Sketching vs. prototyping-"Rough sketches"

27 Jan 2007 - 4:03am
7 years ago
4 replies
1016 reads
markhhoff@earth...
2006

Jared wrote:

Rough sketches are different than crudely-drawn diagrams. In fact,
many rough sketches are very well drawn: http://tinyurl.com/2a27ed

I¹ve been doing concept sketches for a lot of years, and the majority of
these examples are not rough sketches, no matter what the authors or Google
call them. The first example on Jared¹s site ( of the space station ) is
more like it. The second example is way to finished IMHO.

Transforming an idea in your head into a sketch with a few well placed lines
and scribbles on the back of a napkin that communicates is an art that
should be part of every designers toolkit, in whatever medium. Like a lot of
tactile, hands-on ways of working, sketching is becoming a lost art for many
of us. One of the downsides of our dependence on drawing software, is we
(and clients) get too focused on finished-looking products.

Better to spend five minutes to do five quick idea sketches, refine one that
seems to be working and then maybe fire up the drawing or prototyping
program. Adding to some of the previous ³Prototyping Tools² threads, rough
concept sketching and paper prototyping are very freeing and seem bring an
element of play and exploration to the process.

Not everyone¹s a visual thinker or can understand a ³rough² so audience and
level of understanding is important.

All these tools have there place in the process. See www.sketchup.com for an
interesting ³sketchy² program that uses lines that go through the endpoints
as Buxton mentions, but keep your number 2 pencil sharp.

Mark
--
Mark Hoffman < markhhoff at earthlink.net>
Mark Hoffman Associates, Inc.

Comments

30 Jan 2007 - 3:56pm
Diego Moya
2005

I remember seeing once a widget template (I think it was in Visio
format) that provided visual components with a rough, unfinished look.
The intent was to build interaction prototypes with a sketchy look, so
as to convey the idea of an incomplete application. By using it, you
could also concentrate on the user's workflow and avoid spending too
much time getting a pixel-perfect product in the first iterations.

Unfortunately, I haven't been able to locate that templates again. Has
anyone seen something similar?

On 27/01/07, Mark Hoffman <markhhoff en earthlink.net> wrote:
> Jared wrote:
> of us. One of the downsides of our dependence on drawing software, is we
> (and clients) get too focused on finished-looking products.
>

> All these tools have there place in the process. See www.sketchup.com for an
> interesting ³sketchy² program that uses lines that go through the endpoints
> as Buxton mentions, but keep your number 2 pencil sharp.

30 Jan 2007 - 4:01pm
Lana Carlene
2007

I would love to know about those too! Does anyone have a "sketchy" shape library? I miss my Illustrator line tools...
________________________________
Lana Carlene | Metia

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Diego Moya
Sent: Tuesday, January 30, 2007 12:57 PM
To: Mark Hoffman
Cc: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Sketching vs. prototyping-"Rough sketches"

I remember seeing once a widget template (I think it was in Visio
format) that provided visual components with a rough, unfinished look.
The intent was to build interaction prototypes with a sketchy look, so as to convey the idea of an incomplete application. By using it, you could also concentrate on the user's workflow and avoid spending too much time getting a pixel-perfect product in the first iterations.

Unfortunately, I haven't been able to locate that templates again. Has anyone seen something similar?

On 27/01/07, Mark Hoffman <markhhoff at earthlink.net> wrote:
> Jared wrote:
> of us. One of the downsides of our dependence on drawing software, is
> we (and clients) get too focused on finished-looking products.
>

> All these tools have there place in the process. See www.sketchup.com
> for an interesting ³sketchy² program that uses lines that go through
> the endpoints as Buxton mentions, but keep your number 2 pencil sharp.
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31 Jan 2007 - 5:09am
Adrian Howard
2005

On 30 Jan 2007, at 20:56, Diego Moya wrote:

> I remember seeing once a widget template (I think it was in Visio
> format) that provided visual components with a rough, unfinished look.
> The intent was to build interaction prototypes with a sketchy look, so
> as to convey the idea of an incomplete application. By using it, you
> could also concentrate on the user's workflow and avoid spending too
> much time getting a pixel-perfect product in the first iterations.
[snip]

Are you thinking of Napkin?

<http://napkinlaf.sourceforge.net/>

Adrian

31 Jan 2007 - 9:04pm
natekendrick
2005

Ahh, I love blanket statements!

Often (meaning 50% or more) drawing (could be screens for a website
or research drawing for a painting) in higher fidelity allows the
designer/artist to truly understand what makes something work/not work.

Sketching in broad strokes or poor fidelity may result in low
understanding of what works.

On Jan 27, 2007, at 1:03 AM, Mark Hoffman wrote:

> Jared wrote:
>
> Rough sketches are different than crudely-drawn diagrams. In fact,
> many rough sketches are very well drawn: http://tinyurl.com/2a27ed
>
> I’ve been doing concept sketches for a lot of years, and the
> majority of
> these examples are not rough sketches, no matter what the authors
> or Google
> call them. The first example on Jared’s site ( of the space
> station ) is
> more like it. The second example is way to finished IMHO.
>
> Transforming an idea in your head into a sketch with a few well
> placed lines
> and scribbles on the back of a napkin that communicates is an art that
> should be part of every designers toolkit, in whatever medium. Like
> a lot of
> tactile, hands-on ways of working, sketching is becoming a lost art
> for many
> of us. One of the downsides of our dependence on drawing software,
> is we
> (and clients) get too focused on finished-looking products.
>
> Better to spend five minutes to do five quick idea sketches, refine
> one that
> seems to be working and then maybe fire up the drawing or prototyping
> program. Adding to some of the previous “Prototyping Tools”
> threads, rough
> concept sketching and paper prototyping are very freeing and seem
> bring an
> element of play and exploration to the process.
>
> Not everyone’s a visual thinker or can understand a “rough” so
> audience and
> level of understanding is important.
>
> All these tools have there place in the process. See
> www.sketchup.com for an
> interesting “sketchy” program that uses lines that go through the
> endpoints
> as Buxton mentions, but keep your number 2 pencil sharp.
>
> Mark
> --
> Mark Hoffman < markhhoff at earthlink.net>
> Mark Hoffman Associates, Inc.
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org

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