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21 Nov 2007 - 8:12am
6 years ago
7 replies
399 reads
brianh
2010

> -----Original Message-----
> I think Luke W's article (posted on this thread previously) answers a
> lot of our questions based on research and statistical data. Primary
> button should be on the left, secondary button on the right. Buttons
> should be left aligned.
>
> -Juan
[Brian Hoffman]

Greetings everyone! New subscriber here.

Unless I'm missing something, I don't believe this conclusion can be
drawn from Luke W's article. Of the options he studied, none of them had
the primary button to the right next to the secondary button with both
of them left aligned. Only one of the variations had the primary button
to the right of the secondary button and in that case the buttons were
fill-justified, which could make an enormous difference with a
left-justified form.

What I'm wondering is, did participants have the option to hit "Enter"
on their keyboard instead of clicking on a button to submit the form
and, if so, how many people used that option and never even looked at
the buttons?

Thanks,

Brian J. Hoffman
Interface Designer
Minitab Inc.
Quality Plaza
1829 Pine Hall Road
State College, PA 16801-3008
USA/CAN/MEX: +1 800 448-3555 Ext.#514
Tel: +1 814-238-3280 Ext.#514
Fax: +1 814-238-4383
Web site: www.minitab.com

Comments

21 Nov 2007 - 11:04am
Todd Warfel
2003

Excellent question. Luke, any insights into this? I don't think this
was mentioned in the article.

There's definitely some good data in the article/test summary info.
But this just goes to show you that designing tests aren't as easy as
you might think.

On Nov 21, 2007, at 8:12 AM, Brian Hoffman wrote:

> What I'm wondering is, did participants have the option to hit
> "Enter" on their keyboard instead of clicking on a button to submit
> the form and, if so, how many people used that option and never even
> looked at the buttons?

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design Researcher
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

21 Nov 2007 - 11:58am
LukeW
2004

All of the participants (23) used the buttons on all of the options
(6). So 138 times out of 138 tested, no on used hit "Enter" to
complete a form.

The options we chose were based off an audit of Web forms not desktop
apps. Hence why you don't see some of the variations you are asking
about. I pulled the most common solutions that came up. thanks~

On Nov 21, 2007, at 8:04 AM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:
> Excellent question. Luke, any insights into this? I don't think this
> was mentioned in the article.

::
:: Luke Wroblewski -[ www.lukew.com ]
:: Principal/Founder, LukeW Interface Designs
:: luke at lukew.com | 408.513.7207
::
:: Blog: http://www.lukew.com/ff/
:: Book: http://www.lukew.com/resources/site_seeing.html
::

21 Nov 2007 - 2:16pm
Todd Warfel
2003

Thanks for the additional info, Luke.

On the web forms audit, you didn't find any web forms that use the
model of buttons right aligned with the default button to the right
and subsequent to the left? I find that a bit unusual, unless you were
focused on a specific subset, as that's a pretty common model I
regularly see, especially when shopping on-line, which came over from
desktop applications.

On Nov 21, 2007, at 11:58 AM, Luke Wroblewski wrote:

> All of the participants (23) used the buttons on all of the options
> (6). So 138 times out of 138 tested, no on used hit "Enter" to
> complete a form.
>
> The options we chose were based off an audit of Web forms not
> desktop apps. Hence why you don't see some of the variations you are
> asking about. I pulled the most common solutions that came up. thanks~
>

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design Researcher
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

21 Nov 2007 - 2:25pm
LukeW
2004

saw some but much higher amount of primary button on the right alone.
Or primary button on the right & secondary action on the left (of the
page).
We didn't test the first, cause no secondary action. We tested the
second.

On Nov 21, 2007, at 11:16 AM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:

> On the web forms audit, you didn't find any web forms that use the
> model of buttons right aligned with the default button to the right
> and subsequent to the left? I find that a bit unusual, unless you
> were focused on a specific subset, as that's a pretty common model I
> regularly see, especially when shopping on-line, which came over
> from desktop applications.

::
:: Luke Wroblewski -[ www.lukew.com ]
:: Principal/Founder, LukeW Interface Designs
:: luke at lukew.com | 408.513.7207
::
:: Blog: http://www.lukew.com/ff/
:: Book: http://www.lukew.com/resources/site_seeing.html
::

21 Nov 2007 - 2:31pm
Todd Warfel
2003

Got it. Looking at the results, looks like you focused on transaction
based sites. Any specific type (e.g. shopping, account management,
travel, hotel booking)? What was the make up of the sites you sampled
for the models for testing? Also wondering if these were UK vs. US or
another country focused sites. Just wondering if that might have
contributed to the models you saw. I'm curious if there's some
cultural impact here or not.

On Nov 21, 2007, at 2:25 PM, Luke Wroblewski wrote:

> saw some but much higher amount of primary button on the right
> alone. Or primary button on the right & secondary action on the left
> (of the page). We didn't test the first, cause no secondary action.
> We tested the second.

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design Researcher
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

21 Nov 2007 - 3:00pm
LukeW
2004

US. e-commerce, registration, data entry mix.

On Nov 21, 2007, at 11:31 AM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:

> Got it. Looking at the results, looks like you focused on
> transaction based sites. Any specific type (e.g. shopping, account
> management, travel, hotel booking)? What was the make up of the
> sites you sampled for the models for testing? Also wondering if
> these were UK vs. US or another country focused sites. Just
> wondering if that might have contributed to the models you saw. I'm
> curious if there's some cultural impact here or not.
>

::
:: Luke Wroblewski -[ www.lukew.com ]
:: Principal/Founder, LukeW Interface Designs
:: luke at lukew.com | 408.513.7207
::
:: Blog: http://www.lukew.com/ff/
:: Book: http://www.lukew.com/resources/site_seeing.html
::

22 Nov 2007 - 2:13pm
cfmdesigns
2004

This doesn't surprise me.

Enter (and other keyboard actions to activate form/dialog controls)
are a power user activity. (So I'll bet no one exited with Esc or
tabbed through controls, either.) There's a level of "trust" (for
lack of a better word) that has to be established before users are
only going to engage in power activities. The first time in a given
form or in a given app, they are going to act cautious and
conservative and will not use such shortcuts, because they aren't sure
that the app will behave like it should in non-power scenarios.

(Exception: if they are "testing" the form rather than "using" it, if
they are looking for problems, then you may get power behavior right
out of the gate.)

-- Jim Drew
cfmdesigns at earthlink.net
http://www.soundskinky.com/blog/

On Nov 21, 2007, at 8:58 AM, Luke Wroblewski wrote:

> All of the participants (23) used the buttons on all of the options
> (6). So 138 times out of 138 tested, no on used hit "Enter" to
> complete a form.
>
> On Nov 21, 2007, at 8:04 AM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:
>> Excellent question. Luke, any insights into this? I don't think this
>> was mentioned in the article.
>

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