ATM interaction design

9 Apr 2007 - 10:51pm
7 years ago
26 replies
3331 reads
Anonymous

ATMs are a pretty common device, and they've been around a long time.
I would have hoped we would have this optimized by now, but it seems
interfaces are still (a) wildly inconsistent and (b) inefficient.

Most ATMs appear to (still) be designed for the first-time user,
which is frustrating for most people.

Here are two good things I've noticed recently:
* PC Financial (Canada): when depositing checks, you are presented
with a small ledger, where you can enter check amounts one at a time,
and let the ATM do the adding. This eliminates addition errors, which
I suspect are more common than potential transcription errors.

* Wells Fargo: you deposit checks and cash directly into the machine
(but only separate). It scans and OCRs the amounts, and adds them up
for. Bonus: no more envelopes, which reduces waste.

And some things that still bothers me:
* Wells Fargo: the machine always prompts me to choose an account,
even though I only have one account.

Example interaction
(1) Main menu appears.
-> Press "account balances"
(2) Select account screen appears.
-> Press Checking
(3) See balance

This occurs for deposits as well. Step (2) can be eliminated for
users (people!) with one account.

* The new deposit process asks me if I want a receipt ... every time.
It doesn't remember my last choice. (The withdrawal process does --
they call this "MyATM preferences).

Paul

shad 96c / uw cs 2001
/ mac activist / fumbler / eda / headliner / navy-souper
fan of / sophie b. / steve poltz / habs / bills / 49ers /

well in case you failed to notice / in case you failed to see /
this is my heart bleeding before you / this is me down on my knees /
--Jewel Kilcher, "Foolish Games"

Comments

10 Apr 2007 - 12:39am
Katie Albers
2005

My biggest complaint with ATMs -- and most other
similar devices such as self-checkouts and the like --
is that the input locations move. For example, the
digits are input on a check screen but the "OK" button
(which they probably referred to as the "Enter"
button) is on a keypad to the right of the screen. And
these aren't instances of designed redundancy either.
The numerals must be entered on the touch screen and
there is no equivalent of the "Enter" button on the
screen.

That isn't the only instance...bizarre combinations of
data input methods are almost a standard in these
interfaces.

How hard is it to choose an input method and location,
for pity's sake.

Katie Albers

--- Paul Schreiber <shrub at mac.com> wrote:

> ATMs are a pretty common device, and they've been
> around a long time.
> I would have hoped we would have this optimized by
> now, but it seems
> interfaces are still (a) wildly inconsistent and (b)
> inefficient.
>
> Most ATMs appear to (still) be designed for the
> first-time user,
> which is frustrating for most people.
>
> Here are two good things I've noticed recently:
> * PC Financial (Canada): when depositing checks, you
> are presented
> with a small ledger, where you can enter check
> amounts one at a time,
> and let the ATM do the adding. This eliminates
> addition errors, which
> I suspect are more common than potential
> transcription errors.
>
> * Wells Fargo: you deposit checks and cash directly
> into the machine
> (but only separate). It scans and OCRs the amounts,
> and adds them up
> for. Bonus: no more envelopes, which reduces waste.
>
> And some things that still bothers me:
> * Wells Fargo: the machine always prompts me to
> choose an account,
> even though I only have one account.
>
> Example interaction
> (1) Main menu appears.
> -> Press "account balances"
> (2) Select account screen appears.
> -> Press Checking
> (3) See balance
>
> This occurs for deposits as well. Step (2) can be
> eliminated for
> users (people!) with one account.
>
> * The new deposit process asks me if I want a
> receipt ... every time.
> It doesn't remember my last choice. (The withdrawal
> process does --
> they call this "MyATM preferences).
>
>
>
> Paul
>
> shad 96c / uw cs 2001
> / mac activist / fumbler / eda / headliner /
> navy-souper
> fan of / sophie b. / steve poltz / habs / bills /
> 49ers /
>
> well in case you failed to notice / in case you
> failed to see /
> this is my heart bleeding before you / this is me
> down on my knees /
> --Jewel Kilcher, "Foolish Games"
>
>
________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association
> (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
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>
>

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10 Apr 2007 - 12:11pm
Tori Breitling
2007

I live in Austin, Texas and the closest--and fee free--ATM to my house
was built on an island in the middle of a parking lot. It wasn't a
drive-through, but required parking your car and walking up to it.

Every time I visited this ATM I felt astounded. The roof design above it
was just enough to shield the machine directly overhead. (This was a
black screen type, not the lcd) What this meant, in Texas, land of 300
plus days of sun a year, was that most of the time you could not read
the screen. That is, not without shielding it with your body, your hand,
a deposit envelope, or whatever you could manage. If it was really
sunny, even creating a full eclipse with your body was not enough.
Several times I used this machine simply from memory.

It's since been remodeled with a greater roof area, but it's a marginal
improvement.

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of
Katie Albers
Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2007 12:39 AM
To: Paul Schreiber; discuss at ixda.org
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] ATM interaction design

My biggest complaint with ATMs -- and most other
similar devices such as self-checkouts and the like --
is that the input locations move. For example, the
digits are input on a check screen but the "OK" button
(which they probably referred to as the "Enter"
button) is on a keypad to the right of the screen. And
these aren't instances of designed redundancy either.
The numerals must be entered on the touch screen and
there is no equivalent of the "Enter" button on the
screen.

That isn't the only instance...bizarre combinations of
data input methods are almost a standard in these
interfaces.

How hard is it to choose an input method and location,
for pity's sake.

Katie Albers

--- Paul Schreiber <shrub at mac.com> wrote:

> ATMs are a pretty common device, and they've been
> around a long time.
> I would have hoped we would have this optimized by
> now, but it seems
> interfaces are still (a) wildly inconsistent and (b)
> inefficient.
>
> Most ATMs appear to (still) be designed for the
> first-time user,
> which is frustrating for most people.
>
> Here are two good things I've noticed recently:
> * PC Financial (Canada): when depositing checks, you
> are presented
> with a small ledger, where you can enter check
> amounts one at a time,
> and let the ATM do the adding. This eliminates
> addition errors, which
> I suspect are more common than potential
> transcription errors.
>
> * Wells Fargo: you deposit checks and cash directly
> into the machine
> (but only separate). It scans and OCRs the amounts,
> and adds them up
> for. Bonus: no more envelopes, which reduces waste.
>
> And some things that still bothers me:
> * Wells Fargo: the machine always prompts me to
> choose an account,
> even though I only have one account.
>
> Example interaction
> (1) Main menu appears.
> -> Press "account balances"
> (2) Select account screen appears.
> -> Press Checking
> (3) See balance
>
> This occurs for deposits as well. Step (2) can be
> eliminated for
> users (people!) with one account.
>
> * The new deposit process asks me if I want a
> receipt ... every time.
> It doesn't remember my last choice. (The withdrawal
> process does --
> they call this "MyATM preferences).
>
>
>
> Paul
>
> shad 96c / uw cs 2001
> / mac activist / fumbler / eda / headliner /
> navy-souper
> fan of / sophie b. / steve poltz / habs / bills /
> 49ers /
>
> well in case you failed to notice / in case you
> failed to see /
> this is my heart bleeding before you / this is me
> down on my knees /
> --Jewel Kilcher, "Foolish Games"
>
>
________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association
> (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............
> http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help ..................
> http://listhelp.ixda.org/
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> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
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> http://resources.ixda.org
>
>

________________________________________________________________________
____________
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11 Apr 2007 - 7:04pm
Helen Killingbeck
2005

Interesting discussion....

Another observation, later confirmed when Iassisting other people at ATM's,
was that some of the ATMs (Toronto locale) really work hard at presenting 2D
bevelled icon button displays on the screen. Except they are not clickable.

I end up first pushing the bevelled appearing button on the screen, only to
have one of those Dohhh! seconds, and then sheepishly follow through by
pushing the metal button on the metal plate surround.

Good way to learn about affordance!

Helen

On 4/10/07, Tori Breitling <tbreitling at homeaway.com> wrote:
>
> I live in Austin, Texas ....
> Every time I visited this ATM I felt astounded. The roof design above it
> was just enough to shield the machine directly overhead. (This was a
> black screen type, not the lcd) What this meant, in Texas, land of 300
> plus days of sun a year, was that most of the time you could not read
> the screen.
> ......

Katie wrote....
..My biggest complaint with ATMs -- and most other
similar devices such as self-checkouts and the like --
is that the input locations move.
That isn't the only instance...bizarre combinations of
data input methods are almost a standard in these
interfaces.
--- Paul Schreiber wrote:

> ATMs are a pretty common device, and they've been
> around a long time.
> I would have hoped we would have this optimized by
> now, but it seems
> interfaces are still (a) wildly inconsistent and (b)
> inefficient.
>

19 Apr 2007 - 10:38pm
cfmdesigns
2004

The ATM I get to (have to) use when at work asks for your PIN, which
you have to enter on the keypad below, but then to confirm it, you
have to press the Yes button next to the screen rather than the Enter
key on the keypad. Annoys the heck out of me every time.

-- Jim

20 Apr 2007 - 7:02am
.pauric
2006

Peeve: Any ATM flow that gives you cash before completing its
interaction with you.

That is, cash before it gives you your card back, or ending secure
access to your accounts.

The primary goal for the majority of people is to get cash, in
distracted or stressfull situations such as wandering kids, late for
appointments, drunk on a night out, baked on the way to your dealer
etc, people have been known to walk away from the machine after
completing their primary goal.

Leaving the machine prompt at 'would you like to complete another
transaction?' leaving the card in the machine. Seems obliviously
stupid but I've seen it happen and done it myself.

80/20 rule, dont stick steps on for the 20 after the 80 have
completed. I would say in this case, make the 20 start again.

20 Apr 2007 - 7:14am
jstrande
2007

Pauric,

Yeah, agreed! I like the machines that are only a card swipe, so the
card is never in the machine. No chance of leaving it behind when it
never leaves your hand.

Also, add Airport to the list of stressful situations / locations. It
is a noisy, unfamiliar environment, your hands are usually full (carry
on bag, coffee, whatever) and your main focus is catching your flight.
I know, some people would say that you shouldn't be "banking" at an
airport ATM, however, sometimes you don't have a choice. :-)

Jon

On 4/20/07, pauric <radiorental at gmail.com> wrote:
> Peeve: Any ATM flow that gives you cash before completing its
> interaction with you.
>
> That is, cash before it gives you your card back, or ending secure
> access to your accounts.
>
> The primary goal for the majority of people is to get cash, in
> distracted or stressfull situations such as wandering kids, late for
> appointments, drunk on a night out, baked on the way to your dealer
> etc, people have been known to walk away from the machine after
> completing their primary goal.
>
> Leaving the machine prompt at 'would you like to complete another
> transaction?' leaving the card in the machine. Seems obliviously
> stupid but I've seen it happen and done it myself.
>
> 80/20 rule, dont stick steps on for the 20 after the 80 have
> completed. I would say in this case, make the 20 start again.
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
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20 Apr 2007 - 7:19am
Tracy Boyington
2007

The ATM in front of my bank doesn't even give you this option... if you
want to complete another transaction, apparently you have to take your
card out, insert it again, and start over. Or maybe you don't, and I
just haven't figured out how to begin another transaction. Either way,
it's poor design IMHO.

Tracy

~~~~~
Tracy Boyington tracy_boyington at okcareertech.org
Oklahoma Department of Career & Technology Education
Stillwater, OK http://www.okcareertech.org/cimc

>>> pauric <radiorental at gmail.com> 04/20/07 7:02 AM >>>

Leaving the machine prompt at 'would you like to complete another
transaction?' leaving the card in the machine. Seems obliviously
stupid but I've seen it happen and done it myself.

20 Apr 2007 - 7:29am
Håkan Reis
2006

I have to admit I did the opposite. In a hurry to the train I took the card
but the money was disposed after some waiting time. And I didn't wait...
Someone was lucky i guess.

The card swipe would probably solve that. After punshing all the buttons I
just had to wait for one thing and thats the money, not card and money.

--
Håkan Reis
Dotway AB

http://blog.reis.se

20 Apr 2007 - 7:31am
.pauric
2006

Jon "I like the machines that are only a card swipe, so the
card is never in the machine. No chance of leaving it behind when it
never leaves your hand."

I've seen swipe machines that require a final step to loop back in to
the start, else print print receipt. We have one in our workspace.
50% of the time I go up to the machine there's an automatically
printed receipt from the previous user. While there's no sensitive
financial information on there, you can see how much someone has left
in their account.

I was an intern at AT&T NCR's research facility about 12 years ago,
back then the primary design focus was on physical security. I guess
the lifespan on these machines deems that we'll see this design
directive for a while.

20 Apr 2007 - 8:05am
Mark Schraad
2006

The BofA near my house recently changed theirs so that it spits the card out right away (once you are verified for the transaction). The workflow is progammable by the branch apparently.

Mark

On Friday, April 20, 2007, at 08:03AM, "pauric" <radiorental at gmail.com> wrote:
>Peeve: Any ATM flow that gives you cash before completing its
>interaction with you.
>
>That is, cash before it gives you your card back, or ending secure
>access to your accounts.
>
>The primary goal for the majority of people is to get cash, in
>distracted or stressfull situations such as wandering kids, late for
>appointments, drunk on a night out, baked on the way to your dealer
>etc, people have been known to walk away from the machine after
>completing their primary goal.
>
>Leaving the machine prompt at 'would you like to complete another
>transaction?' leaving the card in the machine. Seems obliviously
>stupid but I've seen it happen and done it myself.
>
>80/20 rule, dont stick steps on for the 20 after the 80 have
>completed. I would say in this case, make the 20 start again.
>________________________________________________________________
>Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
>List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
>(Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
>Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
>Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
>Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
>Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>
>

20 Apr 2007 - 3:33pm
Michael Micheletti
2006

A couple weeks ago, I fed my card into a BECU machine, entered my PIN, asked
it to give me some money, and then waited for several increasingly anxious
minutes while _nothing_ happened. It had my card, the controls were
unresponsive, there was no phone number to call, and I was getting freaked
out. "What if it doesn't give my card back to me, but it gives it back to
somebody else?" "Can the next guy to visit the machine transfer all my money
to their account?" etc. Total irrational machine-fear paranoia time.

Long minutes later, my card came back to me and the machine posted a
nastygram something like "This machine is not operational, service has been
notified." A bit of an anticlimax given the whole thumpa-thumpa nervous
nail-biting experience that preceded. I was later brave enough to ask a
different machine (successfully) for lunch money.

A responsive user interface and status indication would have been
reassuring. A card swipe would have eliminated the "somebody else ends up
with my card" worry at least.

Michael Micheletti

On 4/20/07, pauric <radiorental at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Jon "I like the machines that are only a card swipe, so the
> card is never in the machine. No chance of leaving it behind when it
> never leaves your hand."
>

21 Apr 2007 - 7:29am
Manish Govind P...
2006

ATMs in India suck in the card if not removed within 5
seconds after the transaction is over and the user has
refused further transactions. It does give out the
beep during the 5 seconds before it pulls it in.

Its a good step in case you do forget to take your
card AND hopefully no one else is behind you in the
line.

Just a simple problem: once the card is in, and the
ATM is not at the bank location, i have to sweat it
out a bit to get my card back. And it could take more
than 24 hrs to get it back.
I guess, a little trade off to keep my money with me,
is acceptable eh?

Manish Pillewar
Sr. User Experience Designer
Bangalore

Clue to another issue: The Decimal Point

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23 Apr 2007 - 12:21am
Anonymous

Manish wrote:

> ATMs in India suck in the card if not removed within 5
> seconds after the transaction is over and the user has
> refused further transactions. It does give out the
> beep during the 5 seconds before it pulls it in.
>
> Its a good step in case you do forget to take your
> card AND hopefully no one else is behind you in the
> line.
>
> Just a simple problem: once the card is in, and the
> ATM is not at the bank location, i have to sweat it
> out a bit to get my card back. And it could take more
> than 24 hrs to get it back.
> I guess, a little trade off to keep my money with me,
> is acceptable eh?

A few months ago, I misplaced my ATM card. It wasn't used by anyone
else, and I'm pretty sure I left it at the ATM, and the machine
sucked it back in.

However, Wells Fargo was unable to tell me:
* if they sucked the card in, and,
* if they destroyed the card

You would think that they would have records of the cards they hang
on to, and in the case where it is one of their own customers, notify
the customer and give them the option of picking up the card from the
branch or having it destroyed, cancelling it and receiving a new one.

It seems implausible that they do not keep records of this, but that
is what the staffers told me.

Remember that ATM interaction design -- that is, my interaction with
the bank -- doesn't stop when I walk away from the ATM.

Paul

shad 96c / uw cs 2001
/ mac activist / fumbler / eda / headliner / navy-souper
fan of / sophie b. / steve poltz / habs / bills / 49ers /

"Luck is the residue of design." -- Branch Rickey

10 May 2007 - 9:17pm
Mitchell Joe
2007

Some things I'd like to change about my local Washington Mutual ATM are:

-When it takes my card, it takes it really slowly. You wouldn't think
that that would make that much of a difference but it does. It's kind
of like if a cashier were to hand you your change back verrrrrry
slowly. Kinda creepy. And it doesn't inspire much confidence in the
abilities of the machine.

-After I enter my 4-digit PIN, I have to press enter or some other
button. Seems like they should just know that when I'm done, I'm
done. It seems like not that much bad could happen by not allowing
the user to cancel the incorrect 4 digits that they've just entered
(as opposed to just telling them right after being the only option).
But maybe some PINs are more than 4 digits. I don't know. (But if
that were the case, then I would vote for making them all the same
length.)

-My ATM makes me indicate that I would like to continue in English. I
live near Chinatown and Little Italy in San Francisco and I do think
they should offer at least Chinese and Italian and Spanish in my
neighborhood, but they shouldn't make English speakers press a button
to continue in English. They should just assume that I want to
continue in English (by saying "Enter your PIN" in the English
language) and at the bottom of that page have the language options.

-Wording. It asks me two questions before it lets me get my cash--
whether I want a receipt and whether I want to see my balance first.
These seem like reasonable things to ask, but my choices for answers
are 'Sure' and 'No, thanks'. What's wrong with 'Yes' and 'No'? I just
want my money. I don't need the machine to try and be friendly. I see
all the metal. I'm not fooled. If my choices were words like 'Yes'
and 'No', then I think that the whole process would go more quickly.
I'd be tempted to not even ask questions and just present the user
with pairs of buttons: 'Receipt' and 'No receipt', and (on the next
screen) 'See Balance' and 'No'.

-It would be great if my ATM could remember what I usually do. I
usually ask for $100 from checking, no receipt, no balance. If I
entered my card and then my PIN and then saw a button that said '$100
from checking - no receipt', that would be great. That would be my
favorite button. And then it could just offer me the other options if
I needed them.

-I agree about the card swipe vs. card swallow issue. I think card
swipe is better, for the reasons mentioned by others. (Makes it
unlikely that you'll leave without your card.)

-I saw this really cool keypad in Germany as I was entering my
friend's apartment building--the keys were clear and plasticky and
numbers on the keypad were generated digitally underneath and the
positions of the numbers changed. This means that the top row wasn't
always 1 2 3 and the second row wasn't always 4 5 6. They might have
been 7 4 3 and 9 1 6. This (I assume) was so that people looking at
you from far away watching where your fingers moved wouldn't be able
to deduce your access code. I'd like one of those on my ATM. :)

Sorry, didn't mean to complain. I love the fact that I can get money
24/7 in about 30 seconds. I'd just prefer if I could get it in about 20.

Mitch

--

"Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of the wise.
Seek what they sought."

Basho

11 May 2007 - 9:31pm
cfmdesigns
2004

When I got my WaMu account, they said the PIN hjad to be 4 digits, no more and no less. So presumably they *could* recognize four and accept.

Wells Fargo allows any length, so my PIN there is 10 digits. Not my SSN, but rather I spell out words; with muscle memory, that's nearly as fast as a 4-digit PIN. (But some systems -- a local Mac store and QFC supermarkets -- can't handle more than 8 digit PINs. Weird.)

As for the German keypad, I would hope that the changing keys would be for context changes. Making it impossible to type in your PIN the same way two times in a row isn't a trade-off for better security that I would like. ATM that aren't convenient aren't something I want to use.

-- Jim Drew / CFM Designs
cfmdesigns at earthlink.net

----- Original message -----
From: Mitchell Joe <mitch at mitchelljoe.com>

Some things I'd like to change about my local Washington Mutual ATM are:

-After I enter my 4-digit PIN, I have to press enter or some other button. Seems like they should just know that when I'm done, I'm done. It seems like not that much bad could happen by not allowing the user to cancel the incorrect 4 digits that they've just entered

-I saw this really cool keypad in Germany as I was entering my friend's apartment building--the keys were clear and plasticky and numbers on the keypad were generated digitally underneath and the positions of the numbers changed. This means that the top row wasn't
always 1 2 3 and the second row wasn't always 4 5 6. They might have been 7 4 3 and 9 1 6. This (I assume) was so that people looking at you from far away watching where your fingers moved wouldn't be able to deduce your access code. I'd like one of those on my ATM. :)

10 May 2007 - 9:54pm
Trip O'Dell
2007

One of my favorite gripes of all time! For as much as ATMs are
utilized, the design is AWFUL (don't even get me started on automated
checkout systems). I agree with almost everything you're saying, but....

> -My ATM makes me indicate that I would like to continue in English. I
> live near Chinatown and Little Italy in San Francisco and I do think
> they should offer at least Chinese and Italian and Spanish in my
> neighborhood, but they shouldn't make English speakers press a button
> to continue in English. They should just assume that I want to
> continue in English (by saying "Enter your PIN" in the English
> language) and at the bottom of that page have the language options.

I disagree, the bank should know your preferred language when you
sign up for an ATM card. (or at least give you the option to note it
either on the application or change it online).

>
> -Wording. It asks me two questions before it lets me get my cash--
> whether I want a receipt and whether I want to see my balance first.
> These seem like reasonable things to ask, but my choices for answers
> are 'Sure' and 'No, thanks'. What's wrong with 'Yes' and 'No'? I just
> want my money. I don't need the machine to try and be friendly. I see
> all the metal. I'm not fooled. If my choices were words like 'Yes'
> and 'No', then I think that the whole process would go more quickly.
> I'd be tempted to not even ask questions and just present the user
> with pairs of buttons: 'Receipt' and 'No receipt', and (on the next
> screen) 'See Balance' and 'No'.

This one is a toss up for me. I bet (no research here, just a hunch)
that the majority of users don't check the balance before
withdrawing, and those that would choose that option first will just
as easily select that option from the first menu (if the bank doesn't
bury it on the second screen). I've seen some machines ask after the
withdraw is submitted if I want to see my balance on the receipt - I
suppose this is a privacy/security measure, but it seems like one
more unnecessary choice to confuse a user.

>
> -It would be great if my ATM could remember what I usually do. I
> usually ask for $100 from checking, no receipt, no balance. If I
> entered my card and then my PIN and then saw a button that said '$100
> from checking - no receipt', that would be great. That would be my
> favorite button. And then it could just offer me the other options if
> I needed them.

Agreed - but I would take it a step further. I would allow users to
configure their own atm options on the bank website. Including the
ability to enforce a personal limit on how much can be withdrawn in a
single transaction, or even where the card can be used (in the case
of a debit card). This would be a tremendous benefit to the customer
in terms of allowing them to control their own security, as well as a
value add for the bank. If my bank allowed me to define my own ATM
setup on their in-system machines, I would be far less likely to go
out of system (fees aside). Banks talk a lot about bricks and
clicks, but most banking sites don't do much more than speed up the
same-old pre-internet/pre cashless consumer transactions. My wife and
I almost never use cash, but I recognize that with the current
system, its only a matter of time before someone gets ahold of my
card, or worse yet, good credit. The security focus has been on
making the technology "smart" to defend people from themselves -
which never works. I think they should focus on giving the user the
tools to defend themselves.

>
> -I saw this really cool keypad in Germany as I was entering my
> friend's apartment building--the keys were clear and plasticky and
> numbers on the keypad were generated digitally underneath and the
> positions of the numbers changed. This means that the top row wasn't
> always 1 2 3 and the second row wasn't always 4 5 6. They might have
> been 7 4 3 and 9 1 6. This (I assume) was so that people looking at
> you from far away watching where your fingers moved wouldn't be able
> to deduce your access code. I'd like one of those on my ATM. :)
>
That's pretty cool, but I don't think that would pass muster under
the ADA (unless the keys also support dynamic braille). I also think
it would cause many users difficulty (myself included). I'm
dyslexic. So I can't always count on "seeing" correctly. I use other
means to remember passwords - pneumonic, chunking, patterns. If I had
to rely on remembering the correct numbers in the correct order
without the use of these contextual cues, I'd be one broke dude.

Trip

10 May 2007 - 10:35pm
cfmdesigns
2004

On May 10, 2007, at 7:54 PM, Trip O'Dell wrote:

>> -My ATM makes me indicate that I would like to continue in English. I
>> live near Chinatown and Little Italy in San Francisco and I do think
>> they should offer at least Chinese and Italian and Spanish in my
>> neighborhood, but they shouldn't make English speakers press a button
>> to continue in English.
>
> I disagree, the bank should know your preferred language when you
> sign up for an ATM card. (or at least give you the option to note it
> either on the application or change it online).

Or just set the preference the first time that the card is used.

>> -It would be great if my ATM could remember what I usually do. I
>> usually ask for $100 from checking, no receipt, no balance. If I
>> entered my card and then my PIN and then saw a button that said '$100
>> from checking - no receipt', that would be great. That would be my
>> favorite button. And then it could just offer me the other options if
>> I needed them.
>
> Agreed - but I would take it a step further. I would allow users to
> configure their own atm options on the bank website.

Eh, whatever. It will cost them $20 million dollars to enable that,
1% of online customers will use it (and only 1% of all customers will
be online ones), and there will be absolutely no increase in ATM
usage or new customers as a result. No ROI.

We already know that only a handful of users will customize the
interface of an app they are already in. Far fewer would customize
the interface for an app they aren't currently using.

An MRU or favorite button would probably be easier to implement and
have a more direct impact on the user.

-- Jim

10 May 2007 - 11:24pm
Jeffrey D. Gimzek
2007

>> -Wording. It asks me two questions before it lets me get my cash--
>> whether I want a receipt and whether I want to see my balance first.
>> These seem like reasonable things to ask, but my choices for answers
>> are 'Sure' and 'No, thanks'. What's wrong with 'Yes' and 'No'? I just
>> want my money. I don't need the machine to try and be friendly. I see
>> all the metal. I'm not fooled. If my choices were words like 'Yes'
>> and 'No', then I think that the whole process would go more quickly.
>> I'd be tempted to not even ask questions and just present the user
>> with pairs of buttons: 'Receipt' and 'No receipt', and (on the next
>> screen) 'See Balance' and 'No'.
>>
>
> This one is a toss up for me. I bet (no research here, just a hunch)
> that the majority of users don't check the balance before
> withdrawing, and those that would choose that option first will just
> as easily select that option from the first menu (if the bank doesn't
> bury it on the second screen). I've seen some machines ask after the
> withdraw is submitted if I want to see my balance on the receipt - I
> suppose this is a privacy/security measure, but it seems like one
> more unnecessary choice to confuse a user.

this is NOT an unnecessary choice or a helpful option, it is a hidden
and dishonest revenue stream.

you may have noticed this "check balance" option has sprung up on
most ATMs recently... if you use your own bank's ATM, it
automatically tells you your balance on your receipt, or even inline
during the process.

if i have a wamu account and i check my balance on a wamu ATM, great.

however, this option is PUSHED on machines now - ie: first question
prominence.

are they trying to be "helpful"? of course not.

if you are using ANOTHER bank's card on the wamu machine, both wamu
and your bank charge you to display that balance.

$2 for the ATM's charge, another $2 for your bank's charge.

$4 x millions of users, and no notification is given that this option
will cost you.

this is a prime example of a false "feature" in a consumer user
interface - it isnt to help you, it's to rip you off.

jd

11 May 2007 - 1:35am
Claude Knaus
2007

On 5/11/07, Mitchell Joe <mitch at mitchelljoe.com> wrote:
> ...
> -I agree about the card swipe vs. card swallow issue. I think card
> swipe is better, for the reasons mentioned by others. (Makes it
> unlikely that you'll leave without your card.)

In Switzerland, maybe 15 years ago, the card used to be returned after
the money. Since many people forgot their cards in the machine, they
switched the order. Now, the card would be returned before the money
was handed out. When I first encountered the new machine, I took the
card, and almost left without the money, thinking the machine was
broken.

-- Claude

11 May 2007 - 7:43am
Mark Schraad
2006

We worked on early stages of a customizable ATM project a while back.
While the user would seem to be an important consideration, the prime
concern amongst banks, by far, is security. Second is throughput. Any
customization (or for that matter additional functionality or
monetization) caused concerns for fraud, the safety of the user and
slowed throughput. People use tellers inside the bank because they
feel safer. People use (particularly drive through) ATM's for speed
and convenience. My guess is that those are the reasons ATM systems
are now customizable, not for a better user experience.

I am not trying to argue against UCD or customizable features, but
banks are notoriously not user friendly. I used to carry a couple of
old bank statements in my notebook back in the early nineties because
they made great examples of how not to design something for the use
or user. Few customers innately think about their transactions in the
format a bank presents them. Basically all the typical bank does is
dump their records on a piece of paper and put it in the mail.

It would seem that this could be a huge point of differentiation for
the discerning bank.

On May 10, 2007, at 10:17 PM, Mitchell Joe wrote:

> -It would be great if my ATM could remember what I usually do. I
> usually ask for $100 from checking, no receipt, no balance. If I
> entered my card and then my PIN and then saw a button that said '$100
> from checking - no receipt', that would be great. That would be my
> favorite button. And then it could just offer me the other options if
> I needed them.

11 May 2007 - 3:32pm
cfmdesigns
2004

>From: Claude Knaus <clyde7 at gmail.com>
>
>In Switzerland, maybe 15 years ago, the card used to be returned after
>the money. Since many people forgot their cards in the machine, they
>switched the order. Now, the card would be returned before the money
>was handed out. When I first encountered the new machine, I took the
>card, and almost left without the money, thinking the machine was broken.

Back to the WaMu ATM: they use flashing LED cues to indicate where the next action is from. If the card is coming out, green lights flash as the slot. If it's the receipt, lights flash there. Seems to do this job fairly well.

-- Jim

12 May 2007 - 1:52am
Eric Reiss
2007

Further to the "swipe vs. swallow" discussion, "swallowing" is a
basic security device. If you enter the wrong PIN three times, most
ATMs will not return the card, which means the owner must contact the
bank to get it back. Granted, this isn't good if you're
absent-minded, but it does make it impossible for thieves to
experiment with different PIN combinations.

On a different note, I was amused by the "Sure" and "No thanks"
response options. As we know, informal doesn't always mean friendly,
although this looks like a poor attempt to make the transaction more
"human." Damned consultants...:)

Cheers,
Eric

- - - - - - -
Eric Reiss
Managing Director
FatDUX Copenhagen
www.fatdux.com

14 May 2007 - 8:03am
Kurt Morris
2007

-----Original Message-----
>> Some things I'd like to change about my local Washington Mutual ATM
are:

Ahhh, ATMs...my prime target for usability and interaction design
gripes. Here are my top two:

1) Some ATMs produce a receipt the same size as a dollar bill, which is
also the same size as a standard check. Makes it easy to put the receipt
in one's wallet or checkbook. There are many, however, that have odd,
non-standard sized receipts, requiring origami skills to fit into the
same wallet or checkbook. I can see no good reason that receipt sizes
are not standardized.

2) Most ATMs I encounter have slightly tilted screens with buttons on
the casing that are meant to be aligned with text or instructions
on-screen. I'm 6 feet tall and find that many times I have to crouch
down to see which button aligns with which text. Touchscreens, of
course, don't pose this problem.

Many of the other interaction problems have been addressed here, but I
thought I'd throw these in for discussion as well.

Kurt Morris

14 May 2007 - 5:33pm
Will Parker
2007

On May 14, 2007, at 6:03 AM, Kurt Morris wrote:
>
> 1) Some ATMs produce a receipt the same size as a dollar bill,
> which is
> also the same size as a standard check. Makes it easy to put the
> receipt
> in one's wallet or checkbook. There are many, however, that have odd,
> non-standard sized receipts, requiring origami skills to fit into the
> same wallet or checkbook. I can see no good reason that receipt sizes
> are not standardized.

I can see several reasons for lack of standardized sizes based on
engineering constraints, such as available space for paper+mechanism,
expected time between consumable refills, etc, but admittedly, few
reasons that derive from usability.

> 2) Most ATMs I encounter have slightly tilted screens with buttons on
> the casing that are meant to be aligned with text or instructions
> on-screen. I'm 6 feet tall and find that many times I have to crouch
> down to see which button aligns with which text. Touchscreens, of
> course, don't pose this problem.

It doesn't require off-axis viewing to get confused by ATM displays
(although I'm sure that it helps). I get the impression that non-
touchscreen ATM GUIs are written to rather vague specs, along the
lines of 'there shall be one column of four menu choices along the
right side, with pointers to the four adjacent buttons'. I've seen
many an ATM interface where there is little or no alignment between
the on-screen choices and the hardware buttons.

- Will

Will Parker
wparker at ChannelingDesign.com

"The only people who value your specialist knowledge are the ones who
already have it." - William Tozier

15 May 2007 - 5:38pm
Austin Mansu
2007

> -It would be great if my ATM could remember what I usually do. I
usually ask for $100 from checking, no

> receipt, no balance. If I entered my card and then my PIN and then saw
a button that said '$100 from

> checking - no receipt', that would be great. That would be my favorite
button. And then it could just

> offer me the other options if I needed them.

> -I saw this really cool keypad in Germany as I was entering my
friend's apartment building--the keys

> were clear and plasticky and numbers on the keypad were generated
digitally underneath and the positions

> of the numbers changed. This means that the top row wasn't always 1 2
3 and the second row wasn't always

> 4 5 6. They might have been 7 4 3 and 9 1 6. This (I assume) was so
that people looking at you from far

> away watching where your fingers moved wouldn't be able to deduce your
access code. I'd like one of

> those on my ATM. :)

Here in Sydney, there are machines that are doing just that. Favourite
transactions can composed by the user and are available across any ATM
of the same financial institution. I personally welcome the idea and
find it useful, though I admit to being in the dark about the security
implications associated with this concept.

What really agitates me about entering in my password is how slow and
deliberate the action needs to be. On many property security systems,
and even my mobile phone, I am able to input my password at lightning
speed but this is not the case with ATMs. While I am standing there and
plotting my code at around the acceptable rate of one character per 1.5
seconds, anyone behind me could be whatching. The chances of someone
determining my code could be reduced if I could be able to type it
faster.

Austin Mansu
Information Architect Executive | OneDigital Pty Limited

______________________________________________________________________

austin.mansu at onedigital.com.au <mailto:austin.mansu at onedigital.com.au>
w. www.onedigital.com.au <http://www.onedigital.com.au/>
Level 5, 349 Bulwara Road, Ultimo NSW 2007 Australia
___________________________________________________________

21 May 2007 - 6:01pm
Stephen Handley
2007

Sorry if this is a little late on this thread, but I'm slow catching
up. Has anyone used the new Wells Fargo ATM ui. Aside from being a
lot easier on the eyes, it provides two recent favorites, including
withdrawal amount and receipt/no receipt. I've found it pretty
useful. They've also added no deposit envelope check recognition,
which is amazing... after the check is inserted, they show you a
picture of the scanned check and ask you to confirm whether it read
the value correctly. I've used it twenty or so times, and its only
misread once. been really impressed with them lately.
Stephen

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