example of design standards guide?

25 Jun 2007 - 3:43pm
7 years ago
7 replies
1101 reads
tdellaringa
2006

Does anyone have an example of a design standards guide they could share or
point to? Even a template would be fine.

Many thanks,

Tom

Comments

25 Jun 2007 - 3:47pm
Jonathan Arnowitz
2005

Hi Tom,

Just for clarity, do oyu mean a template for creating/specifying standards,
or do you mean some examples of standards, like the Windows or Apple UI
Standards?
Regards
--Jonathan

On 6/25/07, Tom Dell'Aringa <pixelmech at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Does anyone have an example of a design standards guide they could share
> or
> point to? Even a template would be fine.
>
> Many thanks,
>
> Tom
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
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>

--
---
Jonathan Arnowitz
Co-Author, Effective Prototyping for Software Makers
Now Available from Morgan Kaufman www.mkp.com/prototyping

j.s.arnowitz at acm.org

25 Jun 2007 - 3:52pm
tdellaringa
2006

on 6/25/07, Jonathan Arnowitz <arnoland at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Just for clarity, do oyu mean a template for creating/specifying
> standards, or do you mean some examples of standards, like the Windows or
> Apple UI Standards?

For creating and specifying standards for a system or site. I'm not sure
where I even found the explanation, but here it is below if this will help
clarify (I changed a word or two):

"Many companies provide a "Style Guide." This is often a few branding
standards (the logo goes there) combined with a number of general design
guidelines. The document is saved to a hard drive and promptly never seen or
read by anyone.

A standards guide is successful if the end user moves from one page to
another and has the experience that "Yes! I have seen a page like this
before. And it works the way I expect." To have this happen we must identify
the 10–20 types (roughly, could be more or less) of pages that account for
85% of the pages that will be designed. We then create standard page
templates for each of these. It is like having good DNA in the system/site,
which brings unity and sense to the end result.

The guide is used in the building of actual HTML/CSS templates and in making
sure that scope or feature creep does not muddle the clear design of the
system/site."

The wording could maybe use a little help too - and maybe this is called
something else than a DSG...

Tom

26 Jun 2007 - 4:37am
jstrande
2007

Tom,

Not sure if this is what you had in mind, however, a couple of thoughts:

1.) Sun Microsystems has a Web Design site that contains all sorts of stuff,
from Code & Specs to Assets like Banners and Graphics:
- http://www.sun.com/webdesign/

2.) We use a product called GUIGuide from Classic Systems.
- http://classicsys.com/css06/cfm/guiguide.cfm

Let me know if you'd like to discuss how we use GUIGuide.

Enjoy!

Jon

On 6/25/07, Tom Dell'Aringa <pixelmech at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> on 6/25/07, Jonathan Arnowitz <arnoland at gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > Just for clarity, do oyu mean a template for creating/specifying
> > standards, or do you mean some examples of standards, like the Windows
> or
> > Apple UI Standards?
>
>
> For creating and specifying standards for a system or site. I'm not sure
> where I even found the explanation, but here it is below if this will help
> clarify (I changed a word or two):
>
> "Many companies provide a "Style Guide." This is often a few branding
> standards (the logo goes there) combined with a number of general design
> guidelines. The document is saved to a hard drive and promptly never seen
> or
> read by anyone.
>
> A standards guide is successful if the end user moves from one page to
> another and has the experience that "Yes! I have seen a page like this
> before. And it works the way I expect." To have this happen we must
> identify
> the 10–20 types (roughly, could be more or less) of pages that account for
> 85% of the pages that will be designed. We then create standard page
> templates for each of these. It is like having good DNA in the
> system/site,
> which brings unity and sense to the end result.
>
> The guide is used in the building of actual HTML/CSS templates and in
> making
> sure that scope or feature creep does not muddle the clear design of the
> system/site."
>
> The wording could maybe use a little help too - and maybe this is called
> something else than a DSG...
>
> Tom
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>

26 Jun 2007 - 8:23am
tdellaringa
2006

On 6/26/07, Jon Strande <jstrande at gmail.com> wrote:

>
> Not sure if this is what you had in mind, however, a couple of thoughts:<http://www.sun.com/webdesign/>
>
> 2.) We use a product called GUIGuide from Classic Systems.
> - http://classicsys.com/css06/cfm/guiguide.cfm
>
> Let me know if you'd like to discuss how we use GUIGuide.

Jon, the GUIGuide is exactly the thing I am talking about. It's more than
just what color to use where (although that would be part of it), and so
forth. Would be great if you could elaborate on how you use it, and how or
if you development team sees it as an asset. Basically it looks to me like
software organized around the idea of a design standards guide to make it
easy to access for everyone.

Tom

26 Jun 2007 - 9:05am
Jonathan Arnowitz
2005

I have been using a hierarchy of User Experience Guidelines. We have
corporate standards, the branding and some trademark interactions, then we
have a a company User Experience Standards which cover the platform
standards. Then we have application or solution standards, which are how a
given application applies the Corporate Standards and the UX Standards. Then
we have indiivdual UI specs whicha re the implementation of those specs.

We try to use a single tool for this, the one we chose is Sevensteps (
www.sevensteps.com) they are coming out with a generic version of their UI
Guidelines Editor to, this will probably be available by Q3 of this year.
The advantage of this tool is its ability to use a single source to support
mutiple publications in many mediums (pdf, web, etc.)

---Jonathan

On 6/26/07, Tom Dell'Aringa <pixelmech at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> On 6/26/07, Jon Strande <jstrande at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >
> > Not sure if this is what you had in mind, however, a couple of thoughts:<http://www.sun.com/webdesign/>
> >
> > 2.) We use a product called GUIGuide from Classic Systems.
> > - http://classicsys.com/css06/cfm/guiguide.cfm
> >
> > Let me know if you'd like to discuss how we use GUIGuide.
>
>
> Jon, the GUIGuide is exactly the thing I am talking about. It's more than
> just what color to use where (although that would be part of it), and so
> forth. Would be great if you could elaborate on how you use it, and how or
> if you development team sees it as an asset. Basically it looks to me like
> software organized around the idea of a design standards guide to make it
> easy to access for everyone.
>
> Tom
>

--
---
Jonathan Arnowitz
Co-Author, Effective Prototyping for Software Makers
Now Available from Morgan Kaufman www.mkp.com/prototyping

j.s.arnowitz at acm.org

26 Jun 2007 - 9:33am
jstrande
2007

Tom,

Sure thing - it is accessible to everyone on the team (25 people), however,
my team (4 people) own all the user interface and everything comes from our
group, so we aren't using it as much as we anticipated. Basically it has
become a standards repository where we document our decisions (guidelines &
standards). GUIGuide is much more than a simple standard repository though,
you can create Solutions that tie together several guidelines into a
comprehensive way to communicate an entire interaction, search & result for
example. You can also create Design Checklists, to ensure that all the
appropriate design guidelines for a solution have been followed.

I actually have a place holder in our design methodology for when we get
Solutions written and stored in GUIGuide (never enough time in the day) - so
a developer would be able to just go right to GUIGuide and grab the entire
solution and verify with my team using the aforementioned checklist.

You can also create a resource library and store sample code snippets and
stuff.

Overall it is worth it for us.

Sort of a rambling reply... hope that is the level of detail you were
looking for! Let me know.

Jon

On 6/26/07, Tom Dell'Aringa <pixelmech at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> On 6/26/07, Jon Strande <jstrande at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >
> > Not sure if this is what you had in mind, however, a couple of thoughts:<http://www.sun.com/webdesign/>
> >
> > 2.) We use a product called GUIGuide from Classic Systems.
> > - http://classicsys.com/css06/cfm/guiguide.cfm
> >
> > Let me know if you'd like to discuss how we use GUIGuide.
>
>
> Jon, the GUIGuide is exactly the thing I am talking about. It's more than
> just what color to use where (although that would be part of it), and so
> forth. Would be great if you could elaborate on how you use it, and how or
> if you development team sees it as an asset. Basically it looks to me like
> software organized around the idea of a design standards guide to make it
> easy to access for everyone.
>
> Tom
>

26 Jun 2007 - 10:05am
tdellaringa
2006

On 6/26/07, Jon Strande <jstrande at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Sure thing - it is accessible to everyone on the team (25 people),
> however, my team (4 people) own all the user interface and everything comes
> from our group, so we aren't using it as much as we anticipated. [snip]
>
> Overall it is worth it for us.
>
> Sort of a rambling reply... hope that is the level of detail you were
> looking for! Let me know.

That helps. The cost is fairly high though. I wonder if you couldn't do
something similar with a project wiki or even a small internal HTML site. I
guess it depends upon the scope of the project and how many people you need
to reach. But I don't think we can spring that much cash for that. But this
is the sort of thing I am talking about that I think is helpful, so the
developers don't get lost in wondering how to implement a feature or item on
a page, and make up their own stuff or waste time trying to figure it out.
It keeps the unity in the system we look for.

Tom

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