Who would you hire?

26 Aug 2007 - 7:58pm
6 years ago
20 replies
347 reads
DanP
2006

Hi Folks,

If you were presented with two candidates for an Interaction Design
position (heavy on UI design and graphics), which type of candidate
would you lean towards: one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
Masters in Fine Art, or one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
Master's in Human Factors?

Assume that each candidate has similar ixdn work experience, and a
portfolio to match. The real difference here is the graduate work.

I know this question has a million variables, but generally speaking,
I'm curious to know if there's a bias one way or the other.

Why would you prefer one degree over the other?

Thanks for any assistance,
-Dan

Comments

26 Aug 2007 - 8:56pm
Wendy Fischer
2004

Not knowing what exact job description you are hiring for, or what type of company you work for, if both candidates are equal in qualification, then I'd suggest hiring the candidate that has the best personality and best experience that works with your team, the company and the project.

As for the graduate degree, If the job involves some visual design, then I'd consider the candidate with the MFA if they showed a reasonable visual design portfolio in addition to the ID portfolio. If the job involves more usability testing, I'd consider the human factors person if they showed experience in testing I don't think I'd prefer one degree over the other, unless the person showed course work related to interaction design in their graduate degree program. Theoretically a person could go through an MFA program or an MS in Human Factors without taking a single course related to interaction design. You would not know unless you requested a transcript and took a long look at their coursework.

Personally, I think the portfolio counts for a lot and personality is very important in choosing the right person. If a candidate's portfolio is not up to par, they won't make it past the front door. If they don't have the right personality to work with the team, then they won't stay in the job very long.

-Wendy
dnp607 <dnp607 at pacbell.net> wrote:

Hi Folks,

If you were presented with two candidates for an Interaction Design
position (heavy on UI design and graphics), which type of candidate
would you lean towards: one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
Masters in Fine Art, or one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
Master's in Human Factors?

Assume that each candidate has similar ixdn work experience, and a
portfolio to match. The real difference here is the graduate work.

I know this question has a million variables, but generally speaking,
I'm curious to know if there's a bias one way or the other.

Why would you prefer one degree over the other?

Thanks for any assistance,
-Dan

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
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26 Aug 2007 - 9:15pm
Mark Schraad
2006

As dangerous hypotheticals go... this one is right up there. I can't
imagine a hiring scenario where the nature of the graduate degree
would be the deciding factor. But I put believe it is more difficult
and more powerful to grow the culture of a team as opposed to
building with pedigree.

All that being said, would not any respectable ID program be chalked
full of HF theory? Would not the IxD position ask for breadth and
nontraditional thinking? Is my bias at all veiled here?

Mark

On Aug 26, 2007, at 8:58 PM, dnp607 wrote:

>
> Hi Folks,
>
> If you were presented with two candidates for an Interaction Design
> position (heavy on UI design and graphics), which type of candidate
> would you lean towards: one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
> Masters in Fine Art, or one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
> Master's in Human Factors?
>
> Assume that each candidate has similar ixdn work experience, and a
> portfolio to match. The real difference here is the graduate work.
>
> I know this question has a million variables, but generally speaking,
> I'm curious to know if there's a bias one way or the other.
>
> Why would you prefer one degree over the other?
>
> Thanks for any assistance,
> -Dan

26 Aug 2007 - 9:19pm
Jeff Howard
2004

One thing to clarify here. An MFA isn't a Masters in Fine Art
generically--it normally has an emphasis in a particular art. So an
MFA in Painting or Sculpture, or, for your purposes an MFA in Design.
Graphic Design is a common MFA and I know several who are talented
interaction designers as well.

I would be unlikely to hire someone with an MFA in painting or
sculpture. But I think they've come to terms with that.

// jeff

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the improved ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=19797

26 Aug 2007 - 9:28pm
Joseph Selbie
2007

I'd like to give you the answer to your direct question, but in all honesty
I have say that neither one would make a difference to me by itself. I would
want to know what they did with those degrees -- what grew out of the
education so to speak.

Joseph Selbie
Founder, CEO Tristream
http://www.tristream.com

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of dnp607
Sent: Sunday, August 26, 2007 5:59 PM
To: ixda
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Who would you hire?

Hi Folks,

If you were presented with two candidates for an Interaction Design
position (heavy on UI design and graphics), which type of candidate
would you lean towards: one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
Masters in Fine Art, or one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
Master's in Human Factors?

Assume that each candidate has similar ixdn work experience, and a
portfolio to match. The real difference here is the graduate work.

I know this question has a million variables, but generally speaking,
I'm curious to know if there's a bias one way or the other.

Why would you prefer one degree over the other?

Thanks for any assistance,
-Dan

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
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26 Aug 2007 - 10:58pm
Melvin Jay Kumar
2007

Degrees help if you knew what you wanted to study and took it becoz
you wanted to understand the theory to back up your empircal
experience. Gives you holistic understanding, helps you make decision,
new concepts, new ways of doing things etc...etc...

However, lots of people took the degree because someone told them its
a good field or its fast growing or you can make good money in it or
it complements your IT degree etc..etc...etc...

Untimately, I would say, you would want to understand why someone did
that degree and how it helped them, how they have made used of all
that learning etc..

Portfolios are good, but they don't tell a thing. Why? Most of them
time, you work in a team, the important decisions could have been made
by someone else and not that individual that you are interviewing. But
you can make use of the portfolio and ask them how they resolve an
issue with their experience and their theortical understanding.

But then in the corporate world whose got time to ask such questions
and the people who interview and recruit people don't really have the
knowledge to do all these thing. And lastly, do we really have a pool
of such qualified people?

Later

Jay Kumar

On 8/27/07, Joseph Selbie <jselbie at tristream.com> wrote:
> I'd like to give you the answer to your direct question, but in all honesty
> I have say that neither one would make a difference to me by itself. I would
> want to know what they did with those degrees -- what grew out of the
> education so to speak.
>
> Joseph Selbie
> Founder, CEO Tristream
> http://www.tristream.com
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of dnp607
> Sent: Sunday, August 26, 2007 5:59 PM
> To: ixda
> Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Who would you hire?
>
>
> Hi Folks,
>
> If you were presented with two candidates for an Interaction Design
> position (heavy on UI design and graphics), which type of candidate
> would you lean towards: one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
> Masters in Fine Art, or one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
> Master's in Human Factors?
>
> Assume that each candidate has similar ixdn work experience, and a
> portfolio to match. The real difference here is the graduate work.
>
> I know this question has a million variables, but generally speaking,
> I'm curious to know if there's a bias one way or the other.
>
> Why would you prefer one degree over the other?
>
> Thanks for any assistance,
> -Dan
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>

27 Aug 2007 - 9:24am
.pauric
2006

Hypothetical problems can be solved with hypothetical solutions...

var typeOfQualification = irrelevant;

function hire (
if (candidateA [looks - requestedCompensation] > candidateB)
then hire = A
else hire = B

for A=B call function coinToss

Goto next hire

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the improved ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=19797

27 Aug 2007 - 9:40am
Kiesel, Jeffrey...
2007

Hire the one who's personality fits best with your team. Chemistry is
so important for s great team.

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of
dnp607
Sent: Sunday, August 26, 2007 8:59 PM
To: ixda
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Who would you hire?

Hi Folks,

If you were presented with two candidates for an Interaction Design
position (heavy on UI design and graphics), which type of candidate
would you lean towards: one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
Masters in Fine Art, or one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
Master's in Human Factors?

Assume that each candidate has similar ixdn work experience, and a
portfolio to match. The real difference here is the graduate work.

I know this question has a million variables, but generally speaking,
I'm curious to know if there's a bias one way or the other.

Why would you prefer one degree over the other?

Thanks for any assistance,
-Dan

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
Questions .................. list at ixda.org
Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
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27 Aug 2007 - 12:01pm
DanP
2006

Thanks for all of your excellent answers and for being flexible with
this extreme hypothetical. I tend to agree with the sentiment that a
degree is only as useful as the person who wields it, but the
feedback has helped a great deal.

All the best,
-Dan

27 Aug 2007 - 3:37pm
Cwodtke
2004

My BFA is in photography, and my MFA (which is, admittedly EBT) would be
creative writing.

Can anyone recommend a councilor to help me work through my grief in not
getting hired by Jeff?

Thank god I got my first computer-y job in the boom, when "breathing"
was the degree most sought-after.

Jeff Howard wrote:
> I would be unlikely to hire someone with an MFA in painting or
> sculpture. But I think they've come to terms with that.
>
> // jeff
>

27 Aug 2007 - 3:34pm
Cwodtke
2004

I've hired a LOT of interaction designers, and degree in whatever rarely
affects my decision making process. That they got a degree at all is
nice, and a name school (like Carnegie Mellon) sometime catches my eye,
but I've always depended on (in order)

-who recommended them to me (not references, but originator)
-their design exercise
-they way they talk through their work
-portfolio (supporting work past what they walked me through)
-resume (first 1-3 job almost never look at second page)

and as far as I can tell, so do other hiring managers....

erpdesigner wrote:
> Not knowing what exact job description you are hiring for, or what type of company you work for, if both candidates are equal in qualification, then I'd suggest hiring the candidate that has the best personality and best experience that works with your team, the company and the project.
>
> As for the graduate degree, If the job involves some visual design, then I'd consider the candidate with the MFA if they showed a reasonable visual design portfolio in addition to the ID portfolio. If the job involves more usability testing, I'd consider the human factors person if they showed experience in testing I don't think I'd prefer one degree over the other, unless the person showed course work related to interaction design in their graduate degree program. Theoretically a person could go through an MFA program or an MS in Human Factors without taking a single course related to interaction design. You would not know unless you requested a transcript and took a long look at their coursework.
>
> Personally, I think the portfolio counts for a lot and personality is very important in choosing the right person. If a candidate's portfolio is not up to par, they won't make it past the front door. If they don't have the right personality to work with the team, then they won't stay in the job very long.
>
>
> -Wendy
> dnp607 <dnp607 at pacbell.net> wrote:
>
> Hi Folks,
>
> If you were presented with two candidates for an Interaction Design
> position (heavy on UI design and graphics), which type of candidate
> would you lean towards: one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
> Masters in Fine Art, or one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
> Master's in Human Factors?
>
> Assume that each candidate has similar ixdn work experience, and a
> portfolio to match. The real difference here is the graduate work.
>
> I know this question has a million variables, but generally speaking,
> I'm curious to know if there's a bias one way or the other.
>
> Why would you prefer one degree over the other?
>
> Thanks for any assistance,
> -Dan
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>

--
Christina Wodtke
Principal Instigator
415-577-2550

Business :: http://www.cucinamedia.com
Magazine :: http://www.boxesandarrows.com
Product :: http://www.publicsquarehq.com
Personal :: http://www.eleganthack.com
Book :: http://www.blueprintsfortheweb.com

cwodtke at eleganthack.com

27 Aug 2007 - 3:55pm
jayeffvee
2007

Well, the degree was in "Ability to Think": "Breathing" was the
prerequisite, if I remember correctly...

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of
Christina Wodtke
Sent: Monday, August 27, 2007 4:38 PM
To: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Who would you hire?

My BFA is in photography, and my MFA (which is, admittedly EBT) would be

creative writing.

Can anyone recommend a councilor to help me work through my grief in not

getting hired by Jeff?

Thank god I got my first computer-y job in the boom, when "breathing"
was the degree most sought-after.

Jeff Howard wrote:
> I would be unlikely to hire someone with an MFA in painting or
> sculpture. But I think they've come to terms with that.
>
> // jeff
>

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
Questions .................. list at ixda.org
Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org

27 Aug 2007 - 5:23pm
Jeff Howard
2004

Hi Christina,

Since you're not a painting or sculpture MFA, I'll let it slide
this time. But stay on the straight and narrow. :)

Not all MFAs are created equal. Both photography and creative writing
seem closer to design than painting or sculpture. Maybe there are a
few on the list, but my joke was about how painting and sculpture
MFAs don't go into it for the job security.

// jeff

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the improved ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=19797

27 Aug 2007 - 6:59pm
Cwodtke
2004

could be worse... you could be a .. gasp... English major!

(with apologies to garrison keeler)

Jeff Howard wrote:
> Hi Christina,
>
> Since you're not a painting or sculpture MFA, I'll let it slide
> this time. But stay on the straight and narrow. :)
>
> Not all MFAs are created equal. Both photography and creative writing
> seem closer to design than painting or sculpture. Maybe there are a
> few on the list, but my joke was about how painting and sculpture
> MFAs don't go into it for the job security.
>
> // jeff
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the improved ixda.org
> http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=19797
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>

--

Christina Wodtke
Principal Instigator
415-577-255

Magazine :: http://www.boxesandarrows.com
Business :: http://www.publicsqurehq.com
Personal :: http://www.eleganthack.com
Book :: http://www.blueprintsfortheweb.com

cwodtke at eleganthack.com

27 Aug 2007 - 8:17pm
Dante Murphy
2006

Melvin-

Having reviewed many portfolios, and having evaluated many candidates who did not have one, I can categorically disagree with your dismissal of them. I recently saw an excellent portfolio that demonstrated in its organization and presentation the qualities I seek in a candidate. Never mind that the content was very good, it was the design of the portfolio itself that impressed me the most.

I would much sooner take the candidate with the excellent portfolio mentioned above, even if all the work wasn't exclusively hers, than a boatful of PhD's in HF or HCI or whatever. If nobody else is interested in this kind of candidate, then fine...more for me.

Last thing...don't blame a recruiter or the corporation you work for if you can't find great candidates. They are out there, sometimes you just have to do a little legwork yourself, or be prepared to pay a bounty to a "headhunter" who will be happy to do it for you at a 20% fee.

Happy hunting,
Dante Murphy
Director of Information Architecture
Digitas Health

________________________________

From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com on behalf of Melvin Jay Kumar
Sent: Sun 8/26/2007 11:58 PM
To: Joseph Selbie
Cc: ixda
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Who would you hire?

Degrees help if you knew what you wanted to study and took it becoz
you wanted to understand the theory to back up your empircal
experience. Gives you holistic understanding, helps you make decision,
new concepts, new ways of doing things etc...etc...

However, lots of people took the degree because someone told them its
a good field or its fast growing or you can make good money in it or
it complements your IT degree etc..etc...etc...

Untimately, I would say, you would want to understand why someone did
that degree and how it helped them, how they have made used of all
that learning etc..

Portfolios are good, but they don't tell a thing. Why? Most of them
time, you work in a team, the important decisions could have been made
by someone else and not that individual that you are interviewing. But
you can make use of the portfolio and ask them how they resolve an
issue with their experience and their theortical understanding.

But then in the corporate world whose got time to ask such questions
and the people who interview and recruit people don't really have the
knowledge to do all these thing. And lastly, do we really have a pool
of such qualified people?

Later

Jay Kumar

On 8/27/07, Joseph Selbie <jselbie at tristream.com> wrote:
> I'd like to give you the answer to your direct question, but in all honesty
> I have say that neither one would make a difference to me by itself. I would
> want to know what they did with those degrees -- what grew out of the
> education so to speak.
>
> Joseph Selbie
> Founder, CEO Tristream
> http://www.tristream.com <http://www.tristream.com/>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of dnp607
> Sent: Sunday, August 26, 2007 5:59 PM
> To: ixda
> Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Who would you hire?
>
>
> Hi Folks,
>
> If you were presented with two candidates for an Interaction Design
> position (heavy on UI design and graphics), which type of candidate
> would you lean towards: one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
> Masters in Fine Art, or one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
> Master's in Human Factors?
>
> Assume that each candidate has similar ixdn work experience, and a
> portfolio to match. The real difference here is the graduate work.
>
> I know this question has a million variables, but generally speaking,
> I'm curious to know if there's a bias one way or the other.
>
> Why would you prefer one degree over the other?
>
> Thanks for any assistance,
> -Dan
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org <http://beta.ixda.org/>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org <http://beta.ixda.org/>
>
________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
Questions .................. list at ixda.org
Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org <http://beta.ixda.org/>

27 Aug 2007 - 9:10pm
Melvin Jay Kumar
2007

Hi Dante,

Thank you for your comments.

I think you got me wrong. Maybe?

If you are making your decision by just looking at the portfolios, I
would have to disagree with you respectfully. That excellent portfolio
you saw might be great, but how certain are you that the person who
send it to you is the one who created it ?

The rational and decision for that design, for that organization
etc... that so much appeals to you could have been decided by someone
else. So, you 're gonna hire the person becoz of what you saw in that
portfolio?

Well, I won't. It's just my experience which has let to distrust portfolios. =)

I need to review the other aspects like how Christina mentioned. We
just have to agree to disagree. =).

About recruitment : What if your organization doesn't want to pay for
that 20% and doesn't allow you to use other recruitment resources and
doesn't allow you to recommend anyone, everyone has to submit through
this one single entry place, one process etc...etc...?

Later.,

Jay Kumar

On 8/28/07, Dante Murphy <dmurphy at digitashealth.com> wrote:
> Melvin-
>
> Having reviewed many portfolios, and having evaluated many candidates who did not have one, I can categorically disagree with your dismissal of them. I recently saw an excellent portfolio that demonstrated in its organization and presentation the qualities I seek in a candidate. Never mind that the content was very good, it was the design of the portfolio itself that impressed me the most.
>
> I would much sooner take the candidate with the excellent portfolio mentioned above, even if all the work wasn't exclusively hers, than a boatful of PhD's in HF or HCI or whatever. If nobody else is interested in this kind of candidate, then fine...more for me.
>
> Last thing...don't blame a recruiter or the corporation you work for if you can't find great candidates. They are out there, sometimes you just have to do a little legwork yourself, or be prepared to pay a bounty to a "headhunter" who will be happy to do it for you at a 20% fee.
>
> Happy hunting,
> Dante Murphy
> Director of Information Architecture
> Digitas Health
>
> ________________________________
>
> From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com on behalf of Melvin Jay Kumar
> Sent: Sun 8/26/2007 11:58 PM
> To: Joseph Selbie
> Cc: ixda
> Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Who would you hire?
>
>
>
> Degrees help if you knew what you wanted to study and took it becoz
> you wanted to understand the theory to back up your empircal
> experience. Gives you holistic understanding, helps you make decision,
> new concepts, new ways of doing things etc...etc...
>
> However, lots of people took the degree because someone told them its
> a good field or its fast growing or you can make good money in it or
> it complements your IT degree etc..etc...etc...
>
> Untimately, I would say, you would want to understand why someone did
> that degree and how it helped them, how they have made used of all
> that learning etc..
>
> Portfolios are good, but they don't tell a thing. Why? Most of them
> time, you work in a team, the important decisions could have been made
> by someone else and not that individual that you are interviewing. But
> you can make use of the portfolio and ask them how they resolve an
> issue with their experience and their theortical understanding.
>
> But then in the corporate world whose got time to ask such questions
> and the people who interview and recruit people don't really have the
> knowledge to do all these thing. And lastly, do we really have a pool
> of such qualified people?
>
> Later
>
> Jay Kumar
>
> On 8/27/07, Joseph Selbie <jselbie at tristream.com> wrote:
> > I'd like to give you the answer to your direct question, but in all honesty
> > I have say that neither one would make a difference to me by itself. I would
> > want to know what they did with those degrees -- what grew out of the
> > education so to speak.
> >
> > Joseph Selbie
> > Founder, CEO Tristream
> > http://www.tristream.com <http://www.tristream.com/>
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> > [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of dnp607
> > Sent: Sunday, August 26, 2007 5:59 PM
> > To: ixda
> > Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Who would you hire?
> >
> >
> > Hi Folks,
> >
> > If you were presented with two candidates for an Interaction Design
> > position (heavy on UI design and graphics), which type of candidate
> > would you lean towards: one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
> > Masters in Fine Art, or one with an Industrial Design Bachelors and a
> > Master's in Human Factors?
> >
> > Assume that each candidate has similar ixdn work experience, and a
> > portfolio to match. The real difference here is the graduate work.
> >
> > I know this question has a million variables, but generally speaking,
> > I'm curious to know if there's a bias one way or the other.
> >
> > Why would you prefer one degree over the other?
> >
> > Thanks for any assistance,
> > -Dan
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
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> >
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
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> >
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
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>
>
>

28 Aug 2007 - 2:03am
milan
2005

Hi,

> If you are making your decision by just looking at the portfolios, I
> would have to disagree with you respectfully. That excellent portfolio
> you saw might be great, but how certain are you that the person who
> send it to you is the one who created it ?

To avoid such a misconception it's imho the best option to do a in-depth
walk through the portfolio with the candidate during an interview.

You can ask specific questions (e.g. why did you place the button here
etc.) to find out about potential claims for something what is not
his/hers. This works very good for technical or development details, but
also for ixd questions.

I agree that a degree should not be the crucial factor for a hire, but to
ask why a candidate chose a certain program and what he/she did there can
lead to interesting insights. Especially if the portfolio shows a clear
link between education and work samples.

regards
milan
--
||| | | |||| || |||||||| | || | ||
milan guenther * interaction design

designing the information workplace
p +49 173 2856689 * www.guenther.cx

28 Aug 2007 - 7:40am
Jim Hoekema
2004

Not to mention art history.

Christina Wodtke wrote:
> could be worse... you could be a .. gasp... English major!
>
> (with apologies to garrison keeler)
>
> Jeff Howard wrote:
>
>> Hi Christina,
>>
>> Since you're not a painting or sculpture MFA, I'll let it slide
>> this time. But stay on the straight and narrow. :)
>>
>> Not all MFAs are created equal. Both photography and creative writing
>> seem closer to design than painting or sculpture. Maybe there are a
>> few on the list, but my joke was about how painting and sculpture
>> MFAs don't go into it for the job security.
>>
>> // jeff
>>
>>
>> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
>> Posted from the improved ixda.org
>> http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=19797
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
>> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>>
>>
>
>

--

__________________________________________
HDE . www.hoekema.com <http://www.hoekema.com> . (845) 401-7466

28 Aug 2007 - 11:12am
ldebett
2004

And you were a shoe-in if you had that Masters in "passion".

On 8/27/07, Vermette, Joan <Joan.Vermette at fmr.com> wrote:
>
> Well, the degree was in "Ability to Think": "Breathing" was the
> prerequisite, if I remember correctly...
>
> -----Original Message-----
>
> Thank god I got my first computer-y job in the boom, when "breathing"
> was the degree most sought-after.
>

29 Aug 2007 - 3:35am
Adrian Howard
2005

On 28 Aug 2007, at 08:03, Milan Guenther wrote:

> Hi,
>
>> If you are making your decision by just looking at the portfolios, I
>> would have to disagree with you respectfully. That excellent
>> portfolio
>> you saw might be great, but how certain are you that the person who
>> send it to you is the one who created it ?
>
> To avoid such a misconception it's imho the best option to do a in-
> depth
> walk through the portfolio with the candidate during an interview.
[snip]

I like portfolio walkthroughs too - and find them useful.

However what I _really_ like is sitting down with the designer for an
hour or so, talk through a real problem with them (usually whatever
I'm working on at the time) and getting them to do some... y'know...
actual design!

I always learn much more about how a person will fit in by seeing
them work. Don't hire a juggler without seeing them juggle and all
that :-)

Cheers,

Adrian

31 Aug 2007 - 9:15am
Cindi Thomas
2006

I would be happy just to have two viable candidates to be considering! :)

But I echo the sentiments regarding personality fit. If that isn\'t in place, no matter how well they communicate/think/design will overcome that kind of mismatch.

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