What's your Personality Type? (Related to: NowHiring Leonardo DaVinci?)

30 Sep 2006 - 1:47pm
7 years ago
12 replies
850 reads
Christian Crumlish
2006

The quick two:
- What is your type?

According to the test I just took, to which you linked, I'm an ENFP, about 2/3rds toward extrovert and hovering right around the middle on the other three axes.

I'm quite sure in the past, though, that I've come up an I, a T, and a J. I think I'm always an N. My problem with this system is that the questions are all dichotomies without context, sometimes false dichotomies, and I often could choose either answer. The other problem I have is that I think sometimes we answer with a self-assessment and other times with a wish about who we were.

- What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)

Web strategy consultant, specializing in information architecture and interaction design.

If you're willing to write more:
- How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
person?

Not at all, as I don't really trust the scheme.

- What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it
meaningful to you?

Not really.

- Has personality type ever played a role in your research or designs?

No.

--xian

--
Christian Crumlish
http://extractable.com/blog
http://x-pollen.com

Comments

30 Sep 2006 - 7:34pm
Christian Crumlish
2006

So, on the test Dan linked to I came out INFJ... so am I liar, or does the nuanced wording of each question matter a great deal?

-----Original Message-----
From: ... Dan Saffer

BTW, if you haven't taken this test, the link is here. Takes about 10
minutes:

http://www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/JTypes2.asp

30 Sep 2006 - 8:46pm
Dana Smith
2005

Hi Christian,

> So, on the test Dan linked to I came out INFJ... so am I liar, or does
> the nuanced wording of each question matter a great deal?
>
Apparently so (the nuanced wording part, not the other part :) )

[shrug]

In my own results, over time there are aspects that I emphatically
score the same on, while the J/P portion is almost equally divided. (I
think it may flip-flop depending on what I have for breakfast.)

I did look into both my J and P descriptions, and found they both
describe traits I have. Did one of your two seem more like you than the
other?

Dana

30 Sep 2006 - 10:01pm
Vijay Venkatraman
2006

> - What is your type?
INTJ 17/62/25/33

> - What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)
Interaction Design/Product Design

The results should be very interesting.

2 Oct 2006 - 12:58am
Christopher Fahey
2005

I'm not surprised by all the N's, but wow, look at all the J's!

In an earlier discussion, I speculated that "empathy", despite our claims,
might not actually be a personality trait that is very common among IAs. A J
indicates decisiveness and strong planning skills, but are these traits
really consistent with someone who is supposed to care more about what other
people think? Can a J really accept a usability test's conclusion that their
design is 100% wrong, or are they more likely to be resistent to the change
of plan?

I also am surprised by the number of I's. Again, is an introverted person
ideally suited to empathy-based thinking? Or are they more likely to seek
working styles where they are able to focus on a solution by themselves.

I'm not saying that being an I or a J makes a person a bad information
architect. I'm just saying that a lot of IAs approach their job from a
perspective where putting themselves in another person's shoes and listening
to other people's opinions isn't as influential as we might think it would
be. Sometimes an IA's value is in their ability to hunker down by
themselves, consider all of the possibilities where a design can go right
and wrong, think of all the potential uses of an interface, map them all
out, and to think of new ideas in that context. A lot of IA work can be done
intuitively, which would explain why there are so many N's in this report.

Me?

I'm ENFP. (23,70,64,70)
I'm an entrepreneur, interaction design consultant, and a manager.

The test confirms what I already know: that I work best when I am paired up
with a J!

I also found about half of the questions to be ambigious and incredibly hard
to answer, and I suppose that a lot of my answers indicated the exact wrong
thing about me as a result. For example, the "Do you admire people who"
question: I answered "can get things done" because I wish I was better at
getting things done, but apparently that answer makes me less Feeling and
more Thinking. Apparently if I admire people who "are warm and kind" I'd be
more Feeling. These tests always kind of make me a little mad, knowing that
people are actually using them to make important decisions about people's
lives when in fact they seem so arbitrary. What does that say about me?

-Cf

Christopher Fahey
____________________________
Behavior
http://www.behaviordesign.com
me: http://www.graphpaper.com

2 Oct 2006 - 8:02am
Todd Warfel
2003

On Oct 2, 2006, at 1:58 AM, Christopher Fahey wrote:

> I'm not surprised by all the N's, but wow, look at all the J's!

I'm surprised by the number of Is moreso than the Js. Judging-
Perceiving equates to making decisions based on data and experience
more than going with a gut reaction.

Now, does that mean we're scared to go w/our gut and try new things,
or does it mean we look to make our decisions based on some
fundamental data? Or perhaps something else?

> I[...] A J indicates decisiveness and strong planning skills, but
> are these traits really consistent with someone who is supposed to
> care more about what other people think? Can a J really accept a
> usability test's conclusion that their design is 100% wrong, or are
> they more likely to be resistent to the change of plan?

Since when do we care what others think? ;). A good J should look at
the data provided by the usability test and be able to incorporate
that into their evaluation.

> I also am surprised by the number of I's.

Admittedly, this really surprises me. This is something that I think
would definitely impact our effectiveness, especially in this field.

> I'm ENFP. (23,70,64,70)
> I'm an entrepreneur, interaction design consultant, and a manager.

Thankfully, some of us are breaking the mold ;).

Cheers!

Todd R. Warfel
Partner, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | designing and usability consulting
--------------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (607) 339-9640
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
--------------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

2 Oct 2006 - 9:51am
Jay Morgan
2006

As for a J's appropriateness: I can see how a J tuned to user-centered
methods would use the decisivenss & planning to sustain good design methods
in a business-centered project lifecycle. That is, they're resisting the
business' bad habits in favor of good methods.

- jay, a borderline J
On 10/2/06, Christopher Fahey <chris.fahey at behaviordesign.com> wrote:
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> I'm not surprised by all the N's, but wow, look at all the J's!
>
> In an earlier discussion, I speculated that "empathy", despite our claims,
> might not actually be a personality trait that is very common among IAs. A
> J
> indicates decisiveness and strong planning skills, but are these traits
> really consistent with someone who is supposed to care more about what
> other
> people think? Can a J really accept a usability test's conclusion that
> their
> design is 100% wrong, or are they more likely to be resistent to the
> change
> of plan?
>
> I also am surprised by the number of I's. Again, is an introverted person
> ideally suited to empathy-based thinking? Or are they more likely to seek
> working styles where they are able to focus on a solution by themselves.
>
> I'm not saying that being an I or a J makes a person a bad information
> architect. I'm just saying that a lot of IAs approach their job from a
> perspective where putting themselves in another person's shoes and
> listening
> to other people's opinions isn't as influential as we might think it would
> be. Sometimes an IA's value is in their ability to hunker down by
> themselves, consider all of the possibilities where a design can go right
> and wrong, think of all the potential uses of an interface, map them all
> out, and to think of new ideas in that context. A lot of IA work can be
> done
> intuitively, which would explain why there are so many N's in this report.
>
> Me?
>
> I'm ENFP. (23,70,64,70)
> I'm an entrepreneur, interaction design consultant, and a manager.
>
> The test confirms what I already know: that I work best when I am paired
> up
> with a J!
>
> I also found about half of the questions to be ambigious and incredibly
> hard
> to answer, and I suppose that a lot of my answers indicated the exact
> wrong
> thing about me as a result. For example, the "Do you admire people who"
> question: I answered "can get things done" because I wish I was better at
> getting things done, but apparently that answer makes me less Feeling and
> more Thinking. Apparently if I admire people who "are warm and kind" I'd
> be
> more Feeling. These tests always kind of make me a little mad, knowing
> that
> people are actually using them to make important decisions about people's
> lives when in fact they seem so arbitrary. What does that say about me?
>
> -Cf
>
> Christopher Fahey
> ____________________________
> Behavior
> http://www.behaviordesign.com
> me: http://www.graphpaper.com
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
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--
Jay A. Morgan
jayamorgan at gmail

2 Oct 2006 - 10:23am
Dana Smith
2005

Hi Christopher,

> I also am surprised by the number of I's. Again, is an introverted
> person
> ideally suited to empathy-based thinking? Or are they more likely to
> seek
> working styles where they are able to focus on a solution by
> themselves.
>
> I'm not saying that being an I or a J makes a person a bad information
> architect. I'm just saying that a lot of IAs approach their job from a
> perspective where putting themselves in another person's shoes and
> listening
> to other people's opinions isn't as influential as we might think it
> would
> be. Sometimes an IA's value is in their ability to hunker down by
> themselves, consider all of the possibilities where a design can go
> right
> and wrong, think of all the potential uses of an interface, map them
> all
> out, and to think of new ideas in that context. A lot of IA work can
> be done
> intuitively, which would explain why there are so many N's in this
> report.

Perhaps it's worth diving a little deeper into the I / E distinction,
as it's somewhat different than the typical use of the words.

"Extroverted or Introverted
This category deals with how we prefer to interact with the world and
how we prefer to get our energy and stimulation.
Extraverts are energized by other people and action. They are talkers,
often thinking out loud, interrupting people at meetings, or bursting
into a co-worker's office to ask an opinion, and then not really
listening to it. Extraverts become drained when they have to spend too
much time alone; they need other people to function.
Introverts, on the other hand, get their energy from their own thoughts
and ideas, rather than heated discussions. Introverts rarely speak up
at large meetings, preferring listening to talking. Introverts need
alone time, especially after spending a few hours with people."
(http://www.personalitytest.net/types/definitions.htm#extravert)

I think an I or E tendency is a wholly separate thing from a person's
level of empathy. "Introverts ... preferring listening to talking."
That says to me that they are in fact paying More attention to the
other person's thoughts and actions than others might, a key element of
empathy.

Dana

2 Oct 2006 - 10:25am
Mark Canlas
2003

- What is your type?

INTJ

- What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)

Currently, I'm a Perl programmer in the content management department. In a
previous life, I was a web developer/designer.

- How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
person?

I type people, constantly. Even characters in TV and cartoons. I've read
lots (perhaps too much) about the MBTI. It's helped me become more confident
in myself, as well as more respectful of other people's methods and
perspectives, however wrong they may be (MBTI joke). I've also recognized
going through that everything-fits-MBTI phase. It's not fair to box people
in like that. Moderation is key.

As a designer, I've wondered if a dualistic approach would be the best for
approaching any given situation. MBTI is very polar, dichotimous, so why not
provide those types of solutions. Not one size fits all, but two. It was
just a thought, I haven't put it into practice.

- What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it
meaningful to you?

Learning my type was absolutely meaningful to me. I think especially for the
loner/INTJ crowd, it's a sort of validation. That someone, somewhere not
only understands who you are and how you function at the core, but shares
your same quirks and isms. It's quite eye-opening after having been
misunderstood or anxious for so long. It's not *your* fault for being
difficult to understand, we're just different.

- Has personality type ever played a role in your research or designs?

I'm currently on a quest to find what makes Apple design so strong. I think
it's a sort of INTJ-esque, monster, one-man-rules-all view of design. Like,
not design by committee. No compromises. A true artist's vision, unbridled
by constraint or even reality.

- If you are outside the US, is there different or additional test that
is prominently used?

Still inside the US, I think. But the "Enneagrams" (sp) test, sort of a
rival/companion to the MBTI. Some say MBTI measures *what* you do, and
Enneagrams (needs proper spelling) measure *why* you do.

- What else?

Open to answer any questions on the MBTI, although I'm very behind on the
list.

-Mark

2 Oct 2006 - 10:43am
Dante Murphy
2006

- What is your type?

ENFJ
41 / 76 / 52 / 41

So, apparently only the "N" is a statistically significant tendency.

- What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)

Principal IA / Manager

- How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
person?

I never think about it. A disciplined designer knows how to account for
bias at a "line item level", so being aware of MBTI type isn't
particularly useful.

- What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it
meaningful to you?

The first time I took the MBTI test I worked for a woman who was
parametrically opposite of my rating at the time (which I don't recall).
It confirmed the fact that we worked well together because of how
different we were and because we were able to respect each other's
views, even when it took conscious effort to do so.

- Has personality type ever played a role in your research or designs?

Not sure how it could without severely impacting the research
environment.

2 Oct 2006 - 10:55am
russwilson
2005

ENFP (borderline ENTP)

Director of Product Design
(ultimately responsible for design and usability across all products)

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of
Dana Smith
Sent: Friday, September 29, 2006 11:53 PM
To: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] What's your Personality Type? (Related to:
NowHiring Leonardo DaVinci?)

[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
material.]

Hello Everyone,

I am very curious about the personality types of designers, and the
recent conversation about multidisciplinary skill-sets prompted this
message to you.

I'd like to conduct an informal (and quite unscientific) survey about
the personality types on this list. I think it could shed light on
topics of interest to many of us, including another way to look at what
it is to be a Designer.

Let's use the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator as common ground. The MBTI
generates a 4-letter type, and I anticipate many of you have taken this
at some point in your educational or professional careers. If you're not
familiar with the MBTI, or don't know your type, more info is at the end
of this message.

My initial questions are also below; if you have limited time, there are
two quick main questions.

I'm interested in any stories or information you are willing to share.
Please feel free to reply on or off-list as you feel comfortable. I will
report an anonymous tally of the types and corresponding occupations
back to the group. (Of course, I'll include my own type and thoughts as
well. :) )

I'm going to continue this exploration in the coming months with a goal
of simply understanding what this thing we call Designer is, and how
personality types might play a role in our design process.

If any of you have expert knowledge of the MBTI, experience
administering the test, or use personality type information in your
design work, I welcome your perspective as well.

Thank you all, and I hope you'll participate and discuss, Dana

----------

Here are the questions:

-----------

The quick two:
- What is your type?
- What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)

If you're willing to write more:
- How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
person?
- What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it meaningful
to you?
- Has personality type ever played a role in your research or designs?
- If you are outside the US, is there different or additional test that
is prominently used?
- What else?

----------

----------

MBTI resources:

- Wikipedia is a great starting point:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MBTI

- This free test is the closest to the official test that I've seen:
http://www.personalitytest.net/types/index.htm
(There are also a variety of (not free) resources available online and
off to take the original MBTI in a more structured, authentic way.)

- My favorite site for the Type profiles:
http://www.typelogic.com/

----------

(A discussion about the reliability of this test could be another long
thread, I'm sure. My particular interest here is in what your result
meant to you personally and as a designer; did it ring true?)

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org List Guidelines
............ http://listguide.ixda.org/ List Help ..................
http://listhelp.ixda.org/ (Un)Subscription Options ...
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Questions .................. lists at ixda.org Home .......................
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2 Oct 2006 - 11:31am
Becubed
2004

> So, apparently only the "N" is a statistically significant tendency.

It's quite an interesting tendency indeed! Adding to this trend, I'll
note my profile:

INTx

Although I score almost to the edge of the scale in each of INT, the
"x" indicates that I'm exactly in the middle of P and J. I'll argue
this gives me a leg up as an interaction designer, having the
flexibility to think from two perspectives with equal comfort;
however, at times I suspect others would argue it's an infuriating
quality to deal with someone who appears to keep changing their
mind... /grin

The first time I went through this exercise with a team, about 12
years ago, I found it pretty useful as a manager. In particular, it
was a good reminder that some folks really need *frequent* positive
feedback to feel motivated, while others don't.

Not that you'd ever want to ration positive feedback, of course, but
it was interesting to appreciate how it has different effects on
different people.

--
Robert Barlow-Busch
Practice Director, Interaction Design
Quarry Integrated Communications Inc.
rbarlowbusch at quarry.com
(519) 570-2020

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2 Oct 2006 - 12:04pm
Sean Voisen
2006

> I also am surprised by the number of I's. Again, is an introverted person
> ideally suited to empathy-based thinking? Or are they more likely to seek
> working styles where they are able to focus on a solution by themselves.

I think we need to be careful when using the words "extrovert" and
"introvert" in this context. I'm technically an "I," but I'm plenty
extroverted and social when it comes to any party, meeting or other
gathering. It's just that I tend to listen far more than I talk - I have a
habit of asking lots of questions of someone else and not sharing too much
about myself. I'm more deliberate than most extroverts in what I speak
outwardly. But I consider all this a plus when it comes to understanding
other people.

Sean

--
Sean Voisen
Interaction Design Technologist
http://seanvoisen.com

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