Portfolios

15 Apr 2004 - 8:25pm
6 years ago
23 replies
600 reads
Christian Simon
2003

> on 4/15/04 12:00, John Vaughan <vaughan1 at optonline.net> wrote:
> And the relevant questions is: If I do, Will anyone read it? Well, yes -
> and no. I doubt that many people looking at my site want to read a detailed
> tech spec cover-to-cover. But they DO want to get a sense of my approach &
> credibility.

Besides the obvious points work docs are proprietary and boring-- unless you
work for one of the few big time agencies that have work products that look
like pages taken from Tufte-- most are very ugly.

As I write this I realize I should give an example of what I mean by
big-time agencies. Just that, large consultancies often produce a lot of
documentation with their final products. If you're working at a software
development company your docs will only be reviewed internally. Just like
programming you would look for the first easy answer. You might not even
think of your work docs looking any different then how they are.

For many people, redoing a work product for a portfolio is a hassle.
Consider hiring a visual designer to give your work a new look.

My2C,
xtian

_________________________________________________________________
Christian Simon | www.christiansimon.com | San Francisco Bay Area

Comments

22 Feb 2008 - 1:38pm
White, Jeff
2007

For months now, I've been wanting to redo my portfolio. I'm curious as to
what approaches everyone is taking out there, and I'm really interested in
tangible, print style portfolios, not a website.

What approach did you take for your portfolio? What have you seen from
others that you like? What resources are out there for portfolio
inspiration? Hiring managers - what about a portfolio inspires you? Or
depresses you? :-)

Jeff

22 Feb 2008 - 1:47pm
sajid saiyed
2005

Hi,
Just out of curiosity, is everything that you want to show can be
explained or justified in a print style tangible format?

-sajid

On Sat, Feb 23, 2008 at 12:08 AM, Jeff White <jwhite31 at gmail.com> wrote:
> For months now, I've been wanting to redo my portfolio. I'm curious as to
> what approaches everyone is taking out there, and I'm really interested in
> tangible, print style portfolios, not a website.
>
> What approach did you take for your portfolio? What have you seen from
> others that you like? What resources are out there for portfolio
> inspiration? Hiring managers - what about a portfolio inspires you? Or
> depresses you? :-)
>
> Jeff
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

22 Feb 2008 - 1:56pm
White, Jeff
2007

Yes, I believe so - I strictly work on websites and web applications. But I
would guess that folks out there doing interaction design for products and
other experiences can still capture their work with photography and the
right kind of documentation. Although I'm sure there are exceptions.

Jeff

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 1:47 PM, sajid saiyed <sajid.id at gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi,
> Just out of curiosity, is everything that you want to show can be
> explained or justified in a print style tangible format?
>
> -sajid
>
> On Sat, Feb 23, 2008 at 12:08 AM, Jeff White <jwhite31 at gmail.com> wrote:
> > For months now, I've been wanting to redo my portfolio. I'm curious as
> to
> > what approaches everyone is taking out there, and I'm really interested
> in
> > tangible, print style portfolios, not a website.
> >
> > What approach did you take for your portfolio? What have you seen from
> > others that you like? What resources are out there for portfolio
> > inspiration? Hiring managers - what about a portfolio inspires you? Or
> > depresses you? :-)
> >
> > Jeff
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> >
>

22 Feb 2008 - 2:03pm
Ari
2006

what works for a portfolio is a matter of preference and is largely
determined by who your intended audience is.

i think anyone focusing on UI and IxD, should probably have a portfolio with
one or more screen shots of your work, a description of the project, your
direct role, tools and techniques employed, a link to a finished product (if
possible) and possibly ancillary links to related items like documentation
or sample files.

i wrote my own portfolio tool - it offers most of the above and supports an
site-friendly version and a printer-friendly version. it's definitely NOT
fancy but it's fast, extensible (can support more more and works with any
web page layout) and most importantly, does the job.

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 1:56 PM, Jeff White <jwhite31 at gmail.com> wrote:

> Yes, I believe so - I strictly work on websites and web applications. But
> I
> would guess that folks out there doing interaction design for products and
> other experiences can still capture their work with photography and the
> right kind of documentation. Although I'm sure there are exceptions.
>
> Jeff
>
> On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 1:47 PM, sajid saiyed <sajid.id at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Hi,
> > Just out of curiosity, is everything that you want to show can be
> > explained or justified in a print style tangible format?
> >
> > -sajid
> >
> > On Sat, Feb 23, 2008 at 12:08 AM, Jeff White <jwhite31 at gmail.com> wrote:
> > > For months now, I've been wanting to redo my portfolio. I'm curious as
> > to
> > > what approaches everyone is taking out there, and I'm really
> interested
> > in
> > > tangible, print style portfolios, not a website.
> > >
> > > What approach did you take for your portfolio? What have you seen
> from
> > > others that you like? What resources are out there for portfolio
> > > inspiration? Hiring managers - what about a portfolio inspires you?
> Or
> > > depresses you? :-)
> > >
> > > Jeff
> > > ________________________________________________________________
> > > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> > >
> >
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
--------------------------------------------------
www.flyingyogi.com
--------------------------------------------------

22 Feb 2008 - 2:07pm
Cindy Alvarez
2004

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 10:38 AM, Jeff White <jwhite31 at gmail.com> wrote:

> For months now, I've been wanting to redo my portfolio. I'm curious as to
> what approaches everyone is taking out there, and I'm really interested in
> tangible, print style portfolios, not a website.
>
> What approach did you take for your portfolio? What have you seen from
> others that you like? What resources are out there for portfolio
> inspiration? Hiring managers - what about a portfolio inspires you? Or
> depresses you? :-)

As a hiring manager, print style portfolios depress me.

Seriously, I would expect an interaction designer to have their portfolio
online, and here's why: when people show me a physical portfolio, the
burden is on me to ask "why is this relevant? what was your contribution?"
When people put their work in an online format, it's their responsibility to
figure out "what can I show? how can I explain why what I did was
valuable? how can I explain my thought process?" That's the same type of
critical problem-solving that I expect them to be able to apply to a
software design challenge.

I don't have super high expectations for the level of visual design or the
amount of detail (I know many people have worked on projects where they
cannot publicly show work due to IP issues) - but I expect to see that the
effort was made.

Cindy

22 Feb 2008 - 2:14pm
sajid saiyed
2005

For any Website and Web application, I think a print style potfolio
can not do full justice except give a preview of the visual design.
It can not explain the navigation, interaction, usability issues etc.

I think the 'feel' would be missing... IMO.

- sajid

On Sat, Feb 23, 2008 at 12:26 AM, Jeff White <jwhite31 at gmail.com> wrote:
> Yes, I believe so - I strictly work on websites and web applications. But I
> would guess that folks out there doing interaction design for products and
> other experiences can still capture their work with photography and the
> right kind of documentation. Although I'm sure there are exceptions.
>
> Jeff
>
>
>
> On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 1:47 PM, sajid saiyed <sajid.id at gmail.com> wrote:
> > Hi,
> > Just out of curiosity, is everything that you want to show can be
> > explained or justified in a print style tangible format?
> >
> > -sajid
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > On Sat, Feb 23, 2008 at 12:08 AM, Jeff White <jwhite31 at gmail.com> wrote:
> > > For months now, I've been wanting to redo my portfolio. I'm curious as
> to
> > > what approaches everyone is taking out there, and I'm really interested
> in
> > > tangible, print style portfolios, not a website.
> > >
> > > What approach did you take for your portfolio? What have you seen from
> > > others that you like? What resources are out there for portfolio
> > > inspiration? Hiring managers - what about a portfolio inspires you? Or
> > > depresses you? :-)
> > >
> > > Jeff
> > > ________________________________________________________________
> > > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> > >
> >
>
>

22 Feb 2008 - 2:15pm
Jack L. Moffett
2005

On Feb 22, 2008, at 2:07 PM, Cindy Alvarez wrote:

> When people put their work in an online format, it's their
> responsibility to
> figure out "what can I show? how can I explain why what I did was
> valuable? how can I explain my thought process?" That's the same
> type of
> critical problem-solving that I expect them to be able to apply to a
> software design challenge.

And why isn't it their responsibility to do the same for a print-
based portfolio?

Jack

Jack L. Moffett
Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

The details are not the details.
They make the design.

-Charles Eames

22 Feb 2008 - 2:31pm
Cindy Alvarez
2004

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 11:15 AM, Jack Moffett <jmoffett at inmedius.com>
wrote:

>
> On Feb 22, 2008, at 2:07 PM, Cindy Alvarez wrote:
>
> > When people put their work in an online format, it's their
> > responsibility to
> > figure out "what can I show? how can I explain why what I did was
> > valuable? how can I explain my thought process?" That's the same
> > type of
> > critical problem-solving that I expect them to be able to apply to a
> > software design challenge.
>
> And why isn't it their responsibility to do the same for a print-
> based portfolio?

It is, but I have yet to see someone do this well. There's a temptation to
hand over pieces of paper and wait for me to ask questions, and that just
doesn't impress me. I'm willing to believe there are folks who can do this
well, but I haven't seen them yet (and I've interviewed plenty of folks).

Cindy

22 Feb 2008 - 2:32pm
Katie Albers
2005

Since I know about my own experience, I'll stick to it.

My portfolio is a PowerPoint file (and anyone who knows me will find
that hysterically funny) because (1) I have NDAs that specify I can't
reproduce work done online; (2) I've done a lot of work on internal
and password protected sites, so they aren't accessible; (3) I've
worked with a lot of startups that went out of business (but many of
the NDAs are still enforceable); (4) Many of the projects I've worked
on have been superceded by later work; (5) Many of my salient
deliverables are text based. In short, why require employers to refer
to two separate portfolios.

Is it optimal? no. Is it a reasonable representation of what I've
done? probably...and it has the advantage of allowing me to explain
my role in each project clearly.

So, the reasons I use the type of portfolio and treat it as I do are
precisely your reasons for finding print style portfolios depressing.

In fact, it seems you object to the content, not the presentation
method. If you want a portfolio that tells you what the person's role
was, what the project was, what the challenges were, what kind of
team they worked with, then why not say *that* rather than blaming
the presentation method. I've seen a lot more online portfolios that
just point me to the sites than I have print portfolios that do the
same.

Katie

At 11:07 AM -0800 2/22/08, Cindy Alvarez wrote:
>On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 10:38 AM, Jeff White <jwhite31 at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> For months now, I've been wanting to redo my portfolio. I'm curious as to
>> what approaches everyone is taking out there, and I'm really interested in
>> tangible, print style portfolios, not a website.
>>
>> What approach did you take for your portfolio? What have you seen from
>> others that you like? What resources are out there for portfolio
>> inspiration? Hiring managers - what about a portfolio inspires you? Or
>> depresses you? :-)
>
>
>As a hiring manager, print style portfolios depress me.
>
>Seriously, I would expect an interaction designer to have their portfolio
>online, and here's why: when people show me a physical portfolio, the
>burden is on me to ask "why is this relevant? what was your contribution?"
>When people put their work in an online format, it's their responsibility to
>figure out "what can I show? how can I explain why what I did was
>valuable? how can I explain my thought process?" That's the same type of
>critical problem-solving that I expect them to be able to apply to a
>software design challenge.
>
>I don't have super high expectations for the level of visual design or the
>amount of detail (I know many people have worked on projects where they
>cannot publicly show work due to IP issues) - but I expect to see that the
>effort was made.
>
>Cindy
>________________________________________________________________
>Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

--

----------------
Katie Albers
katie at firstthought.com

22 Feb 2008 - 2:38pm
stauciuc
2006

For some of the reasons outlined by Cindy, I started with an online
portfolio. This way, I figured, the portfolio itself would show my skills of
creating an interactive experience, not only the content. But since I wrote
all the html+css myself, I must say it was a bit hard and time-consuming to
maintain (every time you're adding a new piece, you have to tend to the code
too, not just the content ant the presentation).
Since some employers / university programs require a printed portfolio for
their application procedure, I decided after a while that I had to have a
printed one too (and given this context it was definetely a good idea). I
got different kinds of advice from different people, and in the end I wanted
to create a balance between making it look good, giving relevant details
about each project and keeping it short.
Definitely, there are many different ways one can do it. Mine(s) turned out
like this:
http://www.sergiutauciuc.ro/docs/portfolio-sergiu-tauciuc.pdf
http://www.sergiutauciuc.ro/en/index.htm

With the printed one I think I'm going to stick for a while (unless anyone
suggests improvements :) )
The one on the web I would like to turn into a nice timeline, but I fear the
time that would require to build and to update.

Sebi

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 9:07 PM, Cindy Alvarez <cindy at cindyalvarez.com>
wrote:

>
> As a hiring manager, print style portfolios depress me.
>
> Seriously, I would expect an interaction designer to have their portfolio
> online, and here's why: when people show me a physical portfolio, the
> burden is on me to ask "why is this relevant? what was your
> contribution?"
> When people put their work in an online format, it's their responsibility
> to
> figure out "what can I show? how can I explain why what I did was
> valuable? how can I explain my thought process?" That's the same type of
> critical problem-solving that I expect them to be able to apply to a
> software design challenge.
>
> I don't have super high expectations for the level of visual design or the
> amount of detail (I know many people have worked on projects where they
> cannot publicly show work due to IP issues) - but I expect to see that the
> effort was made.
>
> Cindy
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
Sergiu Sebastian Tauciuc
http://www.sergiutauciuc.ro/en/

22 Feb 2008 - 2:34pm
Ari
2006

i agree with this but websites are not permanent - i worked on many and
quite a few no longer exist or exist as they did when i was involved.

the same goes for applications. i had a bunch i wrote in my early 20s that
were pretty cool that could probably run under an emulator if i had saved
the floppy disk.

hence, that's why i said (if possible). just because something no longer
exists, it doesn't mean the time and work invested in it was for nothing.

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 2:13 PM, Weixi Yen <weixiyen at gmail.com> wrote:

> > a link to a finished product (if possible)
>
> The most important thing is not what you said you did, but what you
> actually did. If your projects are not coming to fruition due to mistakes
> by other members of your team, you should probably create fake projects in
> your free time to demonstrate a possible end result. The finished product
> is not an "if possible" but it's a MUST. It's about marketing, so most
> people won't have the time to mull over what your role actually was. It's
> all about finished products. If you do nothing else, it's best to list the
> finished products of what you participated in.
>
>
>
>
> On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 11:03 AM, Ari Feldman <ari1970 at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > what works for a portfolio is a matter of preference and is largely
> > determined by who your intended audience is.
> >
> > i think anyone focusing on UI and IxD, should probably have a portfolio
> > with
> > one or more screen shots of your work, a description of the project,
> > your
> > direct role, tools and techniques employed, a link to a finished product
> > (if
> > possible) and possibly ancillary links to related items like
> > documentation
> > or sample files.
> >
> > i wrote my own portfolio tool - it offers most of the above and supports
> > an
> > site-friendly version and a printer-friendly version. it's definitely
> > NOT
> > fancy but it's fast, extensible (can support more more and works with
> > any
> > web page layout) and most importantly, does the job.
> >
> >
>

--
--------------------------------------------------
www.flyingyogi.com
--------------------------------------------------

22 Feb 2008 - 2:41pm
Jack L. Moffett
2005

On Feb 22, 2008, at 2:31 PM, Cindy Alvarez wrote:

> It is, but I have yet to see someone do this well. There's a
> temptation to hand over pieces of paper and wait for me to ask
> questions, and that just doesn't impress me. I'm willing to
> believe there are folks who can do this well, but I haven't seen
> them yet (and I've interviewed plenty of folks).

I'm sorry to hear that. I'm of the opinion that a designer should be
able to communicate about their work in a static format. The work I
do, while web based, is not available for viewing online, and not
something I would be able to show in an interview, requiring a server
installation and so-forth. Regardless of the format, be it a website,
a print piece, or a slide show, I would have to present my work
statically and explain all of what you were asking for in text or
speech.

I always encourage students to produce process books for their
portfolios.

Jack

Jack L. Moffett
Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

I am in search of the
simple elegant seductive
maybe even obvious IDEA.
With this in my pocket
I cannot fail.

- Tibor Kalman

22 Feb 2008 - 2:45pm
bminihan
2007

A lot of my work over the past 5 years was corporate intranet type stuff,
and the nature of my work improves the design/development process as much
(if not more than) the final result, so I came up with this format:
http://bryanminihan.com/case-mygskredesign.html

It keeps me from being too wordy (a problem of mine), gets to the salient
points quickly, and helped me land the job I have now. I have a print
version of each of these, for when I'm face to face and don't have a
computer handy.

For public sites, I direct people to the actual site if it's still
operational, although I wish I had such a case study for all my work (so
much to write, so little time...*sigh*).

Bryan
http://www.bryanminihan.com

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Jeff
White
Sent: Friday, February 22, 2008 1:39 PM
To: IxDA Discuss
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Portfolios

For months now, I've been wanting to redo my portfolio. I'm curious as to
what approaches everyone is taking out there, and I'm really interested in
tangible, print style portfolios, not a website.

What approach did you take for your portfolio? What have you seen from
others that you like? What resources are out there for portfolio
inspiration? Hiring managers - what about a portfolio inspires you? Or
depresses you? :-)

Jeff
________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

22 Feb 2008 - 2:21pm
Jennifer Vignone
2008

Everyone should have a portfolio in print form.
It just speaks to a level of preparedness and covering as many bases as possible, which exemplifies what this type of work is about. My online presence runs a gamut of the different things I do. I am less likely to update that for each and every meeting. The printed book is easier to play around with. Also, in the event that you have am agreement with a client not to post samples, but can show them (and not leave anything behind) the print portfolio is where this will occur.

My own portfolio reflects what the position is that I am after, with a few other things thrown in that I think might be a good aside, based on the job description I have read or been told about, as well as the result of any phone conversation with the prospective client. This gives me the opportunity to move through the book and point out examples relevant to the conversation, as well as go off into a tangential thought if the opportunity is there and makes sense to do so.

Typically, each meeting has me going through the portfolio to include or exclude some things in order to customize it to the interview. I may reshuffle items as well to have a different order. Some clients don't care to see a portfolio at all, but I always bring it with me. I have been in interviews in conference rooms where there are no computers, and so calling up a sample isn't always possible. With the rush of the day-to-day, you can find yourself shuttered off in a small makeshift conference room and if you don't have something to emphasize an idea or address the point-blank "show me your portfolio" question, it makes for a difficult discussion.

22 Feb 2008 - 2:13pm
Weixi Yen
2007

> a link to a finished product (if possible)

The most important thing is not what you said you did, but what you actually
did. If your projects are not coming to fruition due to mistakes by other
members of your team, you should probably create fake projects in your free
time to demonstrate a possible end result. The finished product is not an
"if possible" but it's a MUST. It's about marketing, so most people won't
have the time to mull over what your role actually was. It's all about
finished products. If you do nothing else, it's best to list the finished
products of what you participated in.

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 11:03 AM, Ari Feldman <ari1970 at gmail.com> wrote:

> what works for a portfolio is a matter of preference and is largely
> determined by who your intended audience is.
>
> i think anyone focusing on UI and IxD, should probably have a portfolio
> with
> one or more screen shots of your work, a description of the project, your
> direct role, tools and techniques employed, a link to a finished product
> (if
> possible) and possibly ancillary links to related items like documentation
> or sample files.
>
> i wrote my own portfolio tool - it offers most of the above and supports
> an
> site-friendly version and a printer-friendly version. it's definitely NOT
> fancy but it's fast, extensible (can support more more and works with any
> web page layout) and most importantly, does the job.
>
>

22 Feb 2008 - 4:10pm
Ari
2006

for job interviews and/or pitching a client this is an absolute must. sage
advice.

layout is subjective but i have my online for reference in an email and
because i have a printer-friendly version of my online portfolio, which is
data-drive, i can easily generate a printed version of a portfolio deck via
Acrobat's web print feature or via a script.

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 2:21 PM, JenniferVignone <
jennifervignone at earthlink.net> wrote:

> Everyone should have a portfolio in print form.
> It just speaks to a level of preparedness and covering as many bases as
> possible, which exemplifies what this type of work is about. My online
> presence runs a gamut of the different things I do. I am less likely to
> update that for each and every meeting. The printed book is easier to play
> around with. Also, in the event that you have am agreement with a client not
> to post samples, but can show them (and not leave anything behind) the print
> portfolio is where this will occur.
>
> My own portfolio reflects what the position is that I am after, with a few
> other things thrown in that I think might be a good aside, based on the job
> description I have read or been told about, as well as the result of any
> phone conversation with the prospective client. This gives me the
> opportunity to move through the book and point out examples relevant to the
> conversation, as well as go off into a tangential thought if the opportunity
> is there and makes sense to do so.
>
> Typically, each meeting has me going through the portfolio to include or
> exclude some things in order to customize it to the interview. I may
> reshuffle items as well to have a different order. Some clients don't care
> to see a portfolio at all, but I always bring it with me. I have been in
> interviews in conference rooms where there are no computers, and so calling
> up a sample isn't always possible. With the rush of the day-to-day, you can
> find yourself shuttered off in a small makeshift conference room and if you
> don't have something to emphasize an idea or address the point-blank "show
> me your portfolio" question, it makes for a difficult discussion.
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
--------------------------------------------------
www.flyingyogi.com
--------------------------------------------------

22 Feb 2008 - 4:42pm
dmitryn
2004

I have to disagree with this. While it is great to show that you've
been able to drive a design to completion/release (especially if
applying for a position that demands a certain level of experience), a
list of finished products does nothing to show a prospective employer
your process, deliverables, or particular contribution to a project.
Also, a list of finished products is the easiest thing to fake, and
thus the least reliable indication of one's skill and experience.

Dmitry

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 11:13 AM, Weixi Yen <weixiyen at gmail.com> wrote:
> It's all about
> finished products. If you do nothing else, it's best to list the finished
> products of what you participated in.

22 Feb 2008 - 4:56pm
Ari
2006

i hear that. that's it's always advisable to bring deliverables from hefty
specs to wireframes and any other pertinent matter.

this shows not only how you think and what you've done - it also shows that
you're thorough and prepared.

i also advise preparing leave-behinds when possible - be it printed matter
or a CD.

the goal is to show what you've done, what you know and what you can do.
people who know what they're looking for and what they're doing will
appreciate this extra effort.

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 4:42 PM, Dmitry Nekrasovski <mail.dmitry at gmail.com>
wrote:

> I have to disagree with this. While it is great to show that you've
> been able to drive a design to completion/release (especially if
> applying for a position that demands a certain level of experience), a
> list of finished products does nothing to show a prospective employer
> your process, deliverables, or particular contribution to a project.
> Also, a list of finished products is the easiest thing to fake, and
> thus the least reliable indication of one's skill and experience.
>
> Dmitry
>
> On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 11:13 AM, Weixi Yen <weixiyen at gmail.com> wrote:
> > It's all about
> > finished products. If you do nothing else, it's best to list the
> finished
> > products of what you participated in.
>

--
--------------------------------------------------
www.flyingyogi.com
--------------------------------------------------

22 Feb 2008 - 5:00pm
Cindy Alvarez
2004

I'd agree with that. Lots of products don't make it to market for reasons
well beyond the designer's control - and lots of products have a finished
state that was nothing like the designer's intent because of exec ex
machina. HOW you worked - researched, prioritized, sketched, tested -
given whatever your particular constraints were, is what I need to know.

Come to think of it, that may explain partially why I get inferior feedback
from people presenting paper portfolios in-person -- many people seem
reluctant to talk about their constraints (perhaps feeling that it will
sound like making excuses?). All design projects have constraints - and
sometimes those are HUGE, impassable constraints - but at least you can talk
about what you had a chance to do, what workarounds you achieved, and what
you would've done under better circumstances.

Cindy
PS - I'd rather see an online (or offline) portfolio with minimal
visuals/deliverables but great ANALYSIS, than to have you bring in
deliverables that I suspect you shouldn't be showing me since I'm not under
NDA. ("All rights reserved - For internal distribution only" in the footer
= bad idea to show that you don't respect your former employers' IP.)

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 1:42 PM, Dmitry Nekrasovski <mail.dmitry at gmail.com>
wrote:

> I have to disagree with this. While it is great to show that you've
> been able to drive a design to completion/release (especially if
> applying for a position that demands a certain level of experience), a
> list of finished products does nothing to show a prospective employer
> your process, deliverables, or particular contribution to a project.
> Also, a list of finished products is the easiest thing to fake, and
> thus the least reliable indication of one's skill and experience.
>
> Dmitry
>
> On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 11:13 AM, Weixi Yen <weixiyen at gmail.com> wrote:
> > It's all about
> > finished products. If you do nothing else, it's best to list the
> finished
> > products of what you participated in.
> ________________________________________________________________
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22 Feb 2008 - 5:05pm
Anthony Hempell
2007

Here's one more tip re portfolios: include credits for the people you
worked with.

If you're showing examples of final product, credit the designer/art
director/creative director, the technical lead, the producer/PM... it
doesn't have to be a laundry list of everyone who came to a meeting,
but you do need to show that you can "work well with others" and that
you give credit where it's due. Be prepared that your interviewer
will probably have worked with or met one of the people you have
worked with, so have something nice to say about them.

One of the best advice I've heard about job interviews is that you
basically have the job when you walk into the room; you lose it based
on whether or not the interviewer feels you will be a good fit on the
team. Someone who doesn't give props to the people they work with
raises a red flag.

On 22-Feb-08, at 1:10 PM, Ari Feldman wrote:

> for job interviews and/or pitching a client this is an absolute
> must. sage
> advice.
>
> layout is subjective but i have my online for reference in an email
> and
> because i have a printer-friendly version of my online portfolio,
> which is
> data-drive, i can easily generate a printed version of a portfolio
> deck via
> Acrobat's web print feature or via a script.
>
>
> On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 2:21 PM, JenniferVignone <
> jennifervignone at earthlink.net> wrote:
>
>> Everyone should have a portfolio in print form.
>> It just speaks to a level of preparedness and covering as many
>> bases as
>> possible, which exemplifies what this type of work is about. My
>> online
>> presence runs a gamut of the different things I do. I am less
>> likely to
>> update that for each and every meeting. The printed book is easier
>> to play
>> around with. Also, in the event that you have am agreement with a
>> client not
>> to post samples, but can show them (and not leave anything behind)
>> the print
>> portfolio is where this will occur.
>>

24 Feb 2008 - 12:22pm
Christine Boese
2006

Just to throw things in a slightly different direction, I'm wondering if
folks on this list have an answer to this problem I've run into with both
online and electronic portfolios:

Do you find a danger, without a walk-thru, that the person you want to see
the portfolio doesn't get to the full depth of what you have to show?

I see this as almost an inherent problem with interactive navigation and the
limitation of the screen boundaries to be able to convey what sort of
material is behind any given screen (this is also a problem with non-fiction
e-books and electronic textbooks, as compared to their physical
counter-parts).

It is a reason I have pared back my online portfolio to its simplest
elements while keeping a full chronological archive (in a database) of
materials that can be linked to for different uses. And it is the reason, as
many here have noted, that I tend to trust my print version for greatest
persuasive effect.

What the screen and interactive links can hide is "heft" or substance. Thus,
with interactive textbooks, for instance, I've found students are quick to
say "Why are you testing us on X? X wasn't in our assigned reading." Then
when you point to it in the assigned reading, they say, "I never saw that
part."

I've abandoned certain really excellent online, interactive textbooks
because of this problem. If the student had had a physical textbook, she
would know he missed the five pages of summary review material and questions
to consider at the end of the chapter because she would be able to SEE the
physical pages behind the pages where she had stopped reading.

Students can't gauge the difference between a 400-page online textbook and a
200-page online textbook from electronic interfaces. They may understand
that one book has more depth, more resources, better appendixes, more case
studies, but hidden behind the flat screen, the depth and heft is hidden.
The two works appear to be the same because they both are entered through a
similar interface following similar interface design and content
organization rules.

And I've run into the same issue with electronic portfolios. Perhaps the
constant in this case is that the people you are usually showing your
portfolio to are time-stressed and skimming. Maybe your mileage will vary on
this factor, but it is the one thing I've consistently run into, which is
that few people I show portfolios to look at portfolios with the kind of
detailed examination I'm used to giving portfolios myself (as a former
teacher, helping my students develop good portfolios, grading them).

So anyway, these days, I'm putting more energy into the print presentation,
since I have my chronological database to back everything up. And I'm
working up two versions: first, a brief one to customize for a particular
job/project need, and a thicker one, with more substantial textual
documentation etc., in case I run into someone who isn't skimming and wants
to examine the depth of the work, the level of the reasoning, the method of
the usability testing, etc.

My feeling is that one without the other only tells half the story, and even
if all an interviewer does is just lift and feel the heft of the thicker
book, at least the fact that I have that level of work to back me up, to dip
into as questions arise, conveys more about my work than if I hid that depth
behind a single screen interface on the front of a database.

I'm curious if others have noticed this effect.

Chris

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 5:00 PM, Cindy Alvarez <cindy at cindyalvarez.com>
wrote:

> I'd agree with that. Lots of products don't make it to market for reasons
> well beyond the designer's control - and lots of products have a finished
> state that was nothing like the designer's intent because of exec ex
> machina. HOW you worked - researched, prioritized, sketched, tested -
> given whatever your particular constraints were, is what I need to know.
>
> Come to think of it, that may explain partially why I get inferior
> feedback
> from people presenting paper portfolios in-person -- many people seem
> reluctant to talk about their constraints (perhaps feeling that it will
> sound like making excuses?). All design projects have constraints - and
> sometimes those are HUGE, impassable constraints - but at least you can
> talk
> about what you had a chance to do, what workarounds you achieved, and what
> you would've done under better circumstances.
>
> Cindy
> PS - I'd rather see an online (or offline) portfolio with minimal
> visuals/deliverables but great ANALYSIS, than to have you bring in
> deliverables that I suspect you shouldn't be showing me since I'm not
> under
> NDA. ("All rights reserved - For internal distribution only" in the
> footer
> = bad idea to show that you don't respect your former employers' IP.)
>
>
>
>

24 Feb 2008 - 1:26pm
Mark Schraad
2006

Christine,

I completely agree with your concerns. To me, it is like emailing
your design work to a client. I always want to be there to gauge
reaction and tell the story. Presentation of both work, and portfolio
(because it is really very similar) are about setting the stage with
criteria and the problem definition, and then explaining the solution
and results. I always want that to be a conversation, and not subject
to my writing skill or the viewers interpretation.

This is NOT a fashion show or a beauty pageant.

Mark

On Feb 24, 2008, at 12:22 PM, Christine Boese wrote:

> Just to throw things in a slightly different direction, I'm
> wondering if
> folks on this list have an answer to this problem I've run into
> with both
> online and electronic portfolios:
>
> Do you find a danger, without a walk-thru, that the person you want
> to see
> the portfolio doesn't get to the full depth of what you have to show?
>
> I see this as almost an inherent problem with interactive
> navigation and the
> limitation of the screen boundaries to be able to convey what sort of
> material is behind any given screen (this is also a problem with
> non-fiction
> e-books and electronic textbooks, as compared to their physical
> counter-parts).

27 Feb 2008 - 10:36am
John Vaughan - ...
2004

WEB-BASED PORTFOLIO:
- Credible (Use the medium to demonstrate your skills)
- Scalable (Grow any info you want)
- Extensible (Go in any direction you want)
- Insightful (Gee, you can actually create cross-reference "links")
- Updatable (Well, duh...)
- Virtual (Use it as presentational support for f2f interviews; Client can
use it to get to know you offline - and share you with other stakeholders;
Web presence = "my electronic agent")

PRINT VS ELECTRONIC: I hate to re-work my material for different media and
so have little use for "limited" platforms (like PDF & Visio). Right now
HTML is my preferred one-size-fits-all solution. net/net: Paper's a nice
takeaway - tho it captures dynamic electronic media poorly and there are
potential confidentiality issues. I bring paper collateral only if it's the
actual DELIVERABLE medium: i.e. I want to strut my Documentation and Client
Presentation stuff. I may SHOW a client print collateral from another
client engagement, but I LEAVE A COPY of that print material only if I've
"genericized" it or believe that there are no propriety issues.

BEST OF BOTH WORLDS: You can click on my Resume link
(http://www.jcvtcs.com/JohnVaughanResume.html - Try it) to open a
"print-like" popup version of my resume that also links to the appropriate
parts of my website. I apologize for the "Not linked to page on site yet."
message on a couple of the more recent engagements.

ARI FELDMAN: "i agree with this but websites are not permanent - i worked on
many and quite a few no longer exist or exist as they did when i was
involved."
JV: Too true. Capture those legacy sites with a few well-chosen
screenshots and some salient points re Process and you'll have them forever
on your website.

PROCESS: Yep. That's what clients want to see (and it's the not-so-secret
agenda of our guild). Context, context, context. Tell'em what you have to
OFFER http://www.jcvtcs.com/-services/index-service.html and HOWyou think
http://www.jcvtcs.com/-understanding/index-understanding.html.

John

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