discuss Digest, Vol 42, Issue 15

16 Mar 2007 - 3:05pm
313 reads
Andrew Maben
2007

FWIW, to add one more data point on this behavior and perhaps cast a
glimmer more light - I too perform various mouse actions, that on
reflection I'd classify as reflexive rather than random, most common
of which is selecting/deselecting text by multiple clicks or click-
drag, but also check/uncheck checkboxes, drag images short distances
(Safari), right-clicking, and probably others I don't notice. Is the
behavior more widespread, or merely confined to [forgive
stereotyping] "neurotic creative types"? (I'd guess fairly common,
10%+) Does it matter? (In the case of NYT, I'd say yes - the site
behavior is not present in Safari, so it hasn't bothered me, but I'd
be irritated and distracted to have to make a conscious effort to
suppress a more-or-less unconscious habit in order to read an article).

Just $0.02 on the way out of the office on friday afternoon...

Andrew

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http://www.andrewmaben.com
andrew at andrewmaben.com

"In a well designed user interface, the user should not need
instructions."

On Mar 15, 2007, at 5:18 PM, discuss-
request at lists.interactiondesigners.com wrote:

> From: "Leisa Reichelt" <leisa.reichelt at gmail.com>
> Date: March 15, 2007 4:54:34 PM EDT
> To: "Christopher Fahey" <chris.fahey at behaviordesign.com>
> Cc: IxD Mailinglist <discuss at ixdg.org>
> Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Anticipatory Gestures
>
>
>> For someone like me who does click
>> around the screen in "safe" places as a kind of nervous habit,
>> this is
>> an unwanted functionality. The designers didn't figure on users
>> displaying this kind of "benign interaction" behavior.
>
> I do this all the time too. For me it's a digital version of an
> annoying thing that I do when reading a book, which is to flick
> through the top corner of the pages with my thumb repeatedly. Drives
> people mad, but it's too much of a habit for me to stop.
>
> So, when I'm reading text on a screen, I'm constantly selecting it and
> deselecting it for no reason... just an annoying habit.
>
> I think it's reasonably rare tho'. I've not observed much of this
> either in testing or 'in the wild', and people frequently remark on
> observing me behaving this way that it's strange and unusual.
>
> NY Times apparently does lots of testing. I wonder if they tested this
> new feature and if they saw anything interesting :)

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