On the topic of twitter - Why?

14 Dec 2007 - 8:55pm
6 years ago
20 replies
943 reads
Dave Malouf
2005

A few interesting thoughts here.
First off: (http://twitter.com/daveixd)

What is interesting is that almost everyone has looked at this question from
the Poster's point of view and not the reader's. Very interesting. I LOVE
reading my twitter follower's feed. Sometimes its a bit much when David
Armano is at a conference, or Thomas Vander Wal is traveling around the
world (I mean how many times can one man be stuck on a tarmack?).

But it is a great way for me to not be connected (that's like 'ease of
use'), but rather to get new insights into the lives of.

Examples. I have met with, corresponded with, even planned a conference with
Dan Saffer, but I only found out through twitter that he plays cello.

There are a million such situations like this.

Now going back to the other side of it (and I'm concentrating on twitter).

First off, I don't think of it as micro-blogging. It is not a log in any
sense of the term for me, the way a blog is, or maybe it is more like a log
than a blog is. But it is so much about the way I monitor it. The fact that
it can come into so many different platforms and they are all push (by
choice/selection). And I can push back through all of those same platforms
as well.

Next thing, it is sometimes an easier (and also cheaper) way to SMS someone,
especially someone around the world. I love doing back and forth direct
message conversations with Daniel Szuc in Hong Kong (or wherever he is this
week -- I think Taipei). The fact that I even know he is in Taipei would
have never happened before twitter.

A great resource to look up about all this are some of the talks on Leisa's
blog www.disambiguity.com. Just look for "ambient intimacy".

On a separate note, this is also why I use facebook. It's stream/feed is
also a great way to relate to people in a different way.

-- dave

--
David Malouf
http://synapticburn.com/
http://ixda.org/
http://motorola.com/

Comments

15 Dec 2007 - 11:17am
Katie Ware
2007

I'm glad you mentioned Facebook. I'm a fairly recent convert to FB and have found it fascinating. I'd say more about that except it's the morning after the company holiday party and my brain hasn't quite kicked in yet.

In relation to this thread though, I must confess I didn't really understand the whole twitter thing. But I do now - and it's (to me anyway) because of the FB status statements. You get an idea what people are up to, thinking about right then. As long as they update the status often. And some friends have their twitter in their status. So, now I understand twitter to be the FB status on steroids.

> Date: Fri, 14 Dec 2007 20:55:31 -0500> From: dave.ixd at gmail.com> To: discuss at ixda.org> Subject: [IxDA Discuss] On the topic of twitter - Why?> > A few interesting thoughts here.> First off: (http://twitter.com/daveixd)> > What is interesting is that almost everyone has looked at this question from> the Poster's point of view and not the reader's. Very interesting. I LOVE> reading my twitter follower's feed. Sometimes its a bit much when David> Armano is at a conference, or Thomas Vander Wal is traveling around the> world (I mean how many times can one man be stuck on a tarmack?).> > But it is a great way for me to not be connected (that's like 'ease of> use'), but rather to get new insights into the lives of.> > Examples. I have met with, corresponded with, even planned a conference with> Dan Saffer, but I only found out through twitter that he plays cello.> > There are a million such situations like this.> > Now going back to the other side of it (and I'm concentrating on twitter).> > First off, I don't think of it as micro-blogging. It is not a log in any> sense of the term for me, the way a blog is, or maybe it is more like a log> than a blog is. But it is so much about the way I monitor it. The fact that> it can come into so many different platforms and they are all push (by> choice/selection). And I can push back through all of those same platforms> as well.> > Next thing, it is sometimes an easier (and also cheaper) way to SMS someone,> especially someone around the world. I love doing back and forth direct> message conversations with Daniel Szuc in Hong Kong (or wherever he is this> week -- I think Taipei). The fact that I even know he is in Taipei would> have never happened before twitter.> > A great resource to look up about all this are some of the talks on Leisa's> blog www.disambiguity.com. Just look for "ambient intimacy".> > On a separate note, this is also why I use facebook. It's stream/feed is> also a great way to relate to people in a different way.> > -- dave> > -- > David Malouf> http://synapticburn.com/> http://ixda.org/> http://motorola.com/> ________________________________________________________________> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/> > ________________________________________________________________> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
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15 Dec 2007 - 11:41am
Dave Malouf
2005

One other caveat about this stuff that I always remind myself. ...
"First and foremost for me it is entertainment. It is he reality TV show I
get to "watch" 24/7 about all the connected (ie. digitally connected) people
in my life."

It includes tweets, flicks, facebook statuses, irovrs and more.

But it is still entertainment.

Yes, people are trying to find business models out of it, but to me it is
just plain old good fun w/ people I like &/or have respect for.

-- dave

15 Dec 2007 - 12:38pm
Katie Ware
2007

Oh I think it's way more than entertainment. It's huge in how it is changing the way people communicate and interact with each other. And I'm speaking a little broader here - facebook in general vs. just the statuses. I have been able to start a dialogue with my niece on FB when she would never pick up the phone and call me. I'm "fb friends" with people I haven't seen in years and now know quite a bit about their current lives. It's redefining what relationships are.

Of course, it's not all about facebook - these things can happen other ways online, but it is an interesting laboratory to see these shifts.

>> One other caveat about this stuff that I always remind myself. ...> "First and foremost for me it is entertainment. It is he reality TV show I> get to "watch" 24/7 about all the connected (ie. digitally connected) people> in my life."> > It includes tweets, flicks, facebook statuses, irovrs and more.> > But it is still entertainment.> > Yes, people are trying to find business models out of it, but to me it is> just plain old good fun w/ people I like &/or have respect for.> > -- dave>
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15 Dec 2007 - 4:25pm
Mark Schraad
2006

Hi Katie,

I think you are exactly right about the potential here. While I have
benefited greatly by participating in social networks for years they
have always been professional in nature. I also spend considerable
time attempting to evaluate the business potential of these social
innovations (sorry, its an occupational hazard). I have found folks
in the last few years sing facebook, myspace and even blogging that
were long forgotten. I have a terrible tendency towards the 'out of
sight - out of mind' syndrome. Where letters and phone calls just
don't work for me, the instant nature nature of chat, texting and the
current generation of social networks work for me. I have yet to dive
into twitter... I just can't imagine that my mutterings or mundane
observations would be of any interest to someone as I broadcast them.
It may be a case of taking things a bit to far... but this is how we
find these things out. And it may in fact, not be too much minutia as
we learn to filter for relevance and context. The elimination of
geography and time in socially connecting is proving quite valuable
and will no doubt have a profound effect on us going forward. Cool
stuff.

Mark

On Dec 15, 2007, at 12:38 PM, Katie Ware wrote:

> Oh I think it's way more than entertainment. It's huge in how it is
> changing the way people communicate and interact with each other.
> And I'm speaking a little broader here - facebook in general vs.
> just the statuses. I have been able to start a dialogue with my
> niece on FB when she would never pick up the phone and call me. I'm
> "fb friends" with people I haven't seen in years and now know quite
> a bit about their current lives. It's redefining what relationships
> are.
>
> Of course, it's not all about facebook - these things can happen
> other ways online, but it is an interesting laboratory to see these
> shifts.
>
>
>>> One other caveat about this stuff that I always remind
>>> myself. ...> "First and foremost for me it is entertainment. It
>>> is he reality TV show I> get to "watch" 24/7 about all the
>>> connected (ie. digitally connected) people> in my life."> > It
>>> includes tweets, flicks, facebook statuses, irovrs and more.> >
>>> But it is still entertainment.> > Yes, people are trying to find
>>> business models out of it, but to me it is> just plain old good
>>> fun w/ people I like &/or have respect for.> > -- dave>
> _________________________________________________________________
>

15 Dec 2007 - 11:17pm
dszuc
2005

"interesting laboratory to see these shifts." - Yup. I find it fun to
just be a part of these social experiments :)

Will the same services hold our attention in the next few years?

rgds,
Dan in Taipei - http://twitter.com/dszuc

On 16/12/2007, at 1:38 AM, Katie Ware wrote:

> Oh I think it's way more than entertainment. It's huge in how it is
> changing the way people communicate and interact with each other.
> And I'm speaking a little broader here - facebook in general vs.
> just the statuses. I have been able to start a dialogue with my
> niece on FB when she would never pick up the phone and call me. I'm
> "fb friends" with people I haven't seen in years and now know quite
> a bit about their current lives. It's redefining what relationships
> are.
>
> Of course, it's not all about facebook - these things can happen
> other ways online, but it is an interesting laboratory to see these
> shifts.
>

16 Dec 2007 - 8:43am
.pauric
2006

Mark: "I just can't imagine that my mutterings or mundane
observations would be of any interest to someone as I broadcast
them."

I with you on that and I've wondered why. I do think there is a lot
to be drawn from Jerome Ryckborst's anthropological take in the other
thread - http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=23528#23563
I'm a lot like my father when it comes to a lack of motivation to
mutter, make small talk, 'tweet' in social scenarios, and he like
his father, however other people in the town I grew up certainly made
up for that. My theory is that the twittering phenomenon is
time/space agnostic. The current generation of cloud communication
tools are just re-enabling needs that have not been satisfactorily
met since humans moved out of the village town hall, pub "where
everyone knows your name", post office, etc..

Mark: "The elimination of geography and time in socially connecting
is proving quite valuable and will no doubt have a profound effect on
us going forward."

I agree but I'd turn that around. Where the comforting security of
village life was a double edged sword, -everyone- knew your business,
little control over privacy. We now have more say over what people
know about us, and control over who is in our own personal community
village.

The profound change as I see it will come in an increase in personal
social capital and a general trend up in collective happiness (which
I understand has been in decline since the 1950's)
More on Social Capital;
http://www.ksg.harvard.edu/saguaro/primer.htm
and I see this book mentioned a lot, haven't read it though:
http://www.bowlingalone.com/

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://gamma.ixda.org/discuss?post=23553

16 Dec 2007 - 10:36am
Dave Malouf
2005

There is something interesting in this ... I mean, not being
interested in sharing your "mundane thoughts" ...

If I think about the people I follow on twitter, they are mostly the
same people I read their blogs of or go to their talks at
conferences. There are a few exceptions, but it seems that most of
the people who tweet away all day long are also the people who blog
daily or at least weekly.

And just like that, I bet most of them(us) have many many more
followers than those that we follow. I find it soooo interesting that
I get follower notices almost daily. It is so rare that I recipricate.

Further, I almost never read the public thread. It is all about the
following and posting to friends and colleagues.

Someone mentioned that they mostly use social networks for business.
This might be a generational thing b/c we learned about social
networks most likely at a time when most of our relationships are
work related and for us in particular most of our work relations are
THAT digitally connected that they would even bother to use such
tools and services.

For people who are younger they are all connected and the line
between connectivity and work and personal is almost blurred into
being indistinguishable. Remember that facebook and myspace were
first tools for young people way before us grand-dadies/mommies
invaded their turf.

To that end, for me it is about blurring my professional more and
more into my personal and as a tool for bringing my personal life
into my professional. The later means that if I have Twitter open at
work and I'm scanning personal friend's tweets I get a new area of
contact with my personal that I wouldn't have had before, namely in
my professional space. The opposite is also true as I tweet as much
about my personal life as I do my professional life, so colleagues
like yourselves learn all about my kid as much as about my class on
IxD.

To my comment about entertainment. I think the main point I was
making there, is about "seriousness". One of the advantages of all
this stuff is that it is about personal choice and personal
expression. Yes, it can lead to better networking capabilities
(LinkedIn and Facebook have been great for that), but they are all
also about letting loose a bit. It is about letting loose the notion
of privacy, creating more of a swiss-cheese effect in the walls that
surround you. Sometimes you might regret a hole or two, but for the
most part it is pretty cool.

-- dave

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=23553

16 Dec 2007 - 10:43am
Katie Ware
2007

If the premise holds true - that this is more of a culture shift in how we communicate, then what the services is somewhat irrelevant. The services will evolve, but is it chicken or egg?

"interesting laboratory to see these shifts." - Yup. I find it fun to just be a part of these social experiments :)

Will the same services hold our attention in the next few years?

rgds,
Dan in Taipei - http://twitter.com/dszuc

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16 Dec 2007 - 10:49am
Mark Schraad
2006

That was me. Back in the late 80's and early 90's, building a cutting
edge design firm in the midwest was a really silly idea. I just
didn't know it. Connection with folks at conferences, and then
following up with conversation on news groups, compuserve and AOL
made all the difference in the world. We figured out how to benefit
from Silicon Valley and New York and Chicago without actually being
there. These days - that's pretty much a given.

These days I live pretty far from my closest friends. But what I have
gain most from these networks recently have been the reconnection
with friends and former employees that I have lost track of. Not to
get to heady... but that socialization through time is something I
would never have anticipates.

Mark

On Dec 16, 2007, at 2:36 AM, dave malouf wrote:

> Someone mentioned that they mostly use social networks for business.
> This might be a generational thing b/c we learned about social
> networks most likely at a time when most of our relationships are
> work related and for us in particular most of our work relations are
> THAT digitally connected that they would even bother to use such
> tools and services.

16 Dec 2007 - 12:32pm
Callie Neylan
2007

Funny, though. I'm the one who was bugging my children to sign up for
Facebook (I got sucked in in grad school), not the other way around.
And I don't think either of them has used Twitter yet, which I use,
but only to follow a handful of people I know in 3D.

I won't do MySpace, though. My design sensibilities simply won't
allow it!

Callie Neylan, MFA | Visual + Interaction Design | NEYLAN DESIGN
COMPANY | T 206 718 9909 | F 206 400 1664 | E hello at callieneylan.com

On Dec 16, 2007, at 7:36 AM, dave malouf wrote:

> For people who are younger they are all connected and the line
> between connectivity and work and personal is almost blurred into
> being indistinguishable. Remember that facebook and myspace were
> first tools for young people way before us grand-dadies/mommies
> invaded their turf.

17 Dec 2007 - 3:25pm
Todd O\'Neill
2007

OK, I'm not alone.

Twitter: I don't get it. Could be my age but I would have to set aside time
to "tweet" and with everything else that I SHOULD set aside time for Twitter
isn't even on the list.

I like Facebook but I limit the time I spend there. I'm too curious about
what everyone is doing and I would just start to wander.

Later!

Todd O'Neill
San Antonio, TX
Doing Media blog
http://www.doingmedia.net
oneill.todd at gmail.com

17 Dec 2007 - 9:26pm
Neil Lee
2007

Le 17-12-07 à 15:25, Todd O'Neill a écrit :

> Twitter: I don't get it. Could be my age but I would have to set
> aside time
> to "tweet" and with everything else that I SHOULD set aside time for
> Twitter
> isn't even on the list.

If you use an application like Twitterific (Mac) or one of the other
many twitter desktop clients[1] it's much easier and faster to post
tweets.

[1]:http://twitter.pbwiki.com/Apps

For me, twitterific sits there running in the background and when I
feel the urge to post to Twitter I just hit a quick key, blab out what
I wanted to say, and hit return. The other huge benefit is that
Twitterific and other desktop clients pull down tweets from people
you're following, so you never have to interact with the web site at
all.

The other way I use Twitter is when I'm out - I send SMS messages to
Twitter with what I'm up to that night if I'm meeting up with friends
later on, or if I'm looking for company to come along for the ride.

The reality is that like any other "social" application you either
find a need it fulfills or a way to integrate it into your life or you
don't. No harm, no foul.

Neil

17 Dec 2007 - 10:07pm
Bill DeRouchey
2010

My angle on Twitter is very similar to the chunk below that I quoted from Dave.

My initial reaction to Twitter was "damn that's narcissistic." But
some people I respected liked it so I tried it. It took a week or so,
but then I got it.

It's not business networking, it's probably social networking, but
that's too dry and clinical of a term. It's people connecting as
people, not as workers or professionals or business contacts, but as
people.

The vast majority of people that I follow are people that I have had a
face-to-face conversation with. I was curious, so I counted. I follow
46 people. I've shared a beer, or had a moment, or talked about UX
stuff with 36 of those. The rest I've had online contact with, or are
people in my city's network, plus a couple of fanboy follows.

But my main point is, I use Twitter to follow people that I like as
people. Many of them/you I've met at conferences, and really enjoyed
the conversations/interactions we've had, but only get to see once
every year or two. Sure, we're in the same industry and career
opportunities may happen, but I'm also interested in the other hours
of the day. It's the old definition of "friends". How are the kids?
What movies have you seen? How was that vacation?

Life really should take priority over work, and Twitter blends the two
in interesting ways. I'll bet that most people who follow each other
met through work somehow, but now they're sharing life.

So when I tweet, I'm sharing moments in my life. When I read, I'm
glimpsing moments in others' lives. So what have I learned? The folks
at Adaptive Path really like each other and hang out beyond work.
Thomas travels a lot, but has had some medical issues in the family
recently. Dave is enthusiastic and doesn't sleep. Brian and Lee tend
to have a sweet outlook on life. Livia loves food but is forgetting
Portuguese. Dan plays cello. In the end, these things stick with me
more than the buzzwords du jour.

So in that spirit, I have to go make some dinner. Farfelle with
parmesan tonight.

See you in Savannah!

Bill

On Sun, 16 Dec 2007 07:36:14, dave malouf <dave at ixda.org> wrote:

> To that end, for me it is about blurring my professional more and
> more into my personal and as a tool for bringing my personal life
> into my professional. The later means that if I have Twitter open at
> work and I'm scanning personal friend's tweets I get a new area of
> contact with my personal that I wouldn't have had before, namely in
> my professional space. The opposite is also true as I tweet as much
> about my personal life as I do my professional life, so colleagues
> like yourselves learn all about my kid as much as about my class on
> IxD.
>
> To my comment about entertainment. I think the main point I was
> making there, is about "seriousness". One of the advantages of all
> this stuff is that it is about personal choice and personal
> expression. Yes, it can lead to better networking capabilities
> (LinkedIn and Facebook have been great for that), but they are all
> also about letting loose a bit. It is about letting loose the notion
> of privacy, creating more of a swiss-cheese effect in the walls that
> surround you. Sometimes you might regret a hole or two, but for the
> most part it is pretty cool.
>
> -- dave

17 Dec 2007 - 10:08pm
Lisa Harper
2007

I have a gchat contact with twitter, so it's always available. I find
I naturally post tweets during those "think aloud" moments when I have
something to say, but no in particular is around to say them to.
What's so fascinating about twitter is that it's a broadcast medium.
With an sms there is some expectation for a response. Not so with a
tweet. It really is something of an sms correlate to a blog post.
What's really more curious is why some people "get" twitter -- and why
some do not. There does seem to be some generational line, but not
entirely.

By the way, you can blog or tweet with http://jott.com. I've come to
rely on Jott for many things. Voice and sms are truly beginning to
push the bubble of interaction design.

Lisa Harper
MITRE

On Dec 17, 2007 3:25 PM, Todd O'Neill <oneill.todd at gmail.com> wrote:
> OK, I'm not alone.
>
> Twitter: I don't get it. Could be my age but I would have to set aside time
> to "tweet" and with everything else that I SHOULD set aside time for Twitter
> isn't even on the list.
>
> I like Facebook but I limit the time I spend there. I'm too curious about
> what everyone is doing and I would just start to wander.
>
> Later!
>
> Todd O'Neill
> San Antonio, TX
> Doing Media blog
> http://www.doingmedia.net
> oneill.todd at gmail.com
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
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> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
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18 Dec 2007 - 12:15pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

> The other way I use Twitter is when I'm out - I send SMS messages to
> Twitter with what I'm up to that night if I'm meeting up with friends
> later on, or if I'm looking for company to come along for the ride.

Twitter is super-easy to deal with through desktop and mobile apps. I use
"Hahlo" (http://hahlo.com/) on my iPhone and simply check it / post to it
whenever I happen to be standing still for five minutes.

It takes no time at all to figure out what to say and then say it, and
though it can take a moment to scan other people's posts, they often include
links to great articles and such you would have ever known about (Jared's
tweets, for example, often link to great stuff).

-r-

18 Dec 2007 - 12:19pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

> It's not business networking, it's probably social networking, but
> that's too dry and clinical of a term. It's people connecting as
> people, not as workers or professionals or business contacts, but as
> people.

Someone should create a Twitter visualization app, where you can visualize
the geo-location of the people you're following. Maybe a mashup using the
Twitter API and Google Maps. Maybe Google Earth! Then you could zoom in on
your friend's exact location, peer into the Starbuck's window, and imagine
your friend drinking a soy latte.

OK, maybe that's going too far.

-r-

18 Dec 2007 - 12:24pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

> By the way, you can blog or tweet with http://jott.com. I've come to
> rely on Jott for many things. Voice and sms are truly beginning to
> push the bubble of interaction design.

Jott is great, especially if you're on the go a lot. It's like having a
digital assistant to write email, blog posts, tweets, etc, for you when
you're not near a computer. Also works for Google Calendar events, I think I
heard recently.

But you do have to talk verrrry slowly and spell out uncommon words to make
sure the translations come out right.

-r-

18 Dec 2007 - 12:41pm
livlab
2003

I didn't want to send a "me too" post but my sentiments towards Twitter
have been better explained by Bill.

Bill DeRouchey wrote:
> But my main point is, I use Twitter to follow people that I like as
> people.

The web has allowed me to maintain friendships from afar that I probably
wouldn't have otherwise - Twitter allows me live those friendships.

> Livia loves food but is forgetting
> Portuguese.

Yes, damn.

http://twitter.com/livlab

24 Dec 2007 - 8:08pm
dszuc
2005

Yup.

Twitter would have been a great tool growing up and filled the gap
just after Summer Camp in Australia where we all wanted to keep in
more contact as we waited another year for Summer Camp to start
again. We used to use the phone more to chat and meeting up at
people's houses for video nights. Do kids today still have video/DVD
nights? ;)

- Dan

Daniel Szuc
Principal Usability Consultant
www.apogeehk.com
T: +852 2581 2166
F: +852 2833 2961
"Usability in Asia"

The Usability Kit - www.theusabilitykit.com

On 18/12/2007, at 11:07 AM, Bill DeRouchey wrote:

> But my main point is, I use Twitter to follow people that I like as
> people. Many of them/you I've met at conferences, and really enjoyed
> the conversations/interactions we've had, but only get to see once
> every year or two.

27 Dec 2007 - 5:18pm
paigesaez
2007

Has anyone looked at Twittervision? It's rather wonderful.
http://twittervision.com/

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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