Brainwaves as Input Method

30 Apr 2007 - 9:20am
7 years ago
5 replies
897 reads
Dan Saffer
2003

A convincing twin of Darth Vader stalks the beige cubicles of a
Silicon Valley office, complete with ominous black mask, cape and
light saber. But this is no chintzy Halloween costume. It's a
prototype, years in the making, of a toy that incorporates brain wave-
reading technology.

Behind the mask is a sensor that touches the user's forehead and
reads the brain's electrical signals, then sends them to a wireless
receiver inside the saber, which lights up when the user is
concentrating. The player maintains focus by channeling thoughts on
any fixed mental image, or thinking specifically about keeping the
light sword on. When the mind wanders, the wand goes dark.

Engineers at NeuroSky Inc. have big plans for brain wave-reading toys
and video games. They say the simple Darth Vader game — a relatively
crude biofeedback device cloaked in gimmicky garb — portends the
coming of more sophisticated devices that could revolutionize the way
people play.

Technology from NeuroSky and other startups could make video games
more mentally stimulating and realistic. It could even enable players
to control video game characters or avatars in virtual worlds with
nothing but their thoughts.

<http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070430/ap_on_hi_te/mind_reading_toys>

<http://www.neurosky.com>

Comments

30 Apr 2007 - 12:58pm
Baldo
2005

I don't really know if this "game" really worked reading mind (with a
finger sensor.. ?!?!), but I tested it in 1998. I controlled the sky
player with my mind (I'm the 5° in the ladder).

http://www.clic.it/info051.htm

Was that the future? Or a fake?

On 4/30/07, Dan Saffer <dan a odannyboy.com> wrote:
> A convincing twin of Darth Vader stalks the beige cubicles of a
> Silicon Valley office, complete with ominous black mask, cape and
> light saber. But this is no chintzy Halloween costume. It's a
> prototype, years in the making, of a toy that incorporates brain wave-
> reading technology.

30 Apr 2007 - 2:40pm
Chris Pallé
2007

Here's an interesting thought:
Imagine if this technology did become part a uniform for a job such
as Police work, or firemen or soldiers. We could see how safe it is
for them to perform their duties in certain stressing conditions.

Sorry, this just got me spinning off into a sci-fi novel... What if
we were required to wear these at our normal desk jobs? Imagine the
implications of your employer seeing spikes and valleys in your brain
activity. Would this be considered an invasion of privacy?

Here's another thought: could we "act" a certain emotion to invoke a
particular response? For instance, let's say I was faking an angry
emotion, could I trigger some event through the device? Could some
people "act" better than others to increase the strength of the event
trigger?

What other implications could a device like this have?

chris.pallé, interactive media designer
--------------------------------------------------------
blueflameinteractive*
732.513.3570
chris.palle at blueflameinteractive.com
http://blueflameinteractive.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/chrispalle
*water logic, meet functional form

On Apr 30, 2007, at 10:20 AM, Dan Saffer wrote:

> A convincing twin of Darth Vader stalks the beige cubicles of a
> Silicon Valley office, complete with ominous black mask, cape and
> light saber. But this is no chintzy Halloween costume. It's a
> prototype, years in the making, of a toy that incorporates brain wave-
> reading technology.
>
> Behind the mask is a sensor that touches the user's forehead and
> reads the brain's electrical signals, then sends them to a wireless
> receiver inside the saber, which lights up when the user is
> concentrating. The player maintains focus by channeling thoughts on
> any fixed mental image, or thinking specifically about keeping the
> light sword on. When the mind wanders, the wand goes dark.
>
> Engineers at NeuroSky Inc. have big plans for brain wave-reading toys
> and video games. They say the simple Darth Vader game — a relatively
> crude biofeedback device cloaked in gimmicky garb — portends the
> coming of more sophisticated devices that could revolutionize the way
> people play.
>
> Technology from NeuroSky and other startups could make video games
> more mentally stimulating and realistic. It could even enable players
> to control video game characters or avatars in virtual worlds with
> nothing but their thoughts.
>
>
> <http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070430/ap_on_hi_te/mind_reading_toys>
>
> <http://www.neurosky.com>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
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30 Apr 2007 - 3:06pm
Trip O'Dell
2007

I wonder how often the system would have to relearn commands? Users
frequently change their perception of how a task is done. I tend to
learn and think in metaphor. If I'm a using a system controlled by
waiting for a specific pattern of thought, what happens when I change
the way I think about a particular task? Our brains discover
shortcuts in thinking. EG - rather than making a mouse move by
thinking left right ect, could I train the system to understand what
I mean when i push the cursor "that way", which is a more abstract
operation on several levels.

Also, how would the system account for intent? How is executing an
order different than thinking about executing an order?

On Apr 30, 2007, at 2:40 PM, Chris Pallé wrote:

> Here's an interesting thought:
> Imagine if this technology did become part a uniform for a job such
> as Police work, or firemen or soldiers. We could see how safe it is
> for them to perform their duties in certain stressing conditions.
>
> Sorry, this just got me spinning off into a sci-fi novel... What if
> we were required to wear these at our normal desk jobs? Imagine the
> implications of your employer seeing spikes and valleys in your brain
> activity. Would this be considered an invasion of privacy?
>
> Here's another thought: could we "act" a certain emotion to invoke a
> particular response? For instance, let's say I was faking an angry
> emotion, could I trigger some event through the device? Could some
> people "act" better than others to increase the strength of the event
> trigger?
>
> What other implications could a device like this have?
>
>
> chris.pallé, interactive media designer
> --------------------------------------------------------
> blueflameinteractive*
> 732.513.3570
> chris.palle at blueflameinteractive.com
> http://blueflameinteractive.com
> http://www.linkedin.com/in/chrispalle
> *water logic, meet functional form
>
>
>
>
> On Apr 30, 2007, at 10:20 AM, Dan Saffer wrote:
>
>> A convincing twin of Darth Vader stalks the beige cubicles of a
>> Silicon Valley office, complete with ominous black mask, cape and
>> light saber. But this is no chintzy Halloween costume. It's a
>> prototype, years in the making, of a toy that incorporates brain
>> wave-
>> reading technology.
>>
>> Behind the mask is a sensor that touches the user's forehead and
>> reads the brain's electrical signals, then sends them to a wireless
>> receiver inside the saber, which lights up when the user is
>> concentrating. The player maintains focus by channeling thoughts on
>> any fixed mental image, or thinking specifically about keeping the
>> light sword on. When the mind wanders, the wand goes dark.
>>
>> Engineers at NeuroSky Inc. have big plans for brain wave-reading toys
>> and video games. They say the simple Darth Vader game — a relatively
>> crude biofeedback device cloaked in gimmicky garb — portends the
>> coming of more sophisticated devices that could revolutionize the way
>> people play.
>>
>> Technology from NeuroSky and other startups could make video games
>> more mentally stimulating and realistic. It could even enable players
>> to control video game characters or avatars in virtual worlds with
>> nothing but their thoughts.
>>
>>
>> <http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070430/ap_on_hi_te/mind_reading_toys>
>>
>> <http://www.neurosky.com>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
>> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
>> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
>> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
>> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
>> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
>> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
> This email has been scanned by the MessageLabs Email Security System.
> For more information please visit http://www.messagelabs.com/email
> ______________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org

30 Apr 2007 - 3:30pm
Matt Attaway
2004

There is a biofeedback game on the market called Journey to the Wild
Divine that includes a USB biofeedback response measuring device. It's a
bunch of mini games chained together in a Myst-like game; each mini game
requires you to focus your thoughts in a different way. The mini games are
actually pretty neat, but the Myst-like portion was agonizing. The best
part of the whole thing is they give away a C++ API to the biofeedback
device so you can make your own applications.

Matt

30 Apr 2007 - 8:22pm
Gordon, Richard E.
2006

To me, the really exciting application of this type of technology is in
the field of assistive technology for people with severe motor
disabilities. Check out the work they are doing at the Georgia State
University Brain Lab http://www.cis.gsu.edu/brainlab/

Richard E. Gordon
UI Technical Analyst, SAIC

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