New pattern library site: ui-patterns.com

28 Jan 2008 - 2:35pm
6 years ago
3 replies
1424 reads
Dave Cortright
2005

Just passing this along for reference. I'm not affiliated with the site, but
I like what I've seen so far–especially the clean, simple design of the site
itself.
http://ui-patterns.com/

FWIW, I saw this referenced from Smashing Magazine, yet another site I'm not
affiliated with but find to be a pretty nice resource.
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/

Comments

28 Jan 2008 - 3:53pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

> Just passing this along for reference. I'm not affiliated with the site,
> but
> I like what I've seen so far–especially the clean, simple design of the
> site
> itself.
> http://ui-patterns.com/

The initiative is great, but there are obviously a few problems.

1) There is no navigation on the site - you always need to return to the
homepage to find new patterns. It's not very scalable.

2) The pattern descriptions could benefit from some more detail. Jared Spool
has a great write-up on the elements of a good pattern description
here<http://www.uie.com/articles/elements_of_a_design_pattern/>.
More thorough descriptions could help convince the interaction design
community to promote it as a good resource.

3) One thing not even Spool mentions is that a pattern description can
always benefit from a summary of possible benefits and caveats in terms of
usability. For example, your description of "Continuous scrolling" could
mention (based on usability studies, of course) that this pattern can cause
confusion for users, who often believe that a page with continuous scrolling
simply has not finished loading. As in, they often don't recognize that the
scrolling is done that way on purpose—they think the page hasn't completed
loading. As such, they keep clicking on the down arrow of the scrollbar in a
repeatedly failing attempt to "reach the end". Some discussion of the
usability of each pattern would be incredibly beneficial to anyone
considering the use of a given pattern.

4) Some of the patterns are more commonly known by other names, and these
names should be mentioned for the sake of completeness. "Continuous
scrolling", for example, is often known as "Infinite scrolling", and "Tip a
friend" is often known as "Tell a friend".

5) I noticed there is no way to contact the guy who created the site (unless
you go through his blog to his personal About page and copy/paste/modify his
email address). I wonder if he has plans to open up the site so that others
can contribute (wiki-style), or at least to offer a feedback form for each
pattern description.

(FWIW, I emailed this list to the guy who created the site.)

-r-

28 Jan 2008 - 4:37pm
Ari
2006

minor issues aside, this is a very nice resource and kudos to the site's
author for developing it!
On 1/28/08, Robert Hoekman, Jr. <robert at rhjr.net> wrote:
>
> > Just passing this along for reference. I'm not affiliated with the site,
> > but
> > I like what I've seen so far–especially the clean, simple design of the
> > site
> > itself.
> > http://ui-patterns.com/
>
>
> The initiative is great, but there are obviously a few problems.
>
> 1) There is no navigation on the site - you always need to return to the
> homepage to find new patterns. It's not very scalable.
>
> 2) The pattern descriptions could benefit from some more detail. Jared
> Spool
> has a great write-up on the elements of a good pattern description
> here<http://www.uie.com/articles/elements_of_a_design_pattern/>.
> More thorough descriptions could help convince the interaction design
> community to promote it as a good resource.
>
> 3) One thing not even Spool mentions is that a pattern description can
> always benefit from a summary of possible benefits and caveats in terms of
> usability. For example, your description of "Continuous scrolling" could
> mention (based on usability studies, of course) that this pattern can
> cause
> confusion for users, who often believe that a page with continuous
> scrolling
> simply has not finished loading. As in, they often don't recognize that
> the
> scrolling is done that way on purpose—they think the page hasn't completed
> loading. As such, they keep clicking on the down arrow of the scrollbar in
> a
> repeatedly failing attempt to "reach the end". Some discussion of the
> usability of each pattern would be incredibly beneficial to anyone
> considering the use of a given pattern.
>
> 4) Some of the patterns are more commonly known by other names, and these
> names should be mentioned for the sake of completeness. "Continuous
> scrolling", for example, is often known as "Infinite scrolling", and "Tip
> a
> friend" is often known as "Tell a friend".
>
> 5) I noticed there is no way to contact the guy who created the site
> (unless
> you go through his blog to his personal About page and copy/paste/modify
> his
> email address). I wonder if he has plans to open up the site so that
> others
> can contribute (wiki-style), or at least to offer a feedback form for each
> pattern description.
>
> (FWIW, I emailed this list to the guy who created the site.)
>
> -r-
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28 Jan 2008 - 5:29pm
Christian Crumlish
2006

Agreed. Alex (I think is his name), contacted me, as he's clearly labeled
some of his format and display on the YPL. I admire his energy and
initiative (and somewhat envy his freedom to simply dash off a pattern and
publish it without the imprimatur of a review committee).
I do think it's instructive to compare his carousel pattern with the one in
the Yahoo library to get a sense of the different approaches.

-x-

On Jan 28, 2008 2:37 PM, Ari Feldman <ari1970 at gmail.com> wrote:

> minor issues aside, this is a very nice resource and kudos to the site's
> author for developing it!

--
Christian Crumlish http://xianlandia.com
Yahoo! pattern detective http://developer.yahoo.com/ypatterns
IA Institute director of technology http://iainstitute.org

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