
Experience with ... ASP scripting.
Bachelor of Art (B/A) degree in Graphic/Web Design .

Ideal:

Ability to create illustrations
Experience with coding in JavaScript and using Ajax
Experience with print design and color separation
Experience creating brand identities

Responsibilities

Design print ads, online ads, and associated site landing pages under tight
deadlines.
Design, code, and standardize landing page,using HTML, CSS, and ASP.
Engage in detailed quality assurance activities that include proofing copy
Maintain internal documentation
Assisting with creation of brand identity materials.
Adhere to Extreme Programming practices
Collaborate with vendors and outside parties as needed for support or design
initiatives.

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
(Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org

28 Sep 2006 - 7:28pm
jbellis
2005

Dear Some,

I drafted several different replies to your thought provoking feedback but
none of them, though entertaining, was worthy. I thought of asking the
audience to vote on them, but a rare moment of discretion overcame me. While
I continue to work on them, let me ask you a question.

When you say "no need of time to spend it" are you saying you aren't
interested in spending time away from passionate immersion in your work? Or
are you just at the mercy of your employment and can't spend time as you
want to? If it's the latter, do you feel successful with your blessings?

And thanks too for the wishes of good luck, I'm gonna need it.
Jack

----- Original Message -----
From: "someone somewhere" <ix_da at hotmail.com>

> Hi Jack,
>
> If you want a young multi talent. Inspire and challenge. ... People with
> the right sense for commerce are never cheap.
>
> Good Luck.
>
>
> Some guy

29 Sep 2006 - 5:55am
jbellis
2005

Sean, your analysis matches mine. It will be very interesting to see if the
art/programming graduates from Matt's curriculum end up persisting as
professionals at both. Only time will tell. Small companies might appear to
benefit (or would they be better with an agency?).

There is however one thing that requires no crystal ball: every day it
becomes possible to accomplish more technology with less study. The
perpetual promise that "some day you won't even need programmers" continues
to evade businesses like a mirage moving away in the desert, eh? But even
someone like myself who doesn't thrive on the engineering was able to make
an ASP database page (for free in fact but lots of popunders; see
officeswap.com puzzleswap.com).

Significance? I believe that many artists will learn the technology (varying
amounts) just as virtually every workplace role will. Some will stop at
tools, some at Ruby on Rails, and some not until they've unsoldered the
wires on the motherboard and managed to get 1's and 0's from their
hypothalmus to the accumulator. I don't believe the converse, that art will
pervade all other disciplines, making compsci students flock to photoshop.
Instead, when they need a visual element, most will use stuff that's already
"engineered" for them.

-Jack

----- Original Message -----
From: "Sean Voisen" <sean at voisen.org>
> There are two things I find interesting about this ad:
>
> 1) They ask for someone with a BA in graphic design and experience with
> ASP
> coding.
> 2) They ask for someone who can create original illustrations.

29 Sep 2006 - 6:22am
Mark Schraad
2006

Tip Sheet: How To Hire a D-School Grad (A business Week article)

http://www.businessweek.com/playbook/06/0928_2.htm

Mark

29 Sep 2006 - 6:48am
jbellis
2005

Dave,

Great article. I'll be using the apple-orange tree analogy a lot. (In this traffic, tooting your horn is just another form of steering, right?) I see you're in LA, so the slight difference of our perspectives is just a matter of degree. In suburban Pharmadelphia, only the biggest operations are starting to distinguish the roles and tasks you enumerate.

In my job market it's not terribly unreasonable to ask one person to fill most of the tasks in between (but not including) graphic art and Java developer. He or she could be the Ux-taxonomy-usability-metadata-library sci-interaction-prototype person. No, not at the PhD level of course. To me, that might as you say be a broad sweep of skills, but not metaphysically incongruous... as I find the two extreme ends.

I can't wait 'til the next meeting when I announce I might have to farm-out the metadata!

Regards, Jack

>>>Not to toot my own horn too much... I wrote a column on this topic for
>>><http://www.gotomedia.com/>gotomedia last year. You might find it interesting:

>>>http://www.gotomedia.com/gotoreport/october2005/news_1005_fit.html

>>>>Dave Rogers
>>>Principal/User Experience Specialist
>>>UXCentric, Inc.

29 Sep 2006 - 7:49am
Jared M. Spool
2003

At 02:18 PM 9/28/2006, Dave Rogers wrote:
>Not to toot my own horn too much... I wrote a column on this topic for
><http://www.gotomedia.com/>gotomedia last year. You might find it
>interesting:
>
>http://www.gotomedia.com/gotoreport/october2005/news_1005_fit.html

While we're horn tootin':

I recently wrote this post in our blog:
Specialists vs. Generalists
http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2006/09/08/specialists-vs-generalists/

Some organizations can afford to have people who specialize in only one
discipline (thereby bringing deep experience and knowledge to the design
problems).

Others can only afford generalists (whose experience and knowledge will be
much more shallow in specific areas, but still valuable because of their
understanding of cross-area integration).

The local economy will dictate which you get to hire.

It seems unfair to me to judge an organization who can only afford
generalists as being unrealistic or unpractical. Sounds to me to be quite
the opposite.

Just because you wouldn't want to work as a generalist doesn't mean there
aren't good, qualified individuals who do.

Just my take,

Jared

Jared M. Spool, Founding Principal, User Interface Engineering
510 Turnpike Street, Suite 102, North Andover, MA 01845
978 327-5561 jspool at uie.com http://www.uie.com
Blog: http://www.uie.com/brainsparks

29 Sep 2006 - 8:25am
Máirín Duffy
2005

jackbellis.com wrote:
> There is however one thing that requires no crystal ball: every day it
> becomes possible to accomplish more technology with less study. The
> perpetual promise that "some day you won't even need programmers" continues
> to evade businesses like a mirage moving away in the desert, eh? But even
> someone like myself who doesn't thrive on the engineering was able to make
> an ASP database page

While it helps that writing computer programs is getting easier over
time, I think the statement "some day you won't even need programmers"
is not really true. I think (hope?) it's more that programming is
becoming another form of literacy.

~m

(who dual-majored in computer science and electronic art @ RPI.)

29 Sep 2006 - 10:07am
Sean Voisen
2006

> while I would disagree that there are very many people who can code and
> illustrate well, you may be one of them, judging by your site, which is a
> wonderful, effective take on what are apparently the new requirements.
>

Mary, thanks for the compliment.

My background is in computer science, but I've spent many years studying and
practicing design because it's what I'm most passionate about. I like being
a generalist. So, while I can design and also bring my designs to life
through technology, I don't think I can draw or paint or illustrate that
well at all. It's not a skill I've ever cultivated beyond simple sketching
for design work :)

And I guess that's the point: There are definitely people out there like me
who have a large subset of the skills of a Leonardo, but good luck finding
someone with those skills who can also paint the Mona Lisa.

Sean

Sean Voisen
Interaction Design Technologist
http://seanvoisen.com

29 Sep 2006 - 10:26am
Sean Voisen
2006

> While it helps that writing computer programs is getting easier over
> time, I think the statement "some day you won't even need programmers"
> is not really true. I think (hope?) it's more that programming is
> becoming another form of literacy.

I'd agree with the idea that it's becoming another form of literacy. You
have good writers and you have bad writers, just as you have good
programmers and bad programmers. Depending on the project, you will always
need programmers. Though we continue to abstract away the technical
complexity of computer programs in high level languages and visual authoring
tools, just like writing, it's one thing to know the words, but it's quite
another to be able to use the words to write an award-winning novel.

Or, just as desktop publishing brought print design to the masses, and we
are slowly doing the same with the creation of software. 50 years ago very
few people knew about fonts; today most computer users know the difference
between a serif and a sans-serif. And many of them can create decent quality
newsletters or leaflets from their inkjet printers. But you still need a
professional designer to create high quality material. Same will be true
with software.

- Sean
--
Sean Voisen
Interaction Design Technologist
http://seanvoisen.com

29 Sep 2006 - 10:13am
Wunderlich, Judith
2006

Hi Jack,

I'm a recruiter and I must admit that is the broadest, and I agree idiotic,
help wanted ad I've seen so far, and I've seen some wild ones. If a client
came to me with that request, I would counsel them on what they can
realistically expect and get, and try to change their viewpoint. If I
couldn't do that, then I would not work with them.

Judi Wunderlich
Director of Recruiting
AQUENT Chicago
773-695-9500

> I've always been fascinated by ads for someone who can do both graphic
> design and, in his or her spare time "reengineer our world-wide network
> topology" (loose allusion to an old Dilbert). Below is a reduced version
of
> the ad that prompted this. I particularly like the juxtaposition of "B/A
> degree... illustration...Ajax... Extreme Programming Practices." I
> understand that on this list, a few (10? 100? 1000?) such marvels exist.
And
> I understand that small companies are, well, small, and many of us in orgs

> of all size contribute to all roles in some regard.
>
> But I've always considered it idiotic to expect to have your branding done

> by your ASP guy, and we all know this is probably under US$50K. I'd advise

> any small company to use an agency of some sort if they need Leonardo, but

> that's not my question. My question is, with our newer, very talented
young
> folks, is this becoming a more realistic expectation of them and/or the
> employee market??? I'm doubtful.
>
> Thanks,
> www.jackbellis.com
>
> Required:
> Ability to develop web site graphics from scratch
> Experience with ... ASP scripting.
> Bachelor of Art (B/A) degree in Graphic/Web Design .
>
> Ideal:
>
> Ability to create illustrations
> Experience with coding in JavaScript and using Ajax
> Experience with print design and color separation
> Experience creating brand identities
>
> Responsibilities
>
> Design print ads, online ads, and associated site landing pages under
tight
> deadlines.
> Design, code, and standardize landing page,using HTML, CSS, and ASP.
> Engage in detailed quality assurance activities that include proofing copy

> Maintain internal documentation
> Assisting with creation of brand identity materials.
> Adhere to Extreme Programming practices
> Collaborate with vendors and outside parties as needed for support or
design
> initiatives.

1 Oct 2006 - 4:21pm
jbellis
2005

Jared,
I read your article carefully and I think we are making separate, not
conflicting points. My hypothesis is that algorithms and art are such rarely
combined skills that they are, to use your article's term,
compartmentalized.

Our differences hinge on your article's inclusion of "visual design" in the
continuum that comprises the range of general Ux. It's correct to include
it, but there's a broad sweep to visual design from relatively objective
interaction design considerations of grouping and positioning, to the other
extreme that I'm focusing on: creative synthesis and often subjective
aesthetics.

I don't feel that your analogy to physicians applies to my argument.
Specialist surgeons learn the general expertise of physiology (helpful as
you mention, even to deliver babies) but programmers do not, for instance,
learn the color wheel.

-Jack

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jared M. Spool" <jspool at uie.com>
>
> I recently wrote this post in our blog:
> Specialists vs. Generalists
> http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2006/09/08/specialists-vs-generalists/

> It seems unfair to me to judge an organization who can only afford
> generalists as being unrealistic or unpractical. Sounds to me to be quite
> the opposite.
>

1 Oct 2006 - 7:13pm
Christine Boese
2006

Why is it they would only be looking for an "omni GUY" or "a super flexible
multi-talented GUY" ??!!

No wonder women have such a hard time breaking into male dominated fields,
if recruiters and hiring agents are only looking for positions that by
definition can only be filled by men.

Chris Boese

On 9/28/06, mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> I completely agree. Most of these ads are looking for the omni guy - or
> super flexible multi talented guy. Is the fear of HR that they don't really
> know how to assess and hire a good designer? Might they not get approval for
> spending a decent amount on a mere designer? If they through some production
> or development utility they might just get this hire approved?
>
> It is curious to me the pressure being put on seasoned interactive or
> experience designers that do not have a masters degree, yet have 10 years
> expereince doing it right.
>
> But I also understand the struggles of the small firm. Hiring a full time
> person is sometimes a challenge - when you only have a half a person worth
> of work, yet you want a long term profession that really knows their stuff.
>
> Mark Schraad
>
>
> On Thursday, September 28, 2006, at 08:01AM, jackbellis.com <
> jackbellis at hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> >[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
> >
> >Bottom-line question: "As our rapidly increasing technology produces more
> >multi-powered individuals, are companies any more justified in trying to
> >hire artists who also code?"
> >
> >I've always been fascinated by ads for someone who can do both graphic
> >design and, in his or her spare time "reengineer our world-wide network
> >topology" (loose allusion to an old Dilbert). Below is a reduced version
> of
> >the ad that prompted this. I particularly like the juxtaposition of "B/A
> >degree... illustration...Ajax... Extreme Programming Practices." I
> >understand that on this list, a few (10? 100? 1000?) such marvels exist.
> And
> >I understand that small companies are, well, small, and many of us in
> orgs
> >of all size contribute to all roles in some regard.
> >
> >But I've always considered it idiotic to expect to have your branding
> done
> >by your ASP guy, and we all know this is probably under US$50K. I'd
> advise
> >any small company to use an agency of some sort if they need Leonardo,
> but
> >that's not my question. My question is, with our newer, very talented
> young
> >folks, is this becoming a more realistic expectation of them and/or the
> >employee market??? I'm doubtful.
> >
> >Thanks,
> >www.jackbellis.com
> >
> >Required:
> >Ability to develop web site graphics from scratch
> >Experience with ... ASP scripting.
> >Bachelor of Art (B/A) degree in Graphic/Web Design .
> >
> >Ideal:
> >
> >Ability to create illustrations
> >Experience with coding in JavaScript and using Ajax
> >Experience with print design and color separation
> >Experience creating brand identities
> >
> >
> >Responsibilities
> >
> >Design print ads, online ads, and associated site landing pages under
> tight
> >deadlines.
> >Design, code, and standardize landing page,using HTML, CSS, and ASP.
> >Engage in detailed quality assurance activities that include proofing
> copy
> >Maintain internal documentation
> >Assisting with creation of brand identity materials.
> >Adhere to Extreme Programming practices
> >Collaborate with vendors and outside parties as needed for support or
> design
> >initiatives.
> >
> >________________________________________________________________
> >Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> >To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> >List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> >List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> >(Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> >Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> >Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> >Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> >Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
> >
> >
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

--
christine boese
www.serendipit-e.com

1 Oct 2006 - 8:16pm
Mark Schraad
2006

If I walk into a room and try and get the attention of the group and
say, "hey guys" - or if I am addressing a group of people and say,
"you guys" - I don't think of it in gender terms. Maybe that is my
bad - but having worked in the graphics field (which is definitely
not male dominated) I don't use the term as gender specific.

Sorry if you were offended Chris... but you're way off based if you
think I am referring to males only - or that only males can do the job.

Mark

On Oct 1, 2006, at 9:13 PM, Christine Boese wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> Why is it they would only be looking for an "omni GUY" or "a super
> flexible
> multi-talented GUY" ??!!
>
> No wonder women have such a hard time breaking into male dominated
> fields,
> if recruiters and hiring agents are only looking for positions that by
> definition can only be filled by men.
>
> Chris Boese
>
> On 9/28/06, mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
>>
>> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
>> material.]
>>
>> I completely agree. Most of these ads are looking for the omni guy
>> - or
>> super flexible multi talented guy. Is the fear of HR that they
>> don't really
>> know how to assess and hire a good designer? Might they not get
>> approval for
>> spending a decent amount on a mere designer? If they through some
>> production
>> or development utility they might just get this hire approved?
>>
>> It is curious to me the pressure being put on seasoned interactive or
>> experience designers that do not have a masters degree, yet have
>> 10 years
>> expereince doing it right.
>>
>> But I also understand the struggles of the small firm. Hiring a
>> full time
>> person is sometimes a challenge - when you only have a half a
>> person worth
>> of work, yet you want a long term profession that really knows
>> their stuff.
>>
>> Mark Schraad
>>
>>
>> On Thursday, September 28, 2006, at 08:01AM, jackbellis.com <
>> jackbellis at hotmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
>> material.]
>>>
>>> Bottom-line question: "As our rapidly increasing technology
>>> produces more
>>> multi-powered individuals, are companies any more justified in
>>> trying to
>>> hire artists who also code?"
>>>
>>> I've always been fascinated by ads for someone who can do both
>>> graphic
>>> design and, in his or her spare time "reengineer our world-wide
>>> network
>>> topology" (loose allusion to an old Dilbert). Below is a reduced
>>> version
>> of
>>> the ad that prompted this. I particularly like the juxtaposition
>>> of "B/A
>>> degree... illustration...Ajax... Extreme Programming Practices." I
>>> understand that on this list, a few (10? 100? 1000?) such marvels
>>> exist.
>> And
>>> I understand that small companies are, well, small, and many of
>>> us in
>> orgs
>>> of all size contribute to all roles in some regard.
>>>
>>> But I've always considered it idiotic to expect to have your
>>> branding
>> done
>>> by your ASP guy, and we all know this is probably under US$50K. I'd
>> advise
>>> any small company to use an agency of some sort if they need
>>> Leonardo,
>> but
>>> that's not my question. My question is, with our newer, very
>>> talented
>> young
>>> folks, is this becoming a more realistic expectation of them and/
>>> or the
>>> employee market??? I'm doubtful.
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> www.jackbellis.com
>>>
>>> Required:
>>> Ability to develop web site graphics from scratch
>>> Experience with ... ASP scripting.
>>> Bachelor of Art (B/A) degree in Graphic/Web Design .
>>>
>>> Ideal:
>>>
>>> Ability to create illustrations
>>> Experience with coding in JavaScript and using Ajax
>>> Experience with print design and color separation
>>> Experience creating brand identities
>>>
>>>
>>> Responsibilities
>>>
>>> Design print ads, online ads, and associated site landing pages
>>> under
>> tight
>>> deadlines.
>>> Design, code, and standardize landing page,using HTML, CSS, and ASP.
>>> Engage in detailed quality assurance activities that include
>>> proofing
>> copy
>>> Maintain internal documentation
>>> Assisting with creation of brand identity materials.
>>> Adhere to Extreme Programming practices
>>> Collaborate with vendors and outside parties as needed for
>>> support or
>> design
>>> initiatives.
>>>
>>> ________________________________________________________________
>>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>>> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
>>> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
>>> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
>>> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
>>> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
>>> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
>>> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>>>
>>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
>> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
>> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
>> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
>> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
>> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
>> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>>
>
>
>
> --
> christine boese
> www.serendipit-e.com
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org

1 Oct 2006 - 8:28pm
Robin Jeffries
2005

In most dialects of American English, guys is gender neutral, guy is male.
See
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/guy
or
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/guy

Most women do take offense at being refered to as "a guy" or "you guy".

Robin

On 10/1/06, Mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> If I walk into a room and try and get the attention of the group and
> say, "hey guys" - or if I am addressing a group of people and say,
> "you guys" - I don't think of it in gender terms. Maybe that is my
> bad - but having worked in the graphics field (which is definitely
> not male dominated) I don't use the term as gender specific.
>
> Sorry if you were offended Chris... but you're way off based if you
> think I am referring to males only - or that only males can do the job.
>
> Mark
>
>
>
> On Oct 1, 2006, at 9:13 PM, Christine Boese wrote:
>
> > [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> > material.]
> >
> > Why is it they would only be looking for an "omni GUY" or "a super
> > flexible
> > multi-talented GUY" ??!!
> >
> > No wonder women have such a hard time breaking into male dominated
> > fields,
> > if recruiters and hiring agents are only looking for positions that by
> > definition can only be filled by men.
> >
> > Chris Boese
> >
> > On 9/28/06, mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
> >>
> >> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> >> material.]
> >>
> >> I completely agree. Most of these ads are looking for the omni guy
> >> - or
> >> super flexible multi talented guy. Is the fear of HR that they
> >> don't really
> >> know how to assess and hire a good designer? Might they not get
> >> approval for
> >> spending a decent amount on a mere designer? If they through some
> >> production
> >> or development utility they might just get this hire approved?
> >>
> >> It is curious to me the pressure being put on seasoned interactive or
> >> experience designers that do not have a masters degree, yet have
> >> 10 years
> >> expereince doing it right.
> >>
> >> But I also understand the struggles of the small firm. Hiring a
> >> full time
> >> person is sometimes a challenge - when you only have a half a
> >> person worth
> >> of work, yet you want a long term profession that really knows
> >> their stuff.
> >>
> >> Mark Schraad
> >>
> >>
> >> On Thursday, September 28, 2006, at 08:01AM, jackbellis.com <
> >> jackbellis at hotmail.com> wrote:
> >>
> >>> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> >> material.]
> >>>
> >>> Bottom-line question: "As our rapidly increasing technology
> >>> produces more
> >>> multi-powered individuals, are companies any more justified in
> >>> trying to
> >>> hire artists who also code?"
> >>>
> >>> I've always been fascinated by ads for someone who can do both
> >>> graphic
> >>> design and, in his or her spare time "reengineer our world-wide
> >>> network
> >>> topology" (loose allusion to an old Dilbert). Below is a reduced
> >>> version
> >> of
> >>> the ad that prompted this. I particularly like the juxtaposition
> >>> of "B/A
> >>> degree... illustration...Ajax... Extreme Programming Practices." I
> >>> understand that on this list, a few (10? 100? 1000?) such marvels
> >>> exist.
> >> And
> >>> I understand that small companies are, well, small, and many of
> >>> us in
> >> orgs
> >>> of all size contribute to all roles in some regard.
> >>>
> >>> But I've always considered it idiotic to expect to have your
> >>> branding
> >> done
> >>> by your ASP guy, and we all know this is probably under US$50K. I'd
> >> advise
> >>> any small company to use an agency of some sort if they need
> >>> Leonardo,
> >> but
> >>> that's not my question. My question is, with our newer, very
> >>> talented
> >> young
> >>> folks, is this becoming a more realistic expectation of them and/
> >>> or the
> >>> employee market??? I'm doubtful.
> >>>
> >>> Thanks,
> >>> www.jackbellis.com
> >>>
> >>> Required:
> >>> Ability to develop web site graphics from scratch
> >>> Experience with ... ASP scripting.
> >>> Bachelor of Art (B/A) degree in Graphic/Web Design .
> >>>
> >>> Ideal:
> >>>
> >>> Ability to create illustrations
> >>> Experience with coding in JavaScript and using Ajax
> >>> Experience with print design and color separation
> >>> Experience creating brand identities
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Responsibilities
> >>>
> >>> Design print ads, online ads, and associated site landing pages
> >>> under
> >> tight
> >>> deadlines.
> >>> Design, code, and standardize landing page,using HTML, CSS, and ASP.
> >>> Engage in detailed quality assurance activities that include
> >>> proofing
> >> copy
> >>> Maintain internal documentation
> >>> Assisting with creation of brand identity materials.
> >>> Adhere to Extreme Programming practices
> >>> Collaborate with vendors and outside parties as needed for
> >>> support or
> >> design
> >>> initiatives.
> >>>
> >>> ________________________________________________________________
> >>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> >>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> >>> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> >>> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> >>> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> >>> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> >>> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> >>> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> >>> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
> >>>
> >>>
> >> ________________________________________________________________
> >> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> >> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> >> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> >> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> >> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> >> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> >> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> >> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> >> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
> >>
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > christine boese
> > www.serendipit-e.com
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> > List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> > (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> > Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> > Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> > Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> > Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

1 Oct 2006 - 10:37pm
Christine Boese
2006

No offense taken, Mark, just raising awareness. I appreciate your thoughts
below.

"Guys" alone, in the vernacular, is a common neutral term. However, specific
occupational attributes (programmer guy(s), graphics guy, etc, brings an
image to one's mind's eye, just as fireman brings up a different image from
firefighter, or businessman vs business person. It also feels one step away
from being what people think about when they write the job description.

When one says "We need an Oracle guy on this job," when talking to a product
team, what gender do you think team members are seeing in their minds?

I currently work at a media company that has a style guide which does not
require gender neutral language, something I've used in teaching and writing
for more than 20 years. It is constantly jarring to me to have to follow a
style guide that unabashedly adopts male as the norm and rarely uses neutral
language except in the plural, unless there is an already available word
like "firefighter" available to replace "fireman."

That may also explain some of my sensitivity to the issue, along with my
years of working in fields where the presence of women continues to be
remarked upon as unusual, even tho many women are active (and in leadership
roles) in those fields. Somehow, no matter how active individual women
become in male-dominated areas, job descriptions are still written with
people seeing men in the role, even if only in their minds while writing the
description. (and I'm not even getting into the issue of how job offers most
often get made to people who "look" the most "like" the people doing the
hiring, a physical mirroring that goes far beyond body language)

Chris

On 10/1/06, Mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
>
> If I walk into a room and try and get the attention of the group and
> say, "hey guys" - or if I am addressing a group of people and say,
> "you guys" - I don't think of it in gender terms. Maybe that is my
> bad - but having worked in the graphics field (which is definitely
> not male dominated) I don't use the term as gender specific.
>
> Sorry if you were offended Chris... but you're way off based if you
> think I am referring to males only - or that only males can do the job.
>
> Mark
>
>
>
> On Oct 1, 2006, at 9:13 PM, Christine Boese wrote:
>
> > [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> > material.]
> >
> > Why is it they would only be looking for an "omni GUY" or "a super
> > flexible
> > multi-talented GUY" ??!!
> >
> > No wonder women have such a hard time breaking into male dominated
> > fields,
> > if recruiters and hiring agents are only looking for positions that by
> > definition can only be filled by men.
> >
> > Chris Boese
> >
> > On 9/28/06, mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
> >>
> >> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> >> material.]
> >>
> >> I completely agree. Most of these ads are looking for the omni guy
> >> - or
> >> super flexible multi talented guy. Is the fear of HR that they
> >> don't really
> >> know how to assess and hire a good designer? Might they not get
> >> approval for
> >> spending a decent amount on a mere designer? If they through some
> >> production
> >> or development utility they might just get this hire approved?
> >>
> >> It is curious to me the pressure being put on seasoned interactive or
> >> experience designers that do not have a masters degree, yet have
> >> 10 years
> >> expereince doing it right.
> >>
> >> But I also understand the struggles of the small firm. Hiring a
> >> full time
> >> person is sometimes a challenge - when you only have a half a
> >> person worth
> >> of work, yet you want a long term profession that really knows
> >> their stuff.
> >>
> >> Mark Schraad
> >>
> >>

2 Oct 2006 - 4:02pm
Peter Boersma
2003

Jared M. Spool said [on generalists vs specialists]:
> The local economy will dictate which you get to hire.
>
> It seems unfair to me to judge an organization who can only afford
> generalists as being unrealistic or unpractical.

I'd like to argue that especially in the case of UX practitioners, some
degree of generalism, combined with a deep specialism, is required (as
explained in my T-model[1]).

Of course Jared knew I'd say this, since his article[2] makes the difference
between specialist and compartimentalist, but not everyone does...

[1] http://www.peterboersma.com/blog/2004/11/t-model-big-ia-is-now-ux.html
[2] http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2006/09/08/specialists-vs-generalists/

Peter
--
Peter Boersma | Senior Experience Designer | Info.nl
Sint Antoniesbreestraat 16 | 1011 HB | Amsterdam, The Netherlands
p: +31-20-530 9100 | m: +31-6-15072747 | f: +31-20-530 9101
mailto:peter at peterboersma.com | http://www.peterboersma.com/blog

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