JOB: Interaction designer for GoDaddy.com (Scottsdale, AZ)

27 Nov 2006 - 7:33pm
7 years ago
10 replies
770 reads
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

GoDaddy.com is currently looking for a UI Designer / Usability Specialist.
This is an exciting opportunity to join our team and help us design and
develop better user experiences. This position will design wireframes, task
flows, interactions, and individual screens, perform usability tests,
provide feedback on web sites and web products to the development group
based on experience, research, analysis, user testing, and more. Candidate
must be able to understand, design, and optimize workflow, user interaction,
and layout, as well as translate written specifications into workable
designs.

A portfolio or other examples of relevant work are strongly suggested.

Candidates should have a thorough appreciation and understanding of web
technologies and trends, usability techniques, and usable interface
solutions. This position will work with development teams, graphic
designers, and product managers. Primary platforms will be websites and
web-enabled applications, although work with client/server applications is
possible.

Primary Responsibilities:

•Produce wireframes, task flow diagrams, storyboards, paper and interactive
prototypes, and handle the design and administration of usability testing
and surveys, and interaction design documentation.
•Work closely with business analysts, designers, and developers to
understand business requirements and user's goals and objectives.
•Provide expertise and support to the development teams while creating or
adjusting user interfaces. In addition, the candidate will drive usability
evaluation efforts with the goal of analyzing and translating usability
evaluation outcomes into design improvements.
•Devise strategies to solicit customer participation in on-site and remote
usability testing and work with those customers over the phone and in person
to coordinate, execute, evaluate, etc. their testing.
Skills/Requirements
Skills/Requirements:

•Candidates must have experience working in interaction/interface design or
as a human factors resource in a web-based software development environment.
•Experience with usability testing (planning, administration, analysis and
documentation).
•Experience in the design of intuitive, user-centered application interfaces
for Web-applications.
•Ability to work under tight deadlines and quickly create workable designs
(whiteboard sketches, wireframes, etc.).
•Familiarity with web implementation methods and constraints.
•Solid application design skills with an eye for detail and the ability to
translate ideas into tangible design specifications.
•Excellent verbal and written communication skills. Ability to effectively
describe and present design ideas and recommendations to various contacts.
•Experience collaborating with analyst, design and development teams.
•Proven ability to meet deadlines.
•Comfortable with emerging technologies and fast paced development cycles.
•Willingness to learn new technologies.

We offer competitive salary, 100% employer paid medical and dental (for
employees), three weeks of vacation available in your first year, 401(k) and
educational assistance.

If interested, please reply to "rhoekman at godaddy dot com" and use
"Interaction design position" as the subject. Thanks ...

Comments

28 Nov 2006 - 2:00am
Nathan
2006

FINALLY! It's about time!

> Subject: [IxDA Discuss] JOB: Interaction designer for GoDaddy.com
> (Scottsdale, AZ)
> To: IDA <discuss at ixda.org>
> Message-ID:
> <93e5ba540611271633q74460368o951673a8a300f261 at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=WINDOWS-1252; format=flowed
>
> GoDaddy.com is currently looking for a UI Designer / Usability
> Specialist.
> This is an exciting opportunity to join our team and help us design
> and
> develop better user experiences. This position will design
> wireframes, task
> flows, interactions, and individual screens, perform usability tests,
> provide feedback on web sites and web products to the development
> group
> based on experience, research, analysis, user testing, and more.
> Candidate
> must be able to understand, design, and optimize workflow, user
> interaction,
> and layout, as well as translate written specifications into workable
> designs.
>
> A portfolio or other examples of relevant work are strongly suggested.
>
> Candidates should have a thorough appreciation and understanding of
> web
> technologies and trends, usability techniques, and usable interface
> solutions. This position will work with development teams, graphic
> designers, and product managers. Primary platforms will be websites
> and
> web-enabled applications, although work with client/server
> applications is
> possible.
>
> Primary Responsibilities:
>
> ?Produce wireframes, task flow diagrams, storyboards, paper and
> interactive
> prototypes, and handle the design and administration of usability
> testing
> and surveys, and interaction design documentation.
> ?Work closely with business analysts, designers, and developers to
> understand business requirements and user's goals and objectives.
> ?Provide expertise and support to the development teams while
> creating or
> adjusting user interfaces. In addition, the candidate will drive
> usability
> evaluation efforts with the goal of analyzing and translating
> usability
> evaluation outcomes into design improvements.
> ?Devise strategies to solicit customer participation in on-site and
> remote
> usability testing and work with those customers over the phone and
> in person
> to coordinate, execute, evaluate, etc. their testing.
> Skills/Requirements
> Skills/Requirements:
>
> ?Candidates must have experience working in interaction/interface
> design or
> as a human factors resource in a web-based software development
> environment.
> ?Experience with usability testing (planning, administration,
> analysis and
> documentation).
> ?Experience in the design of intuitive, user-centered application
> interfaces
> for Web-applications.
> ?Ability to work under tight deadlines and quickly create workable
> designs
> (whiteboard sketches, wireframes, etc.).
> ?Familiarity with web implementation methods and constraints.
> ?Solid application design skills with an eye for detail and the
> ability to
> translate ideas into tangible design specifications.
> ?Excellent verbal and written communication skills. Ability to
> effectively
> describe and present design ideas and recommendations to various
> contacts.
> ?Experience collaborating with analyst, design and development teams.
> ?Proven ability to meet deadlines.
> ?Comfortable with emerging technologies and fast paced development
> cycles.
> ?Willingness to learn new technologies.
>
> We offer competitive salary, 100% employer paid medical and dental
> (for
> employees), three weeks of vacation available in your first year,
> 401(k) and
> educational assistance.
>
> If interested, please reply to "rhoekman at godaddy dot com" and use
> "Interaction design position" as the subject. Thanks ...
________________________________________________________

Nathan Shedroff WEB www.nathan.com
Experience Strategist

22 Cleveland Street NET nathan at nathan.com
San Francisco, CA 94103

28 Nov 2006 - 11:25am
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

Do you mean it's about time GD got itself a team?

I started the Usability team about 8 months ago. Still only two interaction
designers at the moment, but I have approval for two more, because
management has seen the light. Give me some time.

Have you checked out the new Domain Control Center? I did that.

-r-

On 11/28/06, Nathan <nathan at nathan.com> wrote:
>
> FINALLY! It's about time!
>
> > Subject: [IxDA Discuss] JOB: Interaction designer for GoDaddy.com
> > (Scottsdale, AZ)
> > To: IDA <discuss at ixda.org>
> > Message-ID:
> > <93e5ba540611271633q74460368o951673a8a300f261 at mail.gmail.com>
> > Content-Type: text/plain; charset=WINDOWS-1252; format=flowed
> >
> > GoDaddy.com is currently looking for a UI Designer / Usability
> > Specialist.
> > This is an exciting opportunity to join our team and help us design
> > and
> > develop better user experiences. This position will design
> > wireframes, task
> > flows, interactions, and individual screens, perform usability tests,
> > provide feedback on web sites and web products to the development
> > group
> > based on experience, research, analysis, user testing, and more.
> > Candidate
> > must be able to understand, design, and optimize workflow, user
> > interaction,
> > and layout, as well as translate written specifications into workable
> > designs.
> >
> > A portfolio or other examples of relevant work are strongly suggested.
> >
> > Candidates should have a thorough appreciation and understanding of
> > web
> > technologies and trends, usability techniques, and usable interface
> > solutions. This position will work with development teams, graphic
> > designers, and product managers. Primary platforms will be websites
> > and
> > web-enabled applications, although work with client/server
> > applications is
> > possible.
> >
> > Primary Responsibilities:
> >
> > ?Produce wireframes, task flow diagrams, storyboards, paper and
> > interactive
> > prototypes, and handle the design and administration of usability
> > testing
> > and surveys, and interaction design documentation.
> > ?Work closely with business analysts, designers, and developers to
> > understand business requirements and user's goals and objectives.
> > ?Provide expertise and support to the development teams while
> > creating or
> > adjusting user interfaces. In addition, the candidate will drive
> > usability
> > evaluation efforts with the goal of analyzing and translating
> > usability
> > evaluation outcomes into design improvements.
> > ?Devise strategies to solicit customer participation in on-site and
> > remote
> > usability testing and work with those customers over the phone and
> > in person
> > to coordinate, execute, evaluate, etc. their testing.
> > Skills/Requirements
> > Skills/Requirements:
> >
> > ?Candidates must have experience working in interaction/interface
> > design or
> > as a human factors resource in a web-based software development
> > environment.
> > ?Experience with usability testing (planning, administration,
> > analysis and
> > documentation).
> > ?Experience in the design of intuitive, user-centered application
> > interfaces
> > for Web-applications.
> > ?Ability to work under tight deadlines and quickly create workable
> > designs
> > (whiteboard sketches, wireframes, etc.).
> > ?Familiarity with web implementation methods and constraints.
> > ?Solid application design skills with an eye for detail and the
> > ability to
> > translate ideas into tangible design specifications.
> > ?Excellent verbal and written communication skills. Ability to
> > effectively
> > describe and present design ideas and recommendations to various
> > contacts.
> > ?Experience collaborating with analyst, design and development teams.
> > ?Proven ability to meet deadlines.
> > ?Comfortable with emerging technologies and fast paced development
> > cycles.
> > ?Willingness to learn new technologies.
> >
> > We offer competitive salary, 100% employer paid medical and dental
> > (for
> > employees), three weeks of vacation available in your first year,
> > 401(k) and
> > educational assistance.
> >
> > If interested, please reply to "rhoekman at godaddy dot com" and use
> > "Interaction design position" as the subject. Thanks ...
> ________________________________________________________
>
> Nathan Shedroff WEB www.nathan.com
> Experience Strategist
>
> 22 Cleveland Street NET nathan at nathan.com
> San Francisco, CA 94103
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
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28 Nov 2006 - 12:08pm
Todd Warfel
2003

I think he means it's about time GD employ some IDs there. I'd
concur. That's where I manage my domains, but I absolutely dread
going into that control panel for managing stuff (sorry, Robert) -
it's overcrowded and way too much work. Everything is multiple steps.
It's still very outdated and seems like it's built on 2000
technology. Yes, three screens is two too many.

That's a perfect opportunity area for some RIA activity - one screen
with seamless transitions. And it doesn't remember my state. I have a
few dozen domains there. Every single time I come in, I select "View
All" so I don't have to paginate. There's no need for a complicated
preferences screen - just remember the state - the way I set it last
time.

The same goes for their domain registration process. I understand the
probable business need to "advertise" extra stuff, but there needs to
be more balance between quick checkout and promoting additional
services. What's with the 5-7 step checkout process and "hiding" the
"No thanks, just get me out of here" button? Is the goal to trick the
customer or show them valued services? Because it's coming off as the
former.

Now, before you go dismissing my comments or concerns as "Oh, he's
just having a Monday..." it's Tuesday ;). and it can be done. I know
it's tough to balance those two, but we've done it for several
clients in the past - so, it's totally possible to balance those two.

On Nov 28, 2006, at 11:25 AM, Robert Hoekman, Jr. wrote:

> Do you mean it's about time GD got itself a team?
>
> I started the Usability team about 8 months ago. Still only two
> interaction
> designers at the moment, but I have approval for two more, because
> management has seen the light. Give me some time.
>
> Have you checked out the new Domain Control Center? I did that.
>
> -r-

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
Partner, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | designing and usability consulting
--------------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
--------------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

28 Nov 2006 - 12:54pm
Nathan
2006

Todd said it better than I could have. I would add: I can only login
from specific pages--not the homepage. There's little linkage between
similar things (like the list of domains and the domain info details
for one selected in the list). And, the truly odd checkbox as a
selector highlight.

Honestly, I didn't realize anything had changed (though I hadn't been
back in the last 6 months). If it wasn't such a pain to move domains,
I would move to another service entirely--just because of the interface.

Robert, I hope they're empowering you to make drastic changes.

N

On Nov 28, 2006, at 9:08 AM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:

> I think he means it's about time GD employ some IDs there. I'd
> concur. That's where I manage my domains, but I absolutely dread
> going into that control panel for managing stuff (sorry, Robert) -
> it's overcrowded and way too much work. Everything is multiple
> steps. It's still very outdated and seems like it's built on 2000
> technology. Yes, three screens is two too many.
>
> That's a perfect opportunity area for some RIA activity - one
> screen with seamless transitions. And it doesn't remember my state.
> I have a few dozen domains there. Every single time I come in, I
> select "View All" so I don't have to paginate. There's no need for
> a complicated preferences screen - just remember the state - the
> way I set it last time.
>
> The same goes for their domain registration process. I understand
> the probable business need to "advertise" extra stuff, but there
> needs to be more balance between quick checkout and promoting
> additional services. What's with the 5-7 step checkout process and
> "hiding" the "No thanks, just get me out of here" button? Is the
> goal to trick the customer or show them valued services? Because
> it's coming off as the former.
>
> Now, before you go dismissing my comments or concerns as "Oh, he's
> just having a Monday..." it's Tuesday ;). and it can be done. I
> know it's tough to balance those two, but we've done it for several
> clients in the past - so, it's totally possible to balance those two.
>
> On Nov 28, 2006, at 11:25 AM, Robert Hoekman, Jr. wrote:
>
>> Do you mean it's about time GD got itself a team?
>>
>> I started the Usability team about 8 months ago. Still only two
>> interaction
>> designers at the moment, but I have approval for two more, because
>> management has seen the light. Give me some time.
>>
>> Have you checked out the new Domain Control Center? I did that.
>>
>> -r-
>
>
>
> Cheers!
>
> Todd Zaki Warfel
> Partner, Design & Usability Specialist
> Messagefirst | designing and usability consulting
> --------------------------------------
> Contact Info
> Voice: (215) 825-7423
> Email: todd at messagefirst.com
> AIM: twarfel at mac.com
> Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
> --------------------------------------
> In theory, theory and practice are the same.
> In practice, they are not.
>
>

________________________________________________________

Nathan Shedroff WEB www.nathan.com
Experience Strategist

22 Cleveland Street NET nathan at nathan.com
San Francisco, CA 94103

28 Nov 2006 - 12:59pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

> I think he means it's about time GD employ some IDs there. I'd concur.
> That's where I manage my domains, but I absolutely dread going into that
> control panel for managing stuff (sorry, Robert) - it's overcrowded and way
> too much work. Everything is multiple steps. It's still very outdated and
> seems like it's built on 2000 technology. Yes, three screens is two too
> many.
>

Some of our customers are unhappy with the new version. In fact, some of
them downright hate it. Most, however, have written in rave reviews, and our
testing and logging has shown its has improved things significantly. That
said, there are still quite a few things I'm not happy with in that app,
namely the state-memory issues (which I did bring up, btw) and the fact that
so many thing were not implemented the way I intended. Those "drop-in"
dialogs, for example, are supposed to slide in/out without a page refresh,
to improve context. As it is, there are a lot of things that didn't turn out
the way I wanted. GD is still very much a developer-driven company, and
it'll be a long time before that changes, but I'm making massive amounts of
progress.

The same goes for their domain registration process. I understand the
> probable business need to "advertise" extra stuff, but there needs to be
> more balance between quick checkout and promoting additional services.
> What's with the 5-7 step checkout process and "hiding" the "No thanks, just
> get me out of here" button? Is the goal to trick the customer or show them
> valued services? Because it's coming off as the former.
>

Sadly, I have absolutely nothing to do with the corporate site. Marketing
has control over that one.

Now, before you go dismissing my comments or concerns as "Oh, he's just
> having a Monday..." it's Tuesday ;). and it can be done.
>

I'm well aware of the possibilities.

-r-

28 Nov 2006 - 1:22pm
Todd Warfel
2003

Just out of curiosity, what kind of testing was done?

On Nov 28, 2006, at 12:59 PM, Robert Hoekman, Jr. wrote:

> and our testing and logging has shown its has improved things
> significantly.

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
Partner, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | designing and usability consulting
--------------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
--------------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

28 Nov 2006 - 3:10pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

Check out the new Domain Center and let me know what you think (offlist if
you'd prefer).

I see your point about using a checkbox as a selector highlight, but if it's
in the context I think you mean, I felt it made more sense to offer an
explicit control for the selection of multiple objects rather than rely on
the user's knowledge of Shift-clicking.

They are empowering me to do a lot, but it's a long process, as I'm sure you
know. I've got the managers mandating that everything has to go through my
team now, but haven't yet managed to make a true cultural shift. I'm making
huge progress, but that sort of thing definitely does not happen overnight.
As I said, I have approval to add more people to the team, which would get
me 1 interaction designer for every 2-3 major apps. Significantly better,
but I'm not there yet. The managers do want to start to make that cultural
shift, it's just slow.

-r-

On 11/28/06, Nathan <nathan at nathan.com> wrote:
>
> Todd said it better than I could have. I would add: I can only login from
> specific pages--not the homepage. There's little linkage between similar
> things (like the list of domains and the domain info details for one
> selected in the list). And, the truly odd checkbox as a selector highlight.
> Honestly, I didn't realize anything had changed (though I hadn't been back
> in the last 6 months). If it wasn't such a pain to move domains, I would
> move to another service entirely--just because of the interface.
>
> Robert, I hope they're empowering you to make drastic changes.
>
> N
>
> On Nov 28, 2006, at 9:08 AM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:
>
> I think he means it's about time GD employ some IDs there. I'd concur.
> That's where I manage my domains, but I absolutely dread going into that
> control panel for managing stuff (sorry, Robert) - it's overcrowded and way
> too much work. Everything is multiple steps. It's still very outdated and
> seems like it's built on 2000 technology. Yes, three screens is two too
> many.
> That's a perfect opportunity area for some RIA activity - one screen with
> seamless transitions. And it doesn't remember my state. I have a few dozen
> domains there. Every single time I come in, I select "View All" so I don't
> have to paginate. There's no need for a complicated preferences screen -
> just remember the state - the way I set it last time.
>
> The same goes for their domain registration process. I understand the
> probable business need to "advertise" extra stuff, but there needs to be
> more balance between quick checkout and promoting additional services.
> What's with the 5-7 step checkout process and "hiding" the "No thanks, just
> get me out of here" button? Is the goal to trick the customer or show them
> valued services? Because it's coming off as the former.
>
> Now, before you go dismissing my comments or concerns as "Oh, he's just
> having a Monday..." it's Tuesday ;). and it can be done. I know it's tough
> to balance those two, but we've done it for several clients in the past -
> so, it's totally possible to balance those two.
>
> On Nov 28, 2006, at 11:25 AM, Robert Hoekman, Jr. wrote:
>
> Do you mean it's about time GD got itself a team?
>
> I started the Usability team about 8 months ago. Still only two
> interaction
> designers at the moment, but I have approval for two more, because
> management has seen the light. Give me some time.
>
> Have you checked out the new Domain Control Center? I did that.
>
> -r-
>
>
>
>
> Cheers!
>
> Todd Zaki Warfel
> Partner, Design & Usability Specialist
> Messagefirst | designing and usability consulting
> --------------------------------------
> *Contact Info*
> Voice: (215) 825-7423Email: todd at messagefirst.com
> AIM: twarfel at mac.com
> Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
> --------------------------------------
> In theory, theory and practice are the same.
> In practice, they are not.
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________
>
> *Nathan Shedroff* WEB www.nathan.com
> Experience Strategist
>
> 22 Cleveland Street NET nathan at nathan.com
> San Francisco, CA 94103
>
>
>

28 Nov 2006 - 3:22pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

We did a decently large usability study with internal staff (call center
employees) and external customers (with and without prior experience with
the domain control center) in which each user was asked to complete common
tasks, such as DNS switches, contact info updates, locking, etc. The
results, which were quantified based on a pre- and post-survey of each user
using a Likert scale, were that the app met or exceeded user expectations on
every point.

We also gather passive feedback from anyone willing to click the little
Feedback button and fill out a form. Most feedback is very positive. And
honestly, much of the negative feedback has been from differences between
the design and the implementation. As in, if implemented as designed, the
issues should mostly be resolved.

Some of the feedback, of course, is from people who are simply resistant to
change. I understand that, because it was a dramatic change which introduced
a significant learning curve for veteran customers, but in the same breath,
most of these are the same people who thought there was nothing wrong with
the old version of the domain center.

-r-

On 11/28/06, Todd Zaki Warfel <lists at toddwarfel.com> wrote:
>
> Just out of curiosity, what kind of testing was done?
> On Nov 28, 2006, at 12:59 PM, Robert Hoekman, Jr. wrote:
>
> and our testing and logging has shown its has improved things
> significantly.
>
>
>
>
> Cheers!
>
> Todd Zaki Warfel
> Partner, Design & Usability Specialist
> Messagefirst | designing and usability consulting
> --------------------------------------
> *Contact Info*
> Voice: (215) 825-7423Email: todd at messagefirst.com
> AIM: twarfel at mac.com
> Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
> --------------------------------------
> In theory, theory and practice are the same.
> In practice, they are not.
>
>
>

29 Nov 2006 - 9:24am
Jared M. Spool
2003

Robert,

Sounds like your doing some great things at GoDaddy. However...

On Nov 28, 2006, at 3:22 PM, Robert Hoekman, Jr. wrote:

> Some of the feedback, of course, is from people who are simply
> resistant to
> change. I understand that, because it was a dramatic change which
> introduced
> a significant learning curve for veteran customers, but in the same
> breath,
> most of these are the same people who thought there was nothing
> wrong with
> the old version of the domain center.

... this sounds like the common sentiment that some people will
always hate it when we change things and that's just a fact of life
in design.

When are we going to realize that we have to not only design changes,
but design *for* change?

http://www.uie.com/articles/embraceable_change/

Just a thought...

Jared

Jared M. Spool
User Interface Engineering
510 Turnpike St., Suite 102, North Andover, MA 01845
e: jspool at uie.com p: +1 978 327 5561
http://uie.com Blog: http://uie.com/brainsparks

29 Nov 2006 - 11:06am
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

Indeed, and this is something I've thought about but not yet been able to
convince the dev teams to implement. Right now, they deploy the new version
of an app to a small percentage of the customer base, then wait for feedback
to roll in, make some tweaks, and roll out to a bigger portion of the
customer base, until everyone has switched.

No one is warned, and no one is given the choice to switch to the new
version, or the choice to switch back until things are smoothed out. That's
where the key is, and I'm definitely pushing for it.

-r-

On 11/29/06, Jared M. Spool <jspool at uie.com> wrote:
>
> Robert,
>
> Sounds like your doing some great things at GoDaddy. However...
>
> On Nov 28, 2006, at 3:22 PM, Robert Hoekman, Jr. wrote:
>
> > Some of the feedback, of course, is from people who are simply
> > resistant to
> > change. I understand that, because it was a dramatic change which
> > introduced
> > a significant learning curve for veteran customers, but in the same
> > breath,
> > most of these are the same people who thought there was nothing
> > wrong with
> > the old version of the domain center.
>
> ... this sounds like the common sentiment that some people will
> always hate it when we change things and that's just a fact of life
> in design.
>
> When are we going to realize that we have to not only design changes,
> but design *for* change?
>
> http://www.uie.com/articles/embraceable_change/
>
> Just a thought...
>
> Jared
>
>
> Jared M. Spool
> User Interface Engineering
> 510 Turnpike St., Suite 102, North Andover, MA 01845
> e: jspool at uie.com p: +1 978 327 5561
> http://uie.com Blog: http://uie.com/brainsparks
>
>
>
>

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