Rockstars and Professional Development (was: Hiring Strategies)

2 Oct 2007 - 1:14pm
6 years ago
3 replies
595 reads
david.shaw6@gma...
2004

Hi Will,

Yes, I've seen that too. Unfortunately, with the current state of the
market how can someone hire rock stars when there are more jobs than
candidates to fill the shoes. That, and rockstars normally have egos
that decimate the team they join (I've witnessed this) because no one
wants to work with an arrogant person in a team environment.

>From my experience, a company who doesn't contribute to professional
development is not one worth working for. Skills and technologies
change too often, and without a company footing the bill to keep you
current (to tackle future problems for said company), why would you
want to work for such a company. It's almost as if they're saying,
"we don't care about you and your skills, we just want you to make
money for us." I don't buy into that. It's a shared responsibility,
and one that makes for a much happier employee. One that doesn't need
to do his/her continuing education during family time - one who'll be
more passionate about coming to work for a company who cares.

As for companies, every single company I have ever worked for has had
some type of budget for training/development. This from both small
companies to the fortune 500's I've worked for. I've never seen or
heard of a company that explicitly says training is on your own.

Just my 2 cents.

David

On Tue, 2 Oct 2007 05:19:42, Will Evans <wkevans4 at gmail.com> wrote:
> Dan wrote: "The desire to do great work, keep learning, and always
> add value is what gets my interest."
>
> Given two candidates, one with a 10 in passion for IxD, 7 in skills -
> the other with a 7 in passion and a 10 in skills, I would probably opt
> for the more passionate candidate, assuming they are also passionate
> about learning :-)
>
> Speaking of learning - has anyone noticed a shift over the past 10
> years in many businesses in which hiring has shifted away from
> growing great people, their knowledge, the development - to hiring
> rockstars? It seems that I have noticed many more companies that are
> unwilling to pay for continuing education, professional development,
> training, etc. I can't think that my company is the only one that
> explicitly does not pay for training or professional development and
> believes that any an employee does should be done on their own time,
> on their own dime.
> Maybe we could start another thread on professional development and
> training for people in the UX community. Which companies support it -
> which ones don't...
>
> -Will
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the improved ixda.org
> http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=20918
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
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--

w: http://www.davidshaw.info

Comments

2 Oct 2007 - 2:30pm
White, Jeff
2007

This is the first I've seen or heard of companies not supporting
professional development. I'm in year 5 of my career, so I haven't been
around as long as many on this list which might explain why.

But I tell you what, that sounds ridiculous to me and I wouldn't accept an
offer from a company with this approach. At my current job, professional
development is not only encouraged, it's a formal part of my career ladder.
The more active I am in professional memberships, having papers, books or
articles published or speak at conferences, the more the fellows upstairs
signing checks like me. We are absolutely encouraged from the top down to
become active in our respective communities. We also are required to carve
out 2-4 hours each week of company time for professional development. I love
it and think it's simply good business.

Jeff

2 Oct 2007 - 3:29pm
.pauric
2006

Jeff: "This is the first I've seen or heard of companies not
supporting professional development... it's simply good business."

In an ideal world, everything would be simple.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the improved ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=21021

2 Oct 2007 - 4:54pm
Chauncey Wilson
2007

Hiring Rock Stars (not sure if that is really the appropriate metaphor) is
one issue, but the other issue is that once a rock star is hired (and let's
assume that the rock star is a humble sort who does not decimate a team)
manager and other colleagues have to be careful not to refer to the person
as a rock star too much in front of the team. Managers and colleagues can,
unconsciously in many cases, glorify the rock star and fail to notice other,
perhaps quieter, extremely good people who might even surpass the rock star
at some point in selected areas. Something as simple as hearing "he/she is
really great" too often can result in subtle, but powerful messages of
favoritism ("they get to go to the design conference all the time while I
toil away doing cluster analysis on the data for the conference) and affect
team dynamics.

Chauncey

On 10/2/07, David Shaw <david.shaw6 at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Hi Will,
>
> Yes, I've seen that too. Unfortunately, with the current state of the
> market how can someone hire rock stars when there are more jobs than
> candidates to fill the shoes. That, and rockstars normally have egos
> that decimate the team they join (I've witnessed this) because no one
> wants to work with an arrogant person in a team environment.
>
> >From my experience, a company who doesn't contribute to professional
> development is not one worth working for. Skills and technologies
> change too often, and without a company footing the bill to keep you
> current (to tackle future problems for said company), why would you
> want to work for such a company. It's almost as if they're saying,
> "we don't care about you and your skills, we just want you to make
> money for us." I don't buy into that. It's a shared responsibility,
> and one that makes for a much happier employee. One that doesn't need
> to do his/her continuing education during family time - one who'll be
> more passionate about coming to work for a company who cares.
>
> As for companies, every single company I have ever worked for has had
> some type of budget for training/development. This from both small
> companies to the fortune 500's I've worked for. I've never seen or
> heard of a company that explicitly says training is on your own.
>
> Just my 2 cents.
>
> David
>
> On Tue, 2 Oct 2007 05:19:42, Will Evans <wkevans4 at gmail.com> wrote:
> > Dan wrote: "The desire to do great work, keep learning, and always
> > add value is what gets my interest."
> >
> > Given two candidates, one with a 10 in passion for IxD, 7 in skills -
> > the other with a 7 in passion and a 10 in skills, I would probably opt
> > for the more passionate candidate, assuming they are also passionate
> > about learning :-)
> >
> > Speaking of learning - has anyone noticed a shift over the past 10
> > years in many businesses in which hiring has shifted away from
> > growing great people, their knowledge, the development - to hiring
> > rockstars? It seems that I have noticed many more companies that are
> > unwilling to pay for continuing education, professional development,
> > training, etc. I can't think that my company is the only one that
> > explicitly does not pay for training or professional development and
> > believes that any an employee does should be done on their own time,
> > on their own dime.
> > Maybe we could start another thread on professional development and
> > training for people in the UX community. Which companies support it -
> > which ones don't...
> >
> > -Will
> >
> >
> > . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> > Posted from the improved ixda.org
> > http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=20918
> >
> >
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> > Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
> >
>
>
> --
>
> w: http://www.davidshaw.info
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>

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