Designing for change (was: JOB: Interaction designer for GoDaddy.com)

30 Nov 2006 - 6:17pm
7 years ago
1 reply
667 reads
Doug Murray
2005

Schwab.com has done a pretty good job of managing change on their site. They
announced the pending change on the "positions" page months before they made the
change, complete with a link to see the new page (not a screen shot, but an
actual page with your stocks). Now, months after the change, they still have a
link back to the old page.

The changeover was done in the light of day, not overnight. It was introduced
and explained, and users had plenty of time to get used to it. Personally, I
love the new page and always went right to the new version after it was
introduced. But, I guess some aren't as receptive to change when it comes to
their finances. Schwab accounted for the receptive and the reticent in the
change.

- Doug

Robert Hoekman, Jr. wrote:

Indeed, and this is something I've thought about but not yet been able to
convince the dev teams to implement. Right now, they deploy the new version
of an app to a small percentage of the customer base, then wait for feedback
to roll in, make some tweaks, and roll out to a bigger portion of the
customer base, until everyone has switched.

No one is warned, and no one is given the choice to switch to the new
version, or the choice to switch back until things are smoothed out. That's
where the key is, and I'm definitely pushing for it.

-r-
On 11/29/06, Jared M. Spool <jspool at uie.com> wrote:
>
> Robert,
>
> Sounds like your doing some great things at GoDaddy. However...
>
> ... this sounds like the common sentiment that some people will
> always hate it when we change things and that's just a fact of life
> in design.
>
> When are we going to realize that we have to not only design changes,
> but design *for* change?
>
> http://www.uie.com/articles/embraceable_change/
>
> Just a thought...
>
> Jared

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Comments

7 Dec 2006 - 6:26pm
Adam Korman
2004

Several months ago Ameritrade did the same thing, for a pretty
dramatic change to the entire IA and most functions of their customer
site. They prominently announced the coming changes then allowed
people to try it out for a period of time (seems like a few weeks)
before making it the default UI. All along, they prominently
solicited feedback. It's several months later and you can still get
back to the old site (though I don't know why you would, it's been
such a vast improvement). This is a great model for how to do a major
change (especially when you're messing with something as personal as
peoples' money & stocks).

Unfortunately, since merging with TD Waterhouse, they've mangled the
site slightly by (a) introducing some weird navigation idioms
(clicking on a tab doesn't navigate... you have to click on a link
under the tab -- drives me nuts) and (b) turning everything green,
making it hard to distinguish visual design elements from data. It's
like they don't know that green and red are heavily coded with
meaning when you present financial data.

-Adam

On Nov 30, 2006, at 3:17 PM, Doug Murray wrote:

> Schwab.com has done a pretty good job of managing change on their
> site. They
> announced the pending change on the "positions" page months before
> they made the
> change, complete with a link to see the new page (not a screen
> shot, but an
> actual page with your stocks). Now, months after the change, they
> still have a
> link back to the old page.
>
> The changeover was done in the light of day, not overnight. It was
> introduced
> and explained, and users had plenty of time to get used to it.
> Personally, I
> love the new page and always went right to the new version after it
> was
> introduced. But, I guess some aren't as receptive to change when it
> comes to
> their finances. Schwab accounted for the receptive and the reticent
> in the
> change.
>
> - Doug
>
> Robert Hoekman, Jr. wrote:
>
> No one is warned, and no one is given the choice to switch to the new
> version, or the choice to switch back until things are smoothed
> out. That's
> where the key is, and I'm definitely pushing for it.

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