iPhone - its not about the UI

5 Jun 2007 - 3:20am
7 years ago
26 replies
1007 reads
Morten Hjerde
2007

I think we need to realize that iPhone-lust is not about the UI or the
features. Look at the ads. The calamari add message is about fun,
spontaneity, movies, restaurants, leisure time. It is a lifestyle device, a
contraption you use to signal to yourself and your surroundings who you are.
Its about having the newest, most shiny gadget for people that can afford a
$2000 phone.

As one of the most expensive feature phones on the market, it has to match
the basic features of its competitors like camera and email. Not having
basic features is not an option. It also need some serious "wow" to set it
apart. The form factor, the nice graphics and the direct manipulation helps
with this.

Its not intended to be "exclusive" as for example the Prada phone. The Prada
phone is targeted squarely at the fashionistas. The iPhone is designed to
appeal to people who define themselves as successful individuals and these
people don't want to appear vain.

Justifying the price will not be a problem for people. People who have (or
want) an iPod has already bought the first $300. ("Actually, I was thinking
I should upgrade to one of those video iPods anyway. If I just spend another
$300 I get both a new phone and a internet tablet - sounds like a steal!")
It would not surprise me if they sold more $600 iPhones than $500.

The problem is switching carriers. There are all sorts of practical barriers
to this. Giving people 5-6 months prior notice was very wise.

Apple has always been about industrial design. They look good, they make us
look good, so we forgive a lot.

--
Morten Hjerde
http://sender11.typepad.com

Comments

5 Jun 2007 - 3:40am
Stew Dean
2007

On 05/06/07, Morten Hjerde <mhjerde at gmail.com> wrote:
> I think we need to realize that iPhone-lust is not about the UI or the
> features. Look at the ads. The calamari add message is about fun,
> spontaneity, movies, restaurants, leisure time. It is a lifestyle device, a
> contraption you use to signal to yourself and your surroundings who you are.
> Its about having the newest, most shiny gadget for people that can afford a
> $2000 phone.

Technolust is part of the story, but it's technolust driven by the
user experience (not user interface) The fact it's apple and the fact
it's one of the most eagerly waited gizmos is not to be ignored (and
there will be a guaranteed backlash because X doesnt work that well)
but, well, the device is being applauded because of it's user
experience NOT user interface.

Why do I say user experience and not interface? Well if I point to the
Apple TV it has a high level user interface but the user experience is
terrible for many reasons (watching low quality video clips on a big
TV, Internet connection that doesnt allow you to buy video on demand
content. An good interface a user experience does not make!).

--
Stewart Dean

5 Jun 2007 - 3:50am
Prachi Pundeer
2007

There is something called appeal. Apple has been succesful in making this
new gizmo so much appealing already that people are dying to switch over
from their old (no matter how latest) cell phones, and music players. People
who are still in the phase of switching over to iPods are now thinking that
why an iPod when they are getting so many other things with a little more
money, a phone, a web browser, video audio players, and besides such a cool
looking thing in which you wont have to fumble with a stylus anymore, one
can use their fingers alone for the touchscreen. It is all about how well
they have intergrated all these things together. If you compare it to the
other phones in market who have the same features, this one takes the higher
position because of not only an user appeal, and definitely the user
experience as Stew mentioned.
Prachi Pundeer

On 6/5/07, Stew Dean <stewdean at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> On 05/06/07, Morten Hjerde <mhjerde at gmail.com> wrote:
> > I think we need to realize that iPhone-lust is not about the UI or the
> > features. Look at the ads. The calamari add message is about fun,
> > spontaneity, movies, restaurants, leisure time. It is a lifestyle
> device, a
> > contraption you use to signal to yourself and your surroundings who you
> are.
> > Its about having the newest, most shiny gadget for people that can
> afford a
> > $2000 phone.
>
> Technolust is part of the story, but it's technolust driven by the
> user experience (not user interface) The fact it's apple and the fact
> it's one of the most eagerly waited gizmos is not to be ignored (and
> there will be a guaranteed backlash because X doesnt work that well)
> but, well, the device is being applauded because of it's user
> experience NOT user interface.
>
> Why do I say user experience and not interface? Well if I point to the
> Apple TV it has a high level user interface but the user experience is
> terrible for many reasons (watching low quality video clips on a big
> TV, Internet connection that doesnt allow you to buy video on demand
> content. An good interface a user experience does not make!).
>
>
> --
> Stewart Dean
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
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>

5 Jun 2007 - 5:23am
Håkan Reis
2006

I haven't seen any of the ads yet. And unfortunately, living in Sweden, wont
see and try out the gizmo myself for a while.

But I look forward to se how things integrate. Currently, we have these
phones with lots of features but every application work as it's an isolated
entity. The calendar could for example tie into the user profiles, turning
the sound on the ring tone down during planned meetings. If you get an SMS
that states dates you could get the oportunity to add them as events and so
on. If Apple has pulled this off they really have advanced the User
Experience. But if the experience with iPhone is like having a camera, iPod
and phone slapped, you will not gain much in User Experience. Then it will
as all others only sell on the usual feature list.
--
Håkan Reis
Dotway AB
http://blog.reis.se

5 Jun 2007 - 6:42am
.pauric
2006

Good point Håkan, undoubtedly the syncronisation with OS X will be
seemless. iPhoto will automatically launch when it has detected new
photos on the docked phone, similarly with iCal & mail.

But what about PC users? or is this another Halo Effect play for now?

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=16963

5 Jun 2007 - 8:18am
Todd Warfel
2003

It's going to be just as disruptive as the iPod. It's going to change
the phone and mobile computing industry. This thing is more than a
phone. It makes smart phones look like amateurs who've been lucky to
be in the game for so long. My wife thinks this "phone" is too
expensive. I keep telling her it's not just a phone, it's so much more.

But even if it is just a mobile phone to you with an iPod built in,
somebody finally decided to do mobile communication the way it should
be done - completely contextual. That's the beauty of it - the
interface is dependent upon the experience and activity.

Hardcore HCI people might not like that the interface changes between
activities. But from a practical usability standpoint, it's
brilliant. My interface is exactly what it should be based on the
task I'm trying to accomplish.

On Jun 5, 2007, at 7:42 AM, pauric wrote:

> But what about PC users? or is this another Halo Effect play for now?

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

5 Jun 2007 - 8:53am
.pauric
2006

First - apologies for being a negative naysayer. whatever.

Todd, the iPod was a closed ecosystem, again the story - music.
Hardware/Software solution, it sync'd. Ok...

I can see the iPhone environment working relatively well in an Apple
only work/home environment. That said I have no end of problems
switching between my work firewalled SMTP proxy server and my home
connection directly to smtp.mac. IF OS X gets confused, so will the
iPhone. Point being, music is one thing, this is a whole new level
of systems integration.

So, in a probable work PC environment, possible home Mac setup... I
feel setting up and maintaining video, pictures, local copies of
email, sync'ing calenders & address books etc, is going to be
problematic.

Anyone know about the sync'ing side of the solution? seems it might
be a large part of the experience to me.

Again, sorry for asking questions, I'll try and be more upbeat in
future, anyone got a spare prozac?

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=16963

5 Jun 2007 - 9:22am
Mark Schraad
2006

Good question. I can't recall any information about the sync. Is it a bluetooth - or a standard USB connector. If the latter, it more easily opens the door for larger displays and keyboards in a non-mobile situation.

>So, in a probable work PC environment, possible home Mac setup... I
>feel setting up and maintaining video, pictures, local copies of
>email, sync'ing calenders & address books etc, is going to be
>problematic.

5 Jun 2007 - 9:30am
Todd Warfel
2003

Have you tried telling them to fix it? :).

On Jun 5, 2007, at 9:53 AM, pauric wrote:

> So, in a probable work PC environment,

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

5 Jun 2007 - 9:40am
natekendrick
2005

Really? I saw the ads, read thru the new site area... and came away
with the distinct notion that Apple has made a complete 180 turn in
how it advertises its products.

The iPod - experience. The Mac guy vs PC guy - experience. Here Apple
takes it to a place that reinforces stereotypes (not a fan of this
advertising btw) that speak strongly to general experiences people
may have or perceive.

These iconic ads said nothing about the UI, everything about the
experience. Realize that once we start talking about a user
experience of a physical product, its ALL facets. Not just the
limited, in scope, UE method/process that we practice developing
websites.

With the iPhone, yes its about the user experience... but more
importantly for the day to day user it will be all about the UI.

Just think, showing someone coverflow with your figure moving it will
absolutely blow people away. People won't be blown away by finding a
seafood restaurant in downtown SF (I mean, come on... could we find a
more typical, generic, use case?) People will simply say... I can do
that in different ways... its not truly mindblowing like the UI is.

-N

On Jun 5, 2007, at 1:40 AM, Stew Dean wrote:

> the device is being applauded because of it's user
> experience NOT user interface.

5 Jun 2007 - 9:54am
Taneem Talukdar
2005

People won't be blown away by finding a
seafood restaurant in downtown SF (I mean, come on... could we find a
more typical, generic, use case?) People will simply say... I can do
that in different ways... its not truly mindblowing like the UI is.

I completely agree. The whole time I watched these ads, it occurred to me
that I could do more or less everything shown in the videos on a Blackberry.
But the fluidity and responsiveness of the iPhone UI is pretty amazing
(although, having used a PSP, the graphics are not really groundbreaking).

The other interesting thing about the iPhone UI is that Steve Jobs has said
it takes a week to get used to the on-screen keyboard and that you have to
learn to "trust it". A week seems like a long time to get used to a qwerty
keyboard. In other cases (such as the SureType system on some blackberrys),
the learning time is arguably less and yet people don't get the hang of it.
Of course, someone who buys the iphone will probably have the patience to
spend a week learning how to use a keyboard (i liked the quote "they're mac
users, they'll blame themselves", from the interviews that were linked to
yesterday on the list).

5 Jun 2007 - 10:30am
Todd Warfel
2003

Yes, and you can calculate using an abacus as well, but a calculator
makes it much quicker and easier.

On Jun 5, 2007, at 10:54 AM, Taneem Talukdar wrote:

> I completely agree. The whole time I watched these ads, it occurred
> to me
> that I could do more or less everything shown in the videos on a
> Blackberry.
> But the fluidity and responsiveness of the iPhone UI is pretty amazing
> (although, having used a PSP, the graphics are not really
> groundbreaking).

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

5 Jun 2007 - 10:33am
Dan Saffer
2003

Actually, what's interesting about the ads (and unique in mobile
phone devices) is the showing off of the UI as a product
differentiator. Typically, mobile phones are sold based on their
physical form factor (see: RAZR), not the UI. In many stores, there
is even a sticker over the screen, since the phones aren't turned on.
It's an interesting shift worth noting. And good for us, because it
means that the interaction design of mobile phones becomes a selling
point, not just something they need to have ("hygiene" as I've heard
it referred to).

Dan

5 Jun 2007 - 11:07am
natekendrick
2005

Yes, you can spread photos out on the table and share with your
friends visiting as well... but Microsoft's Surface makes it much
quicker and easier.

haha, see how much fun this is?!

On Jun 5, 2007, at 8:30 AM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:

> Yes, and you can calculate using an abacus as well, but a calculator
> makes it much quicker and easier.

5 Jun 2007 - 11:17am
Todd Warfel
2003

Quite true. And the cost difference between a $30 IKEA coffee table
and the $10k pricetag (or whatever it is) of the MS Surface is
proportional to getting a free phone, or $50 phone and the $500
iPhone. Although the "smart" phones are running, what $300? So, the
iPhone isn't that much more...

On Jun 5, 2007, at 12:07 PM, Nathan Kendrick wrote:

> Yes, you can spread photos out on the table and share with your
> friends visiting as well... but Microsoft's Surface makes it much
> quicker and easier.
>
> haha, see how much fun this is?!

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

5 Jun 2007 - 11:28am
natekendrick
2005

I think the witty repartee (or dumb high-school humor) is not
translating well.

I was thinking your comment was made in jest... so I made a similar
comment - to make a point that Surface would, in reality and not in
some weird advertising-reality, make sharing photos MORE complicated
than simply physically spreading them out on the table.

do we think the iPhone makes making calls more complicated? I sure
don't. The conf call ease-of-use alone will avoid many Dilbert calls
and recalls and failed meetings.

On Jun 5, 2007, at 9:17 AM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:

> Quite true. And the cost difference between a $30 IKEA coffee table
> and the $10k pricetag (or whatever it is) of the MS Surface is
> proportional to getting a free phone, or $50 phone and the $500
> iPhone. Although the "smart" phones are running, what $300? So, the
> iPhone isn't that much more...
>
> On Jun 5, 2007, at 12:07 PM, Nathan Kendrick wrote:
>
>> Yes, you can spread photos out on the table and share with your
>> friends visiting as well... but Microsoft's Surface makes it much
>> quicker and easier.
>>
>> haha, see how much fun this is?!

5 Jun 2007 - 11:52am
Todd Warfel
2003

Yeah, lost in translation. I thought that using the Surface would
actually be kind of fun.

On Jun 5, 2007, at 12:28 PM, Nathan Kendrick wrote:

> I think the witty repartee (or dumb high-school humor) is not
> translating well.
>
> I was thinking your comment was made in jest... so I made a similar
> comment - to make a point that Surface would, in reality and not in
> some weird advertising-reality, make sharing photos MORE complicated
> than simply physically spreading them out on the table.
>
> do we think the iPhone makes making calls more complicated? I sure
> don't. The conf call ease-of-use alone will avoid many Dilbert calls
> and recalls and failed meetings.

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

5 Jun 2007 - 12:07pm
Jack L. Moffett
2005

Perhaps it would make it more complicated than shuffling printed
photos around on a coffee table, but it provides more capabilities
(e.g. resizing). In fact, considering that it is presenting digital
photos, rather than prints, I would argue that Nathan's comparison is
flawed. The point isn't that interacting with photos on a Surface is
more or less complicated than interacting with physical prints on a
table. The point is that Surface makes interacting with digital
photos more like interacting with physical photos, and is therefore
less complex than the methods we currently use to interact with them.

Jack

On Jun 5, 2007, at 12:52 PM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:

> Yeah, lost in translation. I thought that using the Surface would
> actually be kind of fun.
>
> On Jun 5, 2007, at 12:28 PM, Nathan Kendrick wrote:
>
>> I was thinking your comment was made in jest... so I made a similar
>> comment - to make a point that Surface would, in reality and not in
>> some weird advertising-reality, make sharing photos MORE complicated
>> than simply physically spreading them out on the table.

Jack L. Moffett
Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

To design is much more than simply
to assemble, to order, or even to edit;
it is to add value and meaning,
to illuminate, to simplify, to clarify,
to modify, to dignify, to dramatize,
to persuade, and perhaps even to amuse.

- Paul Rand

5 Jun 2007 - 12:29pm
natekendrick
2005

The physical aspects would always be more complicated in a virtual
tabletop. Why do people want to make photo larger when viewing it?
So they can see more detail. How would I do this normally? By
bringing the photo closer to my eyes. Simple.

The virtual aspects of Surface are compelling and more useful. Such
as exporting my photos to my friend's device simply by placing it on
the tabletop. Now that's cool and easier than how its done today.

-N

On Jun 5, 2007, at 10:07 AM, Jack Moffett wrote:

> Perhaps it would make it more complicated than shuffling printed
> photos around on a coffee table, but it provides more capabilities
> (e.g. resizing). In fact, considering that it is presenting digital
> photos, rather than prints, I would argue that Nathan's comparison is
> flawed. The point isn't that interacting with photos on a Surface is
> more or less complicated than interacting with physical prints on a
> table. The point is that Surface makes interacting with digital
> photos more like interacting with physical photos, and is therefore
> less complex than the methods we currently use to interact with them.
>
> Jack
>
>
> On Jun 5, 2007, at 12:52 PM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:
>
>> Yeah, lost in translation. I thought that using the Surface would
>> actually be kind of fun.
>>
>> On Jun 5, 2007, at 12:28 PM, Nathan Kendrick wrote:
>>
>>> I was thinking your comment was made in jest... so I made a similar
>>> comment - to make a point that Surface would, in reality and not in
>>> some weird advertising-reality, make sharing photos MORE complicated
>>> than simply physically spreading them out on the table.

5 Jun 2007 - 12:40pm
Michael Micheletti
2006

As I've followed this thread, I've been thinking about the iPhone experience
as a device (shiny, black background, pretty icons, calimari, etc) vs the
iPhone experience when connected to the cell phone carrier (Cingular/AT&T
Wireless?). The Apple people are big on user experience. The cellular
carrier people are, well, not.

Imagine a cellular carrier who was really serious about providing a great
user experience for their subscribers:
- They'd have seamless coverage, even inside buildings and out in the
boonies
- They'd sell unlocked phones
- They'd sell 6 month or 1 year contracts because their service would be so
great they'd be sure you'd resubscribe
- They'd cover any costs of switching to them from another carrier before
your contract was up
- They'd have customer support people who understand accounting, cell
phones, data, and applications so that they wouldn't have to transfer you in
circles when you called for help
- They'd help you understand all the costs up front, including taxes and
fees

So maybe I'm dreaming, and any outfit that went down these paths would go
toes up in no time. But when I look at the iPhone and think of how it's a
glorious beautiful object, I remember about connecting it to any of our
current batch of wireless providers and feel a bit let down. Would that the
iPhone was a total experience including iPhone-class service.

Michael Micheletti

On 6/5/07, Morten Hjerde <mhjerde at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> I think we need to realize that iPhone-lust is not about the UI or the
> features.

5 Jun 2007 - 1:49pm
Matt Attaway
2004

> Anyone know about the sync'ing side of the solution? seems it might
> be a large part of the experience to me.
>
I've always assumed the iPhone would sync the same way an iPod does;
through iTunes connected to the computer via a USB dock. I use my pod with
Windows and it handles photos and contacts fairly well. It automatically
pulls photos from the My Photos directory and pulls contacts from Outlook.
Of course all the music and videos are stored in iTunes. It would be nice
to be able to pull contacts from another app, but otherwise it is a fairly
solid solution.

Matt

5 Jun 2007 - 2:35pm
cfmdesigns
2004

>From: pauric <radiorental at gmail.com>
>
>Good point Håkan, undoubtedly the syncronisation with OS X will be
>seemless. iPhoto will automatically launch when it has detected new
>photos on the docked phone, similarly with iCal & mail.

This is arguably the biggest attraction point to me. A phone is a phone, and I already have, um, 3? iPods and an eSansa, but the allure of a genuine Mac PDA is what drives me. Doubly so since I can expect a whole lot of similarity in the UI behaviors between the iPhone and the desktop.

-- Jim

5 Jun 2007 - 6:01pm
Phil Chung
2007

Cingular was the first wireless provider I ever signed up with, and I immediately jumped ship to a competitor because of poor service. Ironically, I now work for the Human Centered Design group at AT&T Mobility. We're a relatively new group within the organization (4-5 years), but we've grown rapidly and have managed to procure a lot of buy in from the execs. So, yes, the wireless carriers ARE starting to worry about user experience, even the one supporting the iPhone. The fact that they pushed hard to get the deal on the iPhone in itself says something to me. Hopefully, many of those wishes you have listed will also be addressed in time.

Phil Chung

----- Original Message ----
From: Michael Micheletti <michael.micheletti at gmail.com>
To: Morten Hjerde <mhjerde at gmail.com>
Cc: IxDA Discuss <discuss at ixda.org>
Sent: Tuesday, June 5, 2007 1:40:01 PM
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] iPhone - its not about the UI

As I've followed this thread, I've been thinking about the iPhone experience
as a device (shiny, black background, pretty icons, calimari, etc) vs the
iPhone experience when connected to the cell phone carrier (Cingular/AT&T
Wireless?). The Apple people are big on user experience. The cellular
carrier people are, well, not.

Imagine a cellular carrier who was really serious about providing a great
user experience for their subscribers:
- They'd have seamless coverage, even inside buildings and out in the
boonies
- They'd sell unlocked phones
- They'd sell 6 month or 1 year contracts because their service would be so
great they'd be sure you'd resubscribe
- They'd cover any costs of switching to them from another carrier before
your contract was up
- They'd have customer support people who understand accounting, cell
phones, data, and applications so that they wouldn't have to transfer you in
circles when you called for help
- They'd help you understand all the costs up front, including taxes and
fees

So maybe I'm dreaming, and any outfit that went down these paths would go
toes up in no time. But when I look at the iPhone and think of how it's a
glorious beautiful object, I remember about connecting it to any of our
current batch of wireless providers and feel a bit let down. Would that the
iPhone was a total experience including iPhone-class service.

Michael Micheletti

On 6/5/07, Morten Hjerde <mhjerde at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> I think we need to realize that iPhone-lust is not about the UI or the
> features.
________________________________________________________________
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5 Jun 2007 - 6:31pm
Mark Schraad
2006

Apple’s iPhone is all about the user’s experience – anticipating the
needs and multi-tasking wants of the consumer. Meanwhile – the cell
phone industry barely notices such issues and is awash in complaints
regarding reception, customer service, billing practices and other
customer touchpoints.

I am reminded of Lennie Small the Steinbeck character in “Of Mice and
Men”. If you recall Lennie tries so hard to keep his mouse… that his
very effort was the mouse’s demise. The cell phone carriers in the
US, much like long distance before it, work so hard to control, that
there is barely enough attention or energy left to focus on the real
value generator – the real potential barrier to switching – treating
customers well. Back in the day - I often wondered if that very
control hastened the rate of commoditization and along the way
created so much of the ill will and low brand loyalty in that industry.

In business school we are all taught to optimize profit. And
considerable amount of time is spent learning methods to accomplish
just that. The phrase, “like printing money” is often used to
describe a business that is immensely profitable. The digital world,
with duplication and distribution costs at nearly zero – is the
ultimate platform for optimizing monetization – even better than
“printing” money. Of course the downside is that duplication has now
been democratized. Nearly everybody can and will read-write-repeat.
DRM has failed to eliminate shrinkage to this point and global
cultural values regarding intellectual ownership will only increase
“the problem.”

Clearly in the thirty or so years that we have been converting our
products to the digital format we have learned to monetize some of
them, but we have not learned to elegantly optimize them for
sustainability. Maybe we should stop worrying about starving and
herding customers, and figure out how to make more appetizing meals
matched to their needs and wants. Maybe I will get in line at the
Apple store early.

On Jun 5, 2007, at 1:40 PM, Michael Micheletti wrote:

> As I've followed this thread, I've been thinking about the iPhone
> experience
> as a device (shiny, black background, pretty icons, calimari, etc)
> vs the
> iPhone experience when connected to the cell phone carrier
> (Cingular/AT&T
> Wireless?). The Apple people are big on user experience. The cellular
> carrier people are, well, not.
>
> Imagine a cellular carrier who was really serious about providing a
> great
> user experience for their subscribers:
> - They'd have seamless coverage, even inside buildings and out in the
> boonies
> - They'd sell unlocked phones
> - They'd sell 6 month or 1 year contracts because their service
> would be so
> great they'd be sure you'd resubscribe
> - They'd cover any costs of switching to them from another carrier
> before
> your contract was up
> - They'd have customer support people who understand accounting, cell
> phones, data, and applications so that they wouldn't have to
> transfer you in
> circles when you called for help
> - They'd help you understand all the costs up front, including
> taxes and
> fees
>
> So maybe I'm dreaming, and any outfit that went down these paths
> would go
> toes up in no time. But when I look at the iPhone and think of how
> it's a
> glorious beautiful object, I remember about connecting it to any of
> our
> current batch of wireless providers and feel a bit let down. Would
> that the
> iPhone was a total experience including iPhone-class service.
>
> Michael Micheletti
>
> On 6/5/07, Morten Hjerde <mhjerde at gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> I think we need to realize that iPhone-lust is not about the UI or
>> the
>> features.
> ________________________________________________________________
>

5 Jun 2007 - 6:35pm
Michael Micheletti
2006

Thanks Phil, I'm glad to hear the battleship is turning. I think I have held
personal or professional contracts with virtually every wireless provider in
the US at some point over the years. Wish there was lots of praise I could
spread around about what great experiences I had. If your company makes it
easy to be a subscriber, provides a superior experience with the iPhone and
other outstanding handsets, and charges reasonable rates for outstanding
performance, word will get out. All the best to you and your colleagues in
the carriers and every wish for your success at enhancing all aspects of the
user experience,

Michael Micheletti

On 6/5/07, Phil Chung <gradlife79 at yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> ... Hopefully, many of those wishes you have listed will also be
> addressed in time.
>
>

14 Jul 2007 - 12:18am
k-ux
2007

I think it is very much about the UI and it is not a phone. The name
seems a strategy to break out into a new niche; however comparing the
Apple iPhone to "a phone" or a "smart phone" does not really hold
up.

The UI is what makes this multifacted web, communication,
entertainment device accessible and understandable given its complex
feature and function set.

I have only had one for two days and I continue to be pleased,
surprised and inspired by the UI solutions conceived.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=16963

14 Jul 2007 - 12:23am
k-ux
2007

Ease of migrating from one carrier to another keeping the same phone
number took all of 10-12 minutes in iTunes. Outgoing calls and web
connectivity worked instantly. Incoming may take up to 24 hours.
Overall pretty smooth.

The You Tube interface is well done and well suited for the device. I
find it easier to browse YouTube on the iPhone than on the Mac-pc.

There are too many elegant details to list, but I have been
exclaiming aloud at weel thought out details making the experience
intuitive and quite free of speed bumps.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=16963

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