Desktop application, enabling or disabling the OK button o...

7 May 2007 - 5:04pm
7 years ago
1 reply
475 reads
Chaunsee at aol.com
2007

In a message dated 5/7/2007 5:34:06 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, malo at cae.com
writes:

I am debating whether or not I should disabled the OK button on a dialog box
until the fields that need to be filled are "error free". Let's assume I
have two fields on a dialog box: Name and Position. On dialog open, the name is
empty and the position is defaulted to a predetermined value (which is
editable). Let's assume I clearly identified both fields as mandatory. Do I
leave the OK disabled until a name is entered or do I enable it and provide an
error message if it is selected with no name entered? I personaly prefer to
disable the OK button thus preventing an error from happening but I have
"strong opponents" that prefer to be prompted with an error rather than trying to
figure out why the OK is disabled.

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I have several questions:

1. Do you plan to use the disabling approach on other dialog boxes? The
disabling approach could get more complex if you use it on dialogs with more
than two fields and a mix of required and some optional fields.
2. For some situations, an empty field is an error, but there is also the
possibility that in a more general sense, you could have a required field that
is filled in, but still has an error (like an apostrophe which isn't allowed
in some systems).
3. How often will a person has to use this particular dialog? Is this a
once-in-the-course-of-the-product- lifetime entry or something people will be
filling in often?

Chauncey

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Comments

9 May 2007 - 3:05pm
sebmalo
2005

Thanks to all for the replies,
in a nuthshell, it was decided to go with the disabled approach since it
will be utilized for specific dialog boxes, used for entity creation.
Several kind of entities can be created with the software and it will be
used fairly often. A max of 4 fields can be found on a dialog so it
should not become too confusing for the users.
cheers,
seb

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------------
I have several questions:

1. Do you plan to use the disabling approach on other dialog boxes?
The disabling approach could get more complex if you use it on dialogs
with more than two fields and a mix of required and some optional
fields.
2. For some situations, an empty field is an error, but there is also
the possibility that in a more general sense, you could have a required
field that is filled in, but still has an error (like an apostrophe
which isn't allowed in some systems).
3. How often will a person has to use this particular dialog? Is this
a once-in-the-course-of-the-product- lifetime entry or something people
will be filling in often?

Chauncey

________________________________

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