Grass roots User Experience

14 Nov 2006 - 7:47pm
7 years ago
2 replies
298 reads
Riki Josepf
2006

In looking at so many of the postings here and industry trends in general, it seems that User Experience is taking two main routes, design and technology. My background in User Experience is completely organic and I have found that my greatest strength lies in User Advocacy, and being able to translate user needs to various audiences (designers, tech, business, client, etc.)

In 2002 I helped grow a group at Schwab that developed design standards, conducted heuristic reviews, and worked on project teams to ensure that requirements and product work reflected user needs. I am always tryingto assess the landscape and look for these types of consultative User Experience/Direction roles at larger corporations (read *not* consultancies).

Is anyone familiar with companies that have disciplines like this? What are these roles typically called? I tend to lean towards financial services but have had great success on internal company work as well (Intranet).

Any insights would be great, there are just so many names for the type of work that I do and it would be nice to better understand what types of companies are open to a background like mine to bring innovation to their UE practices.

Thanks!

Comments

15 Nov 2006 - 12:47am
carl myhill
2006

I saw a job posting at microsoft recently for an evangelist, perhaps they
need you...
http://www.microsoft.com/cze/careers/prilezitosti/pozice/enthusiast_evangelist.mspx

On 14/11/06, Riki Josepf <mitzirik at yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> In looking at so many of the postings here and industry trends in general,
> it seems that User Experience is taking two main routes, design and
> technology. My background in User Experience is completely organic and I
> have found that my greatest strength lies in User Advocacy, and being able
> to translate user needs to various audiences (designers, tech, business,
> client, etc.)
>
> In 2002 I helped grow a group at Schwab that developed design standards,
> conducted heuristic reviews, and worked on project teams to ensure that
> requirements and product work reflected user needs. I am always tryingto
> assess the landscape and look for these types of consultative User
> Experience/Direction roles at larger corporations (read *not*
> consultancies).
>
> Is anyone familiar with companies that have disciplines like this? What
> are these roles typically called? I tend to lean towards financial services
> but have had great success on internal company work as well (Intranet).
>
> Any insights would be great, there are just so many names for the type of
> work that I do and it would be nice to better understand what types of
> companies are open to a background like mine to bring innovation to their UE
> practices.
>
> Thanks!
>
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15 Nov 2006 - 10:52am
Michael Micheletti
2006

Expeditors International, based in Seattle, has an in-house group of
designers. Just checked and they have an opening now for a web dev, but
looks like no UI design positions. When I was there, my job title was "UI
Designer". The design group there was pretty successful with turning
requirements into design specifications and prototypes, and bridging gaps
between business and development communities. Developers there liked getting
on a project that a designer was assigned to because they knew they could
count on a clean spec and a working front-end prototype, and that the
projects just seemed to go more smoothly with less rework. The business
community there also seemed happy with the results. Expeditors was a good
company to work for, if a bit on the formal side (neckties all the time).
They're in the logistics business, and the web-based applications are
complex and interconnected. Some hard problems to solve. Hope this is what
you're looking for,

Michael Micheletti

On 11/14/06, Riki Josepf <mitzirik at yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>
> Is anyone familiar with companies that have disciplines like this? What
> are these roles typically called? I tend to lean towards financial services
> but have had great success on internal company work as well (Intranet).
>

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