Creative Navigation

22 Feb 2008 - 10:06am
6 years ago
10 replies
696 reads
russwilson
2005

I'm not trying to drive people to my blog (I have enough traffic now), but I
posted
a very short entry highlighting what I feel is a very creative navigation
method.

http://www.dexodesign.com/2008/02/creative-navigation.html

I would love to get IxDA'ers opinions because many of my readers do not
agree
with my assessment... (but I feel they are missing my point).

If you are interested, please take a look - navigation is one of my key
interests,
and I highly value the opinions of the people on this list.

Thanks,
Russ
blog: http://www.dexodesign.com/blog.html

Comments

22 Feb 2008 - 11:48am
Charlie Kreitzberg
2008

I thought it was a really nice site and I like the design. I can see that
there might be come confusions about the fact that the orange arrow leads to
the menu. Perhaps it should have a word like "menu" on it or something to
make it clear that it is clickable.

The visual design is really nice (as is the visual design of your blog) and
it is nice that the menu goes away and does not clutter the screen when it
is not needed.

I think the reader who gave the design a solid "C" is being rather harsh.

Best,

Charlie (snowed-in in Princeton, NJ)

22 Feb 2008 - 11:56am
SemanticWill
2007

It was attractive, but the orange arrow definitely some Fitt's issues. The
arrow is decent size - but if you didn't tell me - I would have had no idea
that that launched navigation. It's not that the site content on the main
page is so busy with imagery and content that there is even a need to hide
the navigation. It's just sitting on top a static image - so it's not like
it's distracting from a fantastic animated experience of Linsey Lohan nude,
or Britney doing the perp walk - so why hide the nav bar?

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 12:48 PM, Charles B. Kreitzberg <
charlie at cognetics.com> wrote:

> I thought it was a really nice site and I like the design. I can see that
> there might be come confusions about the fact that the orange arrow leads
> to
> the menu. Perhaps it should have a word like "menu" on it or something to
> make it clear that it is clickable.
>
> The visual design is really nice (as is the visual design of your blog)
> and
> it is nice that the menu goes away and does not clutter the screen when it
> is not needed.
>
> I think the reader who gave the design a solid "C" is being rather harsh.
>
> Best,
>
> Charlie (snowed-in in Princeton, NJ)
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
~ will

"No matter how beautiful,
no matter how cool your interface,
it would be better if there were less of it."
Alan Cooper
-
"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"
-------------------------------------------------------
will evans
user experience architect
wkevans4 at gmail.com
-------------------------------------------------------

22 Feb 2008 - 12:04pm
Scott McDaniel
2007

I think it gets some benefit of the doubt as an entertainment site as well.

Scott

--
'Life' plus 'significance' = magic. ~ Grant Morrison

22 Feb 2008 - 12:06pm
White, Jeff
2007

That specific implementation aside, I like the idea of 'collapsed
navigation' in certain situations. As Will implies - there are certain times
when navigation could be less important than other content on the screen.

For public websites, it seems a little risky. But for complex apps that
serve a niche user base and are used frequently, I like the concept of "get
stuff out of my way and let me do my job". They'd quickly learn how the
navigation works.

Jeff

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 12:56 PM, W Evans <wkevans4 at gmail.com> wrote:

> It was attractive, but the orange arrow definitely some Fitt's issues. The
> arrow is decent size - but if you didn't tell me - I would have had no
> idea
> that that launched navigation. It's not that the site content on the main
> page is so busy with imagery and content that there is even a need to hide
> the navigation. It's just sitting on top a static image - so it's not like
> it's distracting from a fantastic animated experience of Linsey Lohan
> nude,
> or Britney doing the perp walk - so why hide the nav bar?
>
> On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 12:48 PM, Charles B. Kreitzberg <
> charlie at cognetics.com> wrote:
>
> > I thought it was a really nice site and I like the design. I can see
> that
> > there might be come confusions about the fact that the orange arrow
> leads
> > to
> > the menu. Perhaps it should have a word like "menu" on it or something
> to
> > make it clear that it is clickable.
> >
> > The visual design is really nice (as is the visual design of your blog)
> > and
> > it is nice that the menu goes away and does not clutter the screen when
> it
> > is not needed.
> >
> > I think the reader who gave the design a solid "C" is being rather
> harsh.
> >
> > Best,
> >
> > Charlie (snowed-in in Princeton, NJ)
> >
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> >
>
>
>
> --
> ~ will
>
> "No matter how beautiful,
> no matter how cool your interface,
> it would be better if there were less of it."
> Alan Cooper
> -
> "Where you innovate, how you innovate,
> and what you innovate are design problems"
> -------------------------------------------------------
> will evans
> user experience architect
> wkevans4 at gmail.com
> -------------------------------------------------------
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

22 Feb 2008 - 12:17pm
SemanticWill
2007

Scott's right - if it's intended audience is younger (than me),
entertainment site, and they added some beefed up flash on the home - like
concert footage or something - plus Britney doing a perp walk - it's pretty
cool :-)

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 1:06 PM, Jeff White <jwhite31 at gmail.com> wrote:

> That specific implementation aside, I like the idea of 'collapsed
> navigation' in certain situations. As Will implies - there are certain times
> when navigation could be less important than other content on the screen.
>
> For public websites, it seems a little risky. But for complex apps that
> serve a niche user base and are used frequently, I like the concept of "get
> stuff out of my way and let me do my job". They'd quickly learn how the
> navigation works.
>
> Jeff
>
>
> On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 12:56 PM, W Evans <wkevans4 at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > It was attractive, but the orange arrow definitely some Fitt's issues.
> > The
> > arrow is decent size - but if you didn't tell me - I would have had no
> > idea
> > that that launched navigation. It's not that the site content on the
> > main
> > page is so busy with imagery and content that there is even a need to
> > hide
> > the navigation. It's just sitting on top a static image - so it's not
> > like
> > it's distracting from a fantastic animated experience of Linsey Lohan
> > nude,
> > or Britney doing the perp walk - so why hide the nav bar?
> >
> > On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 12:48 PM, Charles B. Kreitzberg <
> > charlie at cognetics.com> wrote:
> >
> > > I thought it was a really nice site and I like the design. I can see
> > that
> > > there might be come confusions about the fact that the orange arrow
> > leads
> > > to
> > > the menu. Perhaps it should have a word like "menu" on it or something
> > to
> > > make it clear that it is clickable.
> > >
> > > The visual design is really nice (as is the visual design of your
> > blog)
> > > and
> > > it is nice that the menu goes away and does not clutter the screen
> > when it
> > > is not needed.
> > >
> > > I think the reader who gave the design a solid "C" is being rather
> > harsh.
> > >
> > > Best,
> > >
> > > Charlie (snowed-in in Princeton, NJ)
> > >
> > > ________________________________________________________________
> > > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > ~ will
> >
> > "No matter how beautiful,
> > no matter how cool your interface,
> > it would be better if there were less of it."
> > Alan Cooper
> > -
> > "Where you innovate, how you innovate,
> > and what you innovate are design problems"
> > -------------------------------------------------------
> > will evans
> > user experience architect
> > wkevans4 at gmail.com
> > -------------------------------------------------------
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> >
>
>

--
~ will

"No matter how beautiful,
no matter how cool your interface,
it would be better if there were less of it."
Alan Cooper
-
"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"
-------------------------------------------------------
will evans
user experience architect
wkevans4 at gmail.com
-------------------------------------------------------

22 Feb 2008 - 12:24pm
James Leslie
2007

"I think the reader who gave the design a solid "C" is being rather harsh."

I'm primarily a front end developer, so I look at things like making sites inaccessible as a bad thing. This site is inaccessible, when it doesn't need to be... At least the lo-fi version of the site could (or should) have accessible navigation so that people can use it.
This isn't just an issue for people who use assistive technology - it would be inaccessible on a mobile phone (barring iPhone's touch screen) for the same reason.
I think it is a bit naïve of the coders to have not taken this into account, in both coding and UI terms.

I actually quite like the look and style navigation overall, btw :)

22 Feb 2008 - 1:56pm
Jeff Seager
2007

What's interesting to me is the diversity of opinions expressed about
the navigation technique, Russ. Clearly, very few people understand
the principles of (or need for) accessibility in web design.

I agree with the points made by Ian, the guy who gave it a "C," but
I give it a "D" for the same reasons James Leslie explained above.
If you hover over the triangle in the "low bandwidth" version
_first_, then you can "tab" through the navigation functionally.
But if you think some people are confused about how to find the nav
while _looking_ at the page, try adding vision impairment into the
equation.

The concept is cool (which I think was Kelsea's point in directing
you to it in the first place), but it can be done just as well with
CSS and a bit of javascript using an unordered list that degrades
gracefully. That would rate an "A" from me for both design and
function.

In fact, it looks to me as if the chief argument for using Flash on
that site was that the developer had Flash and took the easy way out.
To one whose only tool is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=26313

22 Feb 2008 - 2:10pm
Barbara Ballard
2005

I intuitively jumped to the area to the right of the triangle, not the
triangle itself. Was there anything else to do on the page? No idea.

But, to your original question, check out http://www.etsy.com and the
different "ways to shop". We've been using many of these as
inspiration recently, with an eye towards figuring out how to mobilize
some of it. (ours won't look anything like theirs)

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 10:06 AM, Russell Wilson <russ.wilson at gmail.com> wrote:
> I'm not trying to drive people to my blog (I have enough traffic now), but I
> posted
> a very short entry highlighting what I feel is a very creative navigation
> method.
>
> http://www.dexodesign.com/2008/02/creative-navigation.html
>

--
Barbara Ballard
barbara at littlespringsdesign.com 1-785-838-3003

22 Feb 2008 - 2:18pm
White, Jeff
2007

On Fri, 22 Feb 2008 11:56:50, Jeff Seager <abrojos at hotmail.com> wrote:

> Clearly, very few people understand
> the principles of (or need for) accessibility in web design.
>

But sometimes it's not needed - like enterprise web apps that live in a very
controlled environment. This is the context in which I work. Everything is
in a browser, but browser compatibility and accessibility just don't matter.

I think Russ was trying to explore the concept itself - navigation thats not
always there, but can be accessed when you need it. Not the pros and cons of
that specific implementation.

Jeff

22 Feb 2008 - 12:44pm
Nikki Roberg
2008

Russell,

I understand what your point is and do agree with you that it's a
different approach to navigation design. I too didn't have an issue
figuring out that hovering over or clicking on the orange triangle
would do *something*--I wasn't sure what but that doesn't bother me
on an entertainment site.

On sites such as these I think we need to consider that the Maroon 5
fan is looking for a unique EXPERIENCE. There are things about the
Green Day website (http://www.greenday.com/greenday.html) that are
similarly "unusable"%u2014the positioning on the navigation shifts
from section to section%u2014but I enjoyed the graphic experience and
taking my time to explore. It's not like I'm in desperate need to
find bio information about the band and, "OMG, I can't find it!
I'll never come back to this site again!" On the other hand, if an
e-commerce site tried something like this I would be confused/annoyed
that the navigation was concealed (Maroon 5) or always shifting
(Green Day).

>From an IA and usability standpoint, I have issues with both sites
but I know that you are isolating this to a creative
navigation/experience/visual design conversation. So, I'll
compartmentalize. :)

Cheers,
Nikki Roberg
Information Architect

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=26313

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