Arrangement of Dialogbuttons

25 Apr 2007 - 5:25am
7 years ago
2 replies
949 reads
sysscore
2007

Hallo,

i have a question about the alignment of dialogbuttons in modal and
non-modal dialogs.

Our software runs under Java, but our customers using mostly windows
applications.

Modal dialogs

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------

In modal dialogs windows used following combinations [ OK ] [ Cancel ] or
[ Ok ] [ Cancel ] [Apply]

Is it not better, if the "Apply" button is arranged between "OK" and
"Cancel"?

Non-modal dialogs

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------

In non-modal dialogs in mostly applications were used following buttons [
Apply ] [ Close ]

But i want to insert an additional "OK" button for faster confirmation. On
which place i should arrange the "OK" button? I can't find solution about
that problem in the big software styleguides of windows and others.

My proposal is [ Apply ] [ OK ] [ Close ] another proposal [ OK ] [
Apply ] [ Close ]

Has anyone experience with that problem?

Thanks in advance

Thomas Witsack

Comments

25 Apr 2007 - 5:39am
Håkan Reis
2006

Depends on the OS the application runs on and how the users switch between
OS / Application.

If the application is used on different OS and the users use it on different
OS, I would use one arrangement.
If the application is used on different OS but users do not use it on
different OS, I would arrange according to the OS.

Normally the native windows arrangement is [ OK ] [ Cancel ] / [ Ok ] [
Cancel ] [Apply]. Go with the majority and keep this style in windows. Even
if it seems more logical in another arrangement the user are defenately used
to the native arrangement.
--
Håkan Reis
Dotway AB

http://blog.reis.se

25 Apr 2007 - 7:25am
Todd Warfel
2003

We always put the default button at the right and right align the
buttons:
[ Close ] [ Okay ]

One reason is that in testing we've continually noticed people
migrate to the bottom right corner. Even though Windows does it the
other way (default at left). So, they target right, then move along
the line to the left - not very efficient and doesn't match up to
their mental model.

The other problem with the model you're proposing is that the target
of the default button is never going to be in a predictable place
(something Tog griped about with the Apple OS X Dock). It will always
depend on the number of buttons there and their size as to where it
will end up. But placing it at the far right, it's in a (more)
predictable area and target every time.

Our form submission patter puts the default button to the right,
followed by other buttons to the left. Buttons are right aligned. The
default button is visually highlighted (stands out) to help the user
select the appropriate action and reduce mental processing needed to
complete the form.

On Apr 25, 2007, at 6:25 AM, sysscore wrote:

> In modal dialogs windows used following combinations [ OK ]
> [ Cancel ] or [ Ok ] [ Cancel ] [Apply]
>
> Is it not better, if the "Apply" button is arranged between "OK"
> and "Cancel"?
>
> Non-modal dialogs
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> ------
>
> In non-modal dialogs in mostly applications were used following
> buttons [ Apply ] [ Close ]
>
> But i want to insert an additional "OK" button for faster
> confirmation. On which place i should arrange the "OK" button? I
> can't find solution about that problem in the big software
> styleguides of windows and others.
>
> My proposal is [ Apply ] [ OK ] [ Close ] another proposal
> [ OK ] [ Apply ] [ Close ]

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
Partner, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

Syndicate content Get the feed