pattern or feature inventory

11 Dec 2006 - 11:14pm
7 years ago
2 replies
473 reads
Jay Morgan
2006

ia/IAs and d/Designers,
<no apologies for the cross-post>

Has any of you ever created a graphical inventory of features, design
patterns, or functional elements? If so, please share learnings or
examples. I'd like to hear what format you used, how you presented it, and
what worked or didn't?

I'm specifically considering an inventory of competitors websites. In this
case, if I cataloged patterns, I wouldn't be listing the explanation found
on a usual pattern library, but showing how they visually accomplish
something or behaviorally execute a transition.

Thank you.
--
Jay A. Morgan
jayamorgan at gmail

Comments

11 Dec 2006 - 11:25pm
Navneet Nair
2004

Jeniffer Tidwell pattern website (http://www.time-tripper.com/uipatterns/)
and the accompanying book
(http://www.amazon.com/Designing-Interfaces-Jenifer-Tidwell/dp/0596008031)
is a good one. Also there is the 'Design of Sites' by Dyune et al (just
wrote a review for it:
http://enterframe.blogspot.com/2006/12/book-review-design-of-sites.html)

Cheers
Navneet- Show quoted text -

On 12/12/06, Jay Morgan < jayamorgan at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> ia/IAs and d/Designers,
> <no apologies for the cross-post>
>
> Has any of you ever created a graphical inventory of features, design
> patterns, or functional elements? If so, please share learnings or
> examples. I'd like to hear what format you used, how you presented it,
> and
> what worked or didn't?
>
>
>

--
----------------------------------------------------
Navneet Nair
Interaction Architect
onClipEvent: form follows function();
----------------------------------------------------
Website: http://www.onclipevent.com
Blog: http://enterframe.blogspot.com/

13 Dec 2006 - 10:11pm
Eric Scheid
2006

On 12/12/06 3:14 PM, "Jay Morgan" <jayamorgan at gmail.com> wrote:

> Has any of you ever created a graphical inventory of features, design
> patterns, or functional elements? If so, please share learnings or
> examples. I'd like to hear what format you used, how you presented it, and
> what worked or didn't?
>
> I'm specifically considering an inventory of competitors websites. In this
> case, if I cataloged patterns, I wouldn't be listing the explanation found
> on a usual pattern library, but showing how they visually accomplish
> something or behaviorally execute a transition.

The IAwiki has a page listing collections and galleries [1] of various
kinds. The pages linked were selected because they had, or tried to have,
many cited examples and consequent observations and analysis, and thus
leaned towards the raw-data end of the information spectrum as compared to
the various web-patterns collections [2] (which usually have the purpose of
presenting an abstraction or distilled pattern, with just some examples for
illustration purposes).

Some links may be afflicted with bit rot:

[1] http://IAwiki.net/GalleriesAndCollections
[2] http://iawiki.net/WebsitePatterns

Blurb Gallery:
Surveying the variety of ways we display introductions to longer articles...

"Print Friendly" links:
An informal survey of how sites present the link to the printer-friendly
alternative page

BreadCrumbs:
KeithInstone describes Location, Path & Attribute Breadcrumbs, with many
examples of different kinds.

Search Forms
LizDanzico has a review of different search interfaces

TimeLines
ErinMalone has a blog category for timelines

SiteMaps
http://www.cybergeography.org/atlas/web_sites.html

Better URLs for news/articles publishers
a day by day series examining good, bad, and ugly URLs

Widgetopia
Collection of Widgets and UI elements from various websites, with notation
of their sterling or plate metal qualities

Internationalization
Surveying the variety of ways we provide access to country and language
sites

Article Tool Icons
a comparison grid of those little article tools (like email this story) for
a dozen plus publishers

Demo of Library metasearch ...
Searching in multiple licensed and free databases, and has tabbed results.

Account Logins:
It's amazing how many different ways web sites handle sign-in pages. The
messaging of the interface, whether or not to sign up for an account, and
the HTML elements used are just some of the details that change drastically
from site to site.

e.

Syndicate content Get the feed