How to help a new employee to get started

16 Nov 2007 - 3:46pm
6 years ago
5 replies
465 reads
beril guvendik
2006

I am looking for insight and best practices to how to help a new designer
get started with the team, company and the product. I haven't been in a
situation where I was responsible for this so I am slightly at a loss.

How do you approach getting a new designer familiar with everything. What is
a good way to spend the first day? What is a good day to spend the first
week? Is there anything you ask them to do specifically to benefit from
their fresh status? For example, I wish to ask our new team-mate to record
her first impressions about the product she will be working on - before she
gets too familiar with processes, schedules and the products themselves.

I am looking forward to the recommendations.

Thanks!
Beril Guvendik

Comments

16 Nov 2007 - 3:59pm
SemanticWill
2007

That's a great question Beril. We dont have alot of conversations here
about training up new people. Of course hazing rituals are a must! I
am excited to hear what the list thinks.

will evans
user experience architect
wkevans4 at gmail.com
617.281.1281

On Nov 16, 2007, at 3:46 PM, "Beril Guvendik"
<berilguvendik at gmail.com> wrote:

> I am looking for insight and best practices to how to help a new
> designer
> get started with the team, company and the product. I haven't been
> in a
> situation where I was responsible for this so I am slightly at a loss.
>
> How do you approach getting a new designer familiar with everything.
> What is
> a good way to spend the first day? What is a good day to spend the
> first
> week? Is there anything you ask them to do specifically to benefit
> from
> their fresh status? For example, I wish to ask our new team-mate to
> record
> her first impressions about the product she will be working on -
> before she
> gets too familiar with processes, schedules and the products
> themselves.
>
> I am looking forward to the recommendations.
>
> Thanks!
> Beril Guvendik
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

16 Nov 2007 - 8:53pm
Trip O'Dell
2007

It really depends on what is important to convey. Having recently
started a new job, the hardest thing to get used to was the culture
of the office. How people did things. I still struggle with all the
little details of what assets are on which server, website, etc. But
I also work for a 6000 person company...

Buddy systems can work if the right personality is involved. The best
implementation I ever experienced was when I was teaching. The school
paired young teachers (in their first 3 years of teaching) with
master teachers who had been at it more than 10 years. It was helpful
not only in orienting within the school but professionally.

The mentor doesn't even need to be in the same discipline/job role
as the new hire - the important thing is the personality - you want
someone who is open, friendly and knows the organization. One of the
most difficult things about joining a new place is being afraid of
bothering people with "stupid" questions

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=22702

17 Nov 2007 - 7:01am
Kel Smith
2007

First week, schedule arranged lunches with various members of the
organization. Doesn't have to be someone within your team - just
names and faces to establish some familiarity. Then introduce project
scope and get her fresh take on processes, concepts, etc. Most of all,
include her on meetings relevant to the project she'll be working on;
emphasize that she's not yet expected to contribute meaningful,
although her thoughts are cheerfully anticipated.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://gamma.ixda.org/discuss?post=22702

17 Nov 2007 - 10:00am
Mark Schraad
2006

I believe very strongly that designers, while more comfortable
hanging out with other designers, should make a concerted effort to
learn about the dev, sales, marketing and other functions within the
company. While it makes sense for new employees to bond with other
team members in the first few weeks at a new job... get them into
meetings where they will meet folks from other departments fairly
quickly. Good cross departmental insight and even empathy will
increase the teams effectiveness.

Mark

On Nov 16, 2007, at 3:46 PM, Beril Guvendik wrote:

> I am looking for insight and best practices to how to help a new
> designer
> get started with the team, company and the product. I haven't been
> in a
> situation where I was responsible for this so I am slightly at a loss.
>
> How do you approach getting a new designer familiar with
> everything. What is
> a good way to spend the first day? What is a good day to spend the
> first
> week? Is there anything you ask them to do specifically to benefit
> from
> their fresh status? For example, I wish to ask our new team-mate to
> record
> her first impressions about the product she will be working on -
> before she
> gets too familiar with processes, schedules and the products
> themselves.
>
> I am looking forward to the recommendations.
>

18 Nov 2007 - 11:45am
Chauncey Wilson
2007

Hello Beril,

You ask an excellent question. I've managed several groups and also
recently been on the end of the new person in design/usability
positions. Here are some thoughts.

1. Consider getting the person into training on your products right
away (the second week). This might be online training, formal
training, or even better as I did 4 months ago, attend training with
actual customers at a 3rd party training company where I got a chance
to see how people perceived our product. Having some product training
right away can help the new colleague become credible faster.
2. Think hard about what you tell people about others. This is a
subtle thing but sometimes new colleagues are "warned" so much about
particular people that their relationship be affected. There is a
very fine balance here where you don't want to impose your
relationship or beliefs about others too strongly on the new person.
3. Create a diagram of who the person should meet over the next month
or so and facilitate some meetings with those people, but let the
person also set up some meetings of introduction. Your diagram with
notes about roles and projects could be quite useful.
4. Help new colleagues understand the unwritten rules of the
organization so they don't commit any serious errors that will haunt
them.
5. Provide a list of key resources and the URLs or directories where
things can be found. This will be quite appreciated in these days of
messy intranets and obscure SharePoint sites. Finding things in new
organizations can be a Hellish thing and more experienced colleagues
often, without realizing it, throw out references that they have
memorized or bookmarked like "Oh, it's in the group design directory
under the gorbleblick folder -- just scroll down a few pages and
you'll see the link that is something like .....".
6. You mentioned getting a designer's first impressions of the
product -- good idea though I've seen that backfire when the new
person gets a bit overzealous and shows his/her 50 pages of problems
or design flaws to the wrong person who happended to be the chief and
highly respected designer or developer. I would ask the person to
write down any design issues that he/she sees, and then engage in a
discussion about the product and findings discreetly -- as part of
training almost.

I think that you asked a very good question since the first few weeks
can often set the tone for the next few years with new colleagues.

Chauncey
5.

On Nov 16, 2007 3:46 PM, Beril Guvendik <berilguvendik at gmail.com> wrote:
> I am looking for insight and best practices to how to help a new designer
> get started with the team, company and the product. I haven't been in a
> situation where I was responsible for this so I am slightly at a loss.
>
> How do you approach getting a new designer familiar with everything. What is
> a good way to spend the first day? What is a good day to spend the first
> week? Is there anything you ask them to do specifically to benefit from
> their fresh status? For example, I wish to ask our new team-mate to record
> her first impressions about the product she will be working on - before she
> gets too familiar with processes, schedules and the products themselves.
>
> I am looking forward to the recommendations.
>
> Thanks!
> Beril Guvendik
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

Syndicate content Get the feed