A quick question to iPhone users

22 Jul 2007 - 11:27pm
7 years ago
14 replies
708 reads
Christina Li
2004

I read a piece on a Chinese website saying that iPhone doesn't support
searching contacts in its phone book. Could any of you who have used it tell
me if it's true?

Being a sort of i..Fan who's working in England and China, I haven't been
lucky enough to touch iPhone, - it's not on the European market yet and is
the most expensive MP3 player in Chinese market.

Cheers

Christina

--
Christina Li
Founder, uiGarden.net (http://www.uigarden.net)
Weaving Usability and Cultures

+44 (0) 7845269566

Comments

23 Jul 2007 - 2:42am
Josh
2006

Christina,

"They" are 50% correct.

The iPhone does not let you search through contacts when choosing someone
call by entering in information about them (name, phone number, etc). You
must select a contact by scrolling through the list of contacts. There is an
alphabetical "jump" menu along the right side to skip to a specific letter
of the alphabet. You can also create a list of Favorite Contacts or import
Contact Groups from Addressbook (not sure how this works on a PC with
Outlook). To help keep contacts organized.

It does support searching through contacts when choosing a recipient of a
SMS or Email.

--
Josh Viney
EastMedia Group
Company http://www.eastmedia.com
Blog http://www.kungpowthinking.com

23 Jul 2007 - 7:28am
Dave Malouf
2005

Josh, good answer, but I think people who have no access to an iphone
need a different context.

Christine, I'm assuming you've seen an iPod well b/c you said you
were an i.Fan, so I'll work from there.

As you've noticed on your iPod there is no search at all. You only
browse, but the reason this works (arguably) is b/c of the type of
physical interface you have in order to do that browsing. You have an
infinite wheel that jumps letters of the alphabet if you go fast for
awhile and it is easy moving back and forth to hone in on your item.

This is how the iPhone works but much better b/c instead of an
infinite scroll like you have w/ a wheel, you have a gravitational
scroll through flicking your finger against the screen. Combination
of speed and pressure return different results of speed, length of
time of speed and rate of deceleration.

AND as Josh mentioned you have the alpha jump list.
Further, common entries that you've already called are listed in a
fairly easy to use "Recent" list (mixes incoming, outgoing and
missed).

Further instead of speed dial you get a "favorites" list. Since the
dial-pad is something you request just like the contact list or recent
or anything else for that matter and is not the default screen (and
there is no dialpad) there is no concept of "speed" dial--just
favorite contacts.

I have several hundred contacts (remember this isn't a corporate
phone so you won't get thousands like you would on a blackberry
hitting the corp address book) and I have never felt lacking for a
"search" feature.

-- dave

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=18556

23 Jul 2007 - 11:16am
Christina Li
2004

I see. Thanks.

So alpha jump list works very well with English names, hmmm...not sure how
it will work with Chinese names. I guess I probably also need to investigate
how other mobile phone support searching within a phone book full of Chinese
names. I haven't used Chinese language on my mobile phone for years.

Another question, when you are browsing the Internet on iPhone by your
fingers, would it be possible for you to accidentally 'click' a link on the
web page?

On 23/07/07, David malouf <dave at ixda.org> wrote:
>
> Josh, good answer, but I think people who have no access to an iphone
> need a different context.
>
> Christine, I'm assuming you've seen an iPod well b/c you said you
> were an i.Fan, so I'll work from there.
>
> As you've noticed on your iPod there is no search at all. You only
> browse, but the reason this works (arguably) is b/c of the type of
> physical interface you have in order to do that browsing. You have an
> infinite wheel that jumps letters of the alphabet if you go fast for
> awhile and it is easy moving back and forth to hone in on your item.
>
> This is how the iPhone works but much better b/c instead of an
> infinite scroll like you have w/ a wheel, you have a gravitational
> scroll through flicking your finger against the screen. Combination
> of speed and pressure return different results of speed, length of
> time of speed and rate of deceleration.
>
> AND as Josh mentioned you have the alpha jump list.
> Further, common entries that you've already called are listed in a
> fairly easy to use "Recent" list (mixes incoming, outgoing and
> missed).
>
> Further instead of speed dial you get a "favorites" list. Since the
> dial-pad is something you request just like the contact list or recent
> or anything else for that matter and is not the default screen (and
> there is no dialpad) there is no concept of "speed" dial--just
> favorite contacts.
>
> I have several hundred contacts (remember this isn't a corporate
> phone so you won't get thousands like you would on a blackberry
> hitting the corp address book) and I have never felt lacking for a
> "search" feature.
>
> -- dave
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=18556
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>

--
Christina Li
Founder, uiGarden.net (http://www.uigarden.net)
Weaving Usability and Cultures

+44 (0) 7845269566

23 Jul 2007 - 11:22am
Dave Malouf
2005

On 7/23/07, Christina Li <uigarden at gmail.com> wrote:
> Another question, when you are browsing the Internet on iPhone by your
> fingers, would it be possible for you to accidentally 'click' a link on the
> web page?

Yup, it is easy to do, but the "stop" key and "back" keys work real
well and while it is annoying, it is not something that degrades
compared to the other functions you get w/ the browser.

I have never enjoyed using regular web pages on a mobile phone before
and I can use sites completely non-optimized for mobile really well
(except for the K-size when on EDGE, but on WiFi there are no issues).

Every phone has gives and takes, and if I'm evaluating the iPhone as a
buyer (and not a designer) there are personal sacrifices in almost
every phone I have ever bought, This one has them too but it makes up
for it with tremendous pleasure.

-- dave

--
David Malouf
http://synapticburn.com/
http://ixda.org/
http://motorola.com/

23 Jul 2007 - 12:38pm
Matt Rehkopf
2007

For those interested, I have started a Google Group to discuss designing for the iPhone.

http://groups.google.com/group/iphoneusability

23 Jul 2007 - 3:37pm
Josh
2006

> On 7/23/07, Christina Li <uigarden at gmail.com> wrote:
> > Another question, when you are browsing the Internet on iPhone by your
> > fingers, would it be possible for you to accidentally 'click' a link on
> the
> > web page?

Yes! And it is relatively frustrating (albeit, still 100X better mobile web
browsing experience than any other I've tried). For example: browsing to
craigslist.org and attempting to select New York from the major cities list
is practically impossible.

Interestingly, I see the problem as a problem with the pages being browsed,
not the design of the device browsing them. Using the iPhone browser has
definitely made me more conscious of the relevancy of Fitt's Law.

- Oh and that brings up a question for the list:

Is there some kinda of "law" or "theory" or something formal sounding for
the idea that every interaction point in a view (web page an example of a
view) is competing for interaction with every other interaction point in a
view?

Because it can be damn difficult to sign out of some sites on the iPhone
when their designers put the sign out link too damn close to the Contact Us
link.

- Josh

--
Josh Viney
EastMedia Group
Company http://www.eastmedia.com
Blog http://www.kungpowthinking.com

23 Jul 2007 - 4:02pm
Raminder Oberoi
2007

A few good features that can help prevent accidental clicks:

A) There is a hover state for the links so you can be sure of the link
being clicked

B) Unless you touch a link and quickly raise your finger off the link
dosent get clicked. You can drag your finger off the link if you
realize thats not the link you want to click.

•Sini

On Jul 23, 2007, at 12:16 PM, "Christina Li" <uigarden at gmail.com> wrote:

> I see. Thanks.
>
> So alpha jump list works very well with English names, hmmm...not
> sure how
> it will work with Chinese names. I guess I probably also need to
> investigate
> how other mobile phone support searching within a phone book full of
> Chinese
> names. I haven't used Chinese language on my mobile phone for years.
>
> Another question, when you are browsing the Internet on iPhone by your
> fingers, would it be possible for you to accidentally 'click' a link
> on the
> web page?
>
>
> On 23/07/07, David malouf <dave at ixda.org> wrote:
>>
>> Josh, good answer, but I think people who have no access to an iphone
>> need a different context.
>>
>> Christine, I'm assuming you've seen an iPod well b/c you said you
>> were an i.Fan, so I'll work from there.
>>
>> As you've noticed on your iPod there is no search at all. You only
>> browse, but the reason this works (arguably) is b/c of the type of
>> physical interface you have in order to do that browsing. You have an
>> infinite wheel that jumps letters of the alphabet if you go fast for
>> awhile and it is easy moving back and forth to hone in on your item.
>>
>> This is how the iPhone works but much better b/c instead of an
>> infinite scroll like you have w/ a wheel, you have a gravitational
>> scroll through flicking your finger against the screen. Combination
>> of speed and pressure return different results of speed, length of
>> time of speed and rate of deceleration.
>>
>> AND as Josh mentioned you have the alpha jump list.
>> Further, common entries that you've already called are listed in a
>> fairly easy to use "Recent" list (mixes incoming, outgoing and
>> missed).
>>
>> Further instead of speed dial you get a "favorites" list. Since the
>> dial-pad is something you request just like the contact list or
>> recent
>> or anything else for that matter and is not the default screen (and
>> there is no dialpad) there is no concept of "speed" dial--just
>> favorite contacts.
>>
>> I have several hundred contacts (remember this isn't a corporate
>> phone so you won't get thousands like you would on a blackberry
>> hitting the corp address book) and I have never felt lacking for a
>> "search" feature.
>>
>> -- dave
>>
>>
>> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
>> Posted from the new ixda.org
>> http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=18556
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
>> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Christina Li
> Founder, uiGarden.net (http://www.uigarden.net)
> Weaving Usability and Cultures
>
> +44 (0) 7845269566
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org

24 Jul 2007 - 12:11am
cherylkimble
2005

but i think the issue is the sites being served are those designed
for large screens. when i try to select something, i can't see what
i'm selecting (or hovering) and i have the same problem trying to
zoom, always hitting some link...

i'm wondering if there's a way to serve up sites and deliver them in
pieces by eliminating some of the existing content, or at least
rearranging it's order. it might be tedious, but at least it wouldn't
be frustrating and tedious....

maybe using xml and sniffing for type of connection/device or resolution?

anyone have any thoughts?

cheryl

>
>B) Unless you touch a link and quickly raise your finger off the link
>dosent get clicked. You can drag your finger off the link if you
>realize thats not the link you want to click.
>
>*Sini

24 Jul 2007 - 2:06pm
Will Parker
2007

On Jul 23, 2007, at 10:11 PM, cheryl kimble wrote:

> but i think the issue is the sites being served are those designed
> for large screens. when i try to select something, i can't see what
> i'm selecting (or hovering) and i have the same problem trying to
> zoom, always hitting some link...
>
> i'm wondering if there's a way to serve up sites and deliver them in
> pieces by eliminating some of the existing content, or at least
> rearranging it's order. it might be tedious, but at least it wouldn't
> be frustrating and tedious....

> maybe using xml and sniffing for type of connection/device or
> resolution?

The traditional way to do that is to use a combination of a device-
specific CSS stylesheet ( LINK REL="stylesheet" TYPE="text/css"
MEDIA="handheld" HREF="foo.css" ) and browser sniffing of the user-
agent string to further tailor the site appearance to the specific
device in use.

> anyone have any thoughts?

It occurs to me that site designers who want their work to shine on
an iPhone could easily (as in 'a weekend of tinkering') offer
hyperlink popups mimicking the style of the iPhone's keyboard popups.
In combination with the browser's 'finger-up == click' behavior, that
should offer sufficient relief for closely-spaced hyperlinks.

The question then becomes how one efficiently conveys the content of
the hyperlink's target without recreating those annoying full-page
thumbnail popups. I'm sure the answer to that question would have to
be content-specific.

- Will

Will Parker
wparker at ChannelingDesign.com

“I wish developing great products was as easy as writing a check. If
that were the case, then Microsoft would have great products.” -
Steve Jobs

24 Jul 2007 - 3:05pm
Fred Beecher
2006

On 7/24/07, Will Parker <wparker at channelingdesign.com> wrote:
>
> On Jul 23, 2007, at 10:11 PM, cheryl kimble wrote:
>
> > i'm wondering if there's a way to serve up sites and deliver them in
> > pieces by eliminating some of the existing content, or at least
> > rearranging it's order. it might be tedious, but at least it wouldn't
> > be frustrating and tedious....
>
> > maybe using xml and sniffing for type of connection/device or
> > resolution?
>
> The traditional way to do that is to use a combination of a device-
> specific CSS stylesheet ( LINK REL="stylesheet" TYPE="text/css"
> MEDIA="handheld" HREF="foo.css" ) and browser sniffing of the user-
> agent string to further tailor the site appearance to the specific
> device in use.

The iPhone UI guidelines (you have been nerd enough to read them, right? : )
state that the iPhone/Safari clearly indicate what they are, so combined
with a simple browser/platform sniffer you could easily serve up a custom
CSS designed solely for display on the iPhone.

Of course, it may be crazy talk to start writing style sheets for individual
devices... but the iPhone is so unique that it may warrant it.

- Fred

24 Jul 2007 - 4:08pm
Josh
2006

Creating device specific stylesheets is a slippery slope, but I tend to
agree that it might not be too bad of an idea for the iPhone. Especially
considering the number of devices sold, and that this version of the iPhone
probably won't be the only device to use Safari. I am fairly certain there
are quite a few businesses that wouldn't mind the tapping the potential of a
few hundred thousand (potentially a few million) dedicated users. I'm pretty
sure a few product managers could find time and budget enough to have their
team spend a weekend or two on it.

Not to mention, there's potential to make an iPhone specific stylesheet work
on other mobile browsers to give those users a taste of what they're
missing.

--
Josh Viney
EastMedia Group
Company http://www.eastmedia.com
Blog http://www.kungpowthinking.com

24 Jul 2007 - 7:08pm
Dave Malouf
2005

on the "device specific" stylesheet front, wouldn't iPhone apps
work w/ S60 (Nokia) devices? At least at some level? Anyone test this
out?
-- dave

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=18556

24 Jul 2007 - 8:05pm
bminihan
2007

> Of course, it may be crazy talk to start writing style sheets for
individual
> devices... but the iPhone is so unique that it may warrant it.

Why not? Thousands of sites are written exclusively for my Wintel device
(laptop) every day =] Just kidding, but only a little...might be nice to
see more awareness of different devices (and not just Windows vs Mac/OSX) in
web sites...

- Bryan
http://www.bryanminihan.com

24 Jul 2007 - 8:55pm
Jennifer Berk
2007

On 7/24/07, Fred Beecher <fbeecher at gmail.com> wrote:
> The iPhone UI guidelines (you have been nerd enough to read them, right? : )
> state that the iPhone/Safari clearly indicate what they are, so combined
> with a simple browser/platform sniffer you could easily serve up a custom
> CSS designed solely for display on the iPhone.

And if you don't want to write a whole stylesheet, it's at least worth
adding one meta tag:
http://furbo.org/2007/07/24/one-line-of-code/
More details are in Apple's guidelines
(http://developer.apple.com/iphone/designingcontent.html) under
Optimize for Page Readability.

Jennifer Berk
Information Architect
Purple Monkey Studios, Inc.

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