Interaction design and tissues

21 Mar 2008 - 10:44am
6 years ago
5 replies
380 reads
sdboyd
2007

I encountered this interaction design a few minutes ago and it moved me
to post :)

I've been sick all week with a sinus infection and have gone through
several boxes of tissues at home and work. Our brand of choice for the
home is Kleenex. No affiliation, just personal preferance. At work they
provide Angel Soft. A few minutes ago I grabbed for a tissue and noticed
that the one that popped up after was a different color. Not
significantly different, just not white.

After some investigation of the box I realized that a) the rest of the
tissues in the box were this same different color and b) there were only
about 10 tissues left.

I'd like to believe that the Angel Soft people did this on purpose as an
indicator to let me know the box was close to empty. If you've got a
free-standing box you can usually tell when it's getting close to empty
b/c it will lift off the table when you pull a tissue. But if your box
is in some sort of decorative holder it's often impossible to tell when
you're running out. The Kleenexes we use at home offer no indicator.

So here's to you, Mr. Tissue Box Interaction Designer, for not giving up
on your dream of making that little square box a bit more useful.

Happy Friday,

Steven Boyd
//AmeriCredit ITS
817-525-7563
steve.boyd at americredit.com

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Comments

21 Mar 2008 - 2:46pm
M S
2006

Excellent example, thank you :)

Another thing I recently read about is that Russian soldiers back in
Afganistan started to put tracer bullet closer to the bottom of their
magazines. In this case they know when magazine is going to be empty soon
(there is visual difference in shooting with regular and tracer ammo).

Most likely other soldiers do it as well, but that's example I know about.
--
Maxim

21 Mar 2008 - 3:45pm
Kevin Fox
2005

The tracer bullet example is a bit scary. One disadvantage of tracer bullets
is that they tend to give away your position (since enemies can see the
tracers as well as you can, and can visually trace them back to their
source). So now not only are you giving away your position, but you're doing
it just before you're going to have to reload!

On Fri, Mar 21, 2008 at 12:46 PM, Maxim Soloviev <maxim at deast.info> wrote:

> Excellent example, thank you :)
>
> Another thing I recently read about is that Russian soldiers back in
> Afganistan started to put tracer bullet closer to the bottom of their
> magazines. In this case they know when magazine is going to be empty soon
> (there is visual difference in shooting with regular and tracer ammo).
>
> Most likely other soldiers do it as well, but that's example I know about.
> --
> Maxim
> ________________________________________________________________
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23 Mar 2008 - 5:40am
Alexander Baxevanis
2007

I guess a less dramatic example comes from the design of paper rolls
for receipt/barcode printers etc. In the last meter or so of the roll,
there is a red line printed on one side of the paper, to alert the
printer users that paper is running out and that they should probably
find a convenient moment to change it.

On Fri, Mar 21, 2008 at 8:45 PM, Kevin Fox <kevin at fury.com> wrote:
> The tracer bullet example is a bit scary. One disadvantage of tracer bullets
> is that they tend to give away your position (since enemies can see the
> tracers as well as you can, and can visually trace them back to their
> source). So now not only are you giving away your position, but you're doing
> it just before you're going to have to reload!
>
>
>
>
> On Fri, Mar 21, 2008 at 12:46 PM, Maxim Soloviev <maxim at deast.info> wrote:
>
> > Excellent example, thank you :)
> >
> > Another thing I recently read about is that Russian soldiers back in
> > Afganistan started to put tracer bullet closer to the bottom of their
> > magazines. In this case they know when magazine is going to be empty soon
> > (there is visual difference in shooting with regular and tracer ammo).
> >
> > Most likely other soldiers do it as well, but that's example I know about.
> > --
> > Maxim
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> >
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

24 Mar 2008 - 7:42am
Benjamin Ho
2007

On a more simple matter, I really like the gas light on my car. ;)

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=27453

24 Mar 2008 - 6:56pm
Mila Songer
2007

Good observation (about the kleenex (yes, the bullets are scary!)). I
often wanted that kind of kleenex "UI" at home but only noticed it
at hotels before. I was guessing that hotel housekeeping staff needed
that visual cue since they weren't the users of the kleenex. At home
I'm both the buyer and user and I would still really appreciate a
hint like that.

So the original post is interesting both as a design topic and as
reminder to consider all the stakeholders involved in various aspects
of design implementations.

And IxDA is now even helping with my grocery list ;-) THANK YOU!!

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=27453

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