Interaction Design in an Agile Environment

17 Apr 2008 - 7:09pm
6 years ago
16 replies
3788 reads
Loredana
2008

What are your thoughts on Interaction Design and the Agile Environment?

Here’s my experience of how extreme programming and design mix:

1) Product requirements are one thing today, another tomorrow, based
mainly on strategic (not user) feedback
2) Weekly iteration cycles allow 4-5 days for research, prototyping
and documentation of design
3) Little time is left for contextual inquiries - the product becomes
the "company’s" vision rather than the consumer’s asked-for solution
4) “Featuritis” is a full-blown epidemic
5) Redesign of the entire system is needed every time a new feature
changes how the ones already in place interact

What are your thoughts on how a "start-up interaction designer" can...

1) Keep ahead of developers and still design useful interactions
2) Build flexibility in their design in order to prevent constant
redesigning when new features are introduced
3) Keep an open dialog with users in the most time and budget-
efficient way

It sounds like a tall order, but as I was reading through the
different postings it became clear to me that if there is an answer
out there ... you guys have it! :)

Thanks,

Loredana

Comments

18 Apr 2008 - 2:49pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

>
> What are your thoughts on Interaction Design and the Agile Environment?
>

There's a Google Group focused on this exact subject, but a word of
warning—many of the list members are die-hard Agile purists, and offer very
little flexibility in adapted or "skewed" definitions of
Agile-with-a-capital-A.

-r-

18 Apr 2008 - 4:52pm
leneleth
2008

I have used weekly user testings in an agile development environment. It
helped me, project managers and developers to keep focus on the users.

I had two kinds of prototypes for testing:
The prototypes also used to communicate with developers and project
managers.
And prototypes being very true to the users needs.
Testing the first type with users worked as a sanity check before
production, easy fixes could be made.
The second type of prototypes worked to explore new ideas, that later on
could be integrated in the first type of prototypes.
The first type was kind of owned by the agile focused developers and project
managers.
The second type was owned by me and the users.

The first type was good for quick and dynamic development, and the second
type would take care of solving all the problems the agile method would
create for usability.
Having strong findings in the second type, I found it not too hard to
convince developers and project managers to integrate the findings in the
first prototype, and in the agile development.

It was a way to feed usability continously into the dominant agile process.

/Lene

> What are your thoughts on Interaction Design and the Agile Environment?
>
>

19 Apr 2008 - 9:37am
Bruno Figueiredo
2007

I have worked recently on a project that used the Scrum methodology
applied to UX, and it didn't work quite well. I think that the
reasons behind it was that the backlog wasn't properly laid out. I
would also advise you not to mix early stages of UX development with
implementation as it will really mess things up.

A pretty good Agile "Scrum" method diagram can be found here:
http://www.softhouse.se/Uploades/scrum-diagram.gif

All in all I learned a few "Agile" valuable lessons:
- Doing a backlog with chunks of work (achievable in "sprints" of 1
or 2 weeks) is a really great way of thinking ahead of what you can do
and how long it will take you.
- Daily "scrum meetings" are a really good way to give you focus
for the day ahead while at the same time giving you some insight on
what other team members are doing and how you can work with them.
- Pushing deliverables out at the end of the sprint is a good way to
force you to have something "real" at the end of it.

Alas, no development methodology is perfect, but if you embrace it
properly it helps out a lot.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=28227

19 Apr 2008 - 3:41pm
Sean P. Goggins
2008

I think the conflict between design and agile development methods is best
understood by reflecting on the values conflict between the two
disciplines.

Here's a full list of the principles of agile development:

http://agilemanifesto.org/principles.html

These principles are ones I think designers and developers/technolgists will
agree on in most cases:
Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount
of work not done--is essential.

Welcome changing requirements, even late in
development. Agile processes harness change for
the customer's competitive advantage.

These two fight design values the most:
Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer
through early and continuous delivery
of valuable software.

Working software is the primary measure of progress.

This one has some risk because technology is "excellent", but design is
merely "Good"...
Continuous attention to technical excellence
and good design enhances agility.

Ten years ago software development was in a crisis. Agile methods have made
a significant, positive impact on software development quality and
productivity. As somebody with a software development background who is
currently working both sides in the development of social software systems
in a research environment, I found this question interesting, and I hope the
response is helpful.

--
Sean P. Goggins
http://www.goggins.com

''Design is what you do when you don't [yet] know what you are doing.''
-- George Stiny, Professor of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of
Technology,

"The game is a lot better because he played it, and I think that's the
criteria that matters most."
--Mike Ditka on Brett Favre

http://www.wisconsinidea.wisc.edu/history.html

21 Apr 2008 - 7:59am
stauciuc
2006

Hi Loredana,

You can also check the previous threads for more of people's thoughts, as
there have been many interesting discussions on this subject:
http://ixda.org/search.php?tag=agile

Sebi

On Fri, Apr 18, 2008 at 3:09 AM, Loredana Crisan <loredana at lexy.com> wrote:

> What are your thoughts on Interaction Design and the Agile Environment?
>
> Here's my experience of how extreme programming and design mix:
>
> 1) Product requirements are one thing today, another tomorrow, based
> mainly on strategic (not user) feedback
> 2) Weekly iteration cycles allow 4-5 days for research, prototyping
> and documentation of design
> 3) Little time is left for contextual inquiries - the product becomes
> the "company's" vision rather than the consumer's asked-for solution
> 4) "Featuritis" is a full-blown epidemic
> 5) Redesign of the entire system is needed every time a new feature
> changes how the ones already in place interact
>
>
> What are your thoughts on how a "start-up interaction designer" can...
>
> 1) Keep ahead of developers and still design useful interactions
> 2) Build flexibility in their design in order to prevent constant
> redesigning when new features are introduced
> 3) Keep an open dialog with users in the most time and budget-
> efficient way
>
> It sounds like a tall order, but as I was reading through the
> different postings it became clear to me that if there is an answer
> out there ... you guys have it! :)
>
> Thanks,
>
> Loredana
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
Sergiu Sebastian Tauciuc
http://www.sergiutauciuc.ro/en/

21 Apr 2008 - 9:53am
jrrogan
2005

I've worked as the UX application design lead within Agile processes for 9
or so years. I've experienced a few key initiatives which increase Design
success with Agile, and which make projects more successful in general.

Key Initiatives for Design success with Agile process:

1. Be flexible with the "Agile Methodology" – use aspects that work,
deprecate those that don't. Dogmatic process adherence can kill a project.

2. Keep design artifacts one iteration ahead of engineering – Design doesn't
have to be waterfall, rather design has laid out a roadmap with architecture
and business, and these deliverables are consumed, negotiated and enhanced
with engineering.

3. Design Strategic Interface/Interaction "Scaffolding" upfront/ in first
iteration – (This assumes the organization has Strategic vision, if not,
good luck and cash your checks quick ;). Strategic vision into the business
domain and objectives are the design drivers. With this information design
can build interface "Scaffolding" to be reused and adapted to multiple
situations, (see "pattern libraries"). Note these interface patterns can
include deep domain specific interactions, which become component building
blocks. Interface scaffolding components should be "minimum viable" in
functionality and design, this will aide in all aspects of usability, design
and development, including consistency, ease of testing and training.

Has anyone else had success with these initiatives or others within an Agile
process?

On 4/19/08, Sean Goggins <outdoors at acm.org> wrote:
>
> I think the conflict between design and agile development methods is best
> understood by reflecting on the values conflict between the two
> disciplines.
>
> Here's a full list of the principles of agile development:
>
> http://agilemanifesto.org/principles.html
>
> These principles are ones I think designers and developers/technolgists
> will
> agree on in most cases:
> Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount
> of work not done--is essential.
>
> Welcome changing requirements, even late in
> development. Agile processes harness change for
> the customer's competitive advantage.
>
> These two fight design values the most:
> Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer
> through early and continuous delivery
> of valuable software.
>
> Working software is the primary measure of progress.
>
>
> This one has some risk because technology is "excellent", but design is
> merely "Good"...
> Continuous attention to technical excellence
> and good design enhances agility.
>
> Ten years ago software development was in a crisis. Agile methods have
> made
> a significant, positive impact on software development quality and
> productivity. As somebody with a software development background who is
> currently working both sides in the development of social software systems
> in a research environment, I found this question interesting, and I hope
> the
> response is helpful.
>
>
> --
> Sean P. Goggins
> http://www.goggins.com
>
> ''Design is what you do when you don't [yet] know what you are doing.''
> -- George Stiny, Professor of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of
> Technology,
>
> "The game is a lot better because he played it, and I think that's the
> criteria that matters most."
> --Mike Ditka on Brett Favre
>
> http://www.wisconsinidea.wisc.edu/history.html
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
Joseph Rich Rogan
President UX/UI Inc.
http://www.jrrogan.com

20 Apr 2008 - 6:03pm
jcgrosjean
2008

Hi,
Agile development offers new and interesting perspectives for interaction
designers and usability specialists(and great benefits : something to test
about every 4 weeks, continuous user feedback, focus on quality and
simplicity, lightweight but accurate format of "user stories", ...).
But they also require that we adapt the way we (interaction designers and
usability specialists) intervene, our tools and techniques, in order to be
more efficient and more reactive in such specific environment(short
iterations; incremental development, high velocity ...).

I think interaction designers have first to fully and clearly
understand the most important agile methods (SCRUM, XP) and the principles
/ values of the agile Manifesto. This is a good and mandatory starting
point !
We also have to work within the team in the same work
environment, and always have to be ready with our stuff the D day
(timeboxing, an agile essential principle, is sometimes hard to respect).
The feedback we provide to the team must be quick, efficient and usable.

In terms of deliverables and studies, we should also produce only what is
"just
enough" and during the first iterations leave the the "Big design Up
Front" philosophy. Studies must be short (to take place in the very first
iterations) or accomplished before the sprint 0 (off project). Usability
testing sessions must be more reactive, more accurate: the scope shorter,
well defined and evolutive (iterations afer iterations in terms of
participants profile, testing format, testing content and scenarios ...).

Agile teams need us; they start to understand their weak points. Some of
our tools and techniques, like personas, prototyping, requirements and
design workshops facilitation, usability testing ... are so useful for
them and they know it.

For people ineresting and ready to read "french", I wrote on my blog an
article called "Manifeste pour une ergonomie Agile" (An Agile Usability
Manifesto) where I described our new challenges and the key points of our
interventions in Scrum, Xp or Up contexts. The link:
http://www.qualitystreet.fr/?2007/09/30/61-manifeste-pour-une-ergonomie-agile

Regards,
Jean Claude Grosjean
Jc-Qualitystreet
www.qualitystreet.fr

Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

21 Apr 2008 - 1:21pm
Anonymous

The Journal of Usability Studies had a great article on integrating
Agile/UCD, written by Desiree Sy last year:
http://www.upassoc.org/upa_publications/jus/2007may/agile-ucd.html

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=28227

21 Apr 2008 - 3:51pm
jrrogan
2005

Hi Laura,

Regarding your last point, we're working with "Feature Driven Design" (FDD)
methodologies, (along with 3 or 4 other cobbled together methodologies ;).
FDD process embeds users/clients/engineers/QA/BA's (and a bunch of other
acronyms whom I'm not sure what they do), together in most design meetings.

Although FDD can be cumbersome (with everybody involved at every juncture),
I'd totally agree that getting all feedback early and often helps design
immensely.

Rich

On 4/21/08, Laura Francis <laura.k.francis at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Hi Rich
>
> ...The other thing I think is really valuable is getting a team
> together and involving the clients/users/devs/designers right from the
> start.
>
> Laura Francis
>

--
Joseph Rich Rogan
President UX/UI Inc.
http://www.jrrogan.com

21 Apr 2008 - 3:05pm
Laura Francis
2008

Hi Rich

I totally agree with all the points you made, in my experience working
with UX/UCD and Agile things like making the methodology 'your'
methodology, as in whatever works for your organisation is fundamental
to success. Working one sprint/iteration ahead is a really good idea,
we always start with a planning sprint anyway, its not whats
recommended in any methodology but, it has always worked for me. It
also allows you to allocate resources and plan some time in for
planning. The other thing I think is really valuable is getting a team
together and involving the clients/users/devs/designers right from the
start.

Laura Francis

26 Apr 2008 - 8:22pm
Bipul Keshri
2007

Well said Rich. I have been on Agile based projects for about 3 years now.
My thoughts on how a "start-up interaction designer" can use Agile to
his/her advantage:

1. Read about Agile and interpret it as a user centered design methodology.

2. Meet your client. Understand what they want to build, why do they want to
build it and for whom. Get the "big picture". This is when you build the
first cut of the site-map.

3. Meet the users. Understand goals, drivers, ... . Build the persona and
scenarios. these persona will help you immensely throughout the project.

4. Meet technologists. What they been doing all this time ? Educate them on
your "UCD interpretation" of the agile process and your findings.
Now this is the tricky part. Typically, I have got staffed on the project
before the developers and got the time (around 2-4 weeks to do the above).
Otherwise, you will find them working on "spike solutions". That again gives
you the time to work in parallel. Find out the technology limitations. That
will help you design solutions that are easily implementable and you can get
it done with least resistance. Well, mostly.

5. Meet you project manager. He will be almost ready with a list of "user
stories". Sync up your site-map and scenarios.

6. Go back to your client. Share your findings (vision, user needs,
technology) and "help" them prioritize features/stories. Split the list of
stories (backlog) into iterations.

7. Go back to you drawing board. Design for as many iterations as you can
and define the patterns. You need to be ahead by as many iterations as you
can. If possible design the whole thing even before development begins. You
can always make changes as the product evolves. Test with your users using
paper prototypes.

8. Let the development begin ...

9. Use every iteration (release) for usability testing and gather user
feedback. Create additional stories (new/enhancement) and have
them prioritized.

That should set you up for success.

All the best,
--
Bipul Keshri
Senior Information Architect
Sapient Corporation

On Mon, Apr 21, 2008 at 8:23 PM, Rich Rogan <jrrogan at gmail.com> wrote:

> I've worked as the UX application design lead within Agile processes for 9
> or so years. I've experienced a few key initiatives which increase Design
> success with Agile, and which make projects more successful in general.
>
> Key Initiatives for Design success with Agile process:
>
> 1. Be flexible with the "Agile Methodology" – use aspects that work,
> deprecate those that don't. Dogmatic process adherence can kill a project.
>
> 2. Keep design artifacts one iteration ahead of engineering – Design
> doesn't
> have to be waterfall, rather design has laid out a roadmap with
> architecture
> and business, and these deliverables are consumed, negotiated and enhanced
> with engineering.
>
> 3. Design Strategic Interface/Interaction "Scaffolding" upfront/ in first
> iteration – (This assumes the organization has Strategic vision, if not,
> good luck and cash your checks quick ;). Strategic vision into the
> business
> domain and objectives are the design drivers. With this information design
> can build interface "Scaffolding" to be reused and adapted to multiple
> situations, (see "pattern libraries"). Note these interface patterns can
> include deep domain specific interactions, which become component building
> blocks. Interface scaffolding components should be "minimum viable" in
> functionality and design, this will aide in all aspects of usability,
> design
> and development, including consistency, ease of testing and training.
>
> Has anyone else had success with these initiatives or others within an
> Agile
> process?
>
>
> On 4/19/08, Sean Goggins <outdoors at acm.org> wrote:
> >
> > I think the conflict between design and agile development methods is
> best
> > understood by reflecting on the values conflict between the two
> > disciplines.
> >
> > Here's a full list of the principles of agile development:
> >
> > http://agilemanifesto.org/principles.html
> >
> > These principles are ones I think designers and developers/technolgists
> > will
> > agree on in most cases:
> > Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount
> > of work not done--is essential.
> >
> > Welcome changing requirements, even late in
> > development. Agile processes harness change for
> > the customer's competitive advantage.
> >
> > These two fight design values the most:
> > Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer
> > through early and continuous delivery
> > of valuable software.
> >
> > Working software is the primary measure of progress.
> >
> >
> > This one has some risk because technology is "excellent", but design is
> > merely "Good"...
> > Continuous attention to technical excellence
> > and good design enhances agility.
> >
> > Ten years ago software development was in a crisis. Agile methods have
> > made
> > a significant, positive impact on software development quality and
> > productivity. As somebody with a software development background who is
> > currently working both sides in the development of social software
> systems
> > in a research environment, I found this question interesting, and I hope
> > the
> > response is helpful.
> >
> >
> > --
> > Sean P. Goggins
> > http://www.goggins.com
> >
> > ''Design is what you do when you don't [yet] know what you are doing.''
> > -- George Stiny, Professor of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of
> > Technology,
> >
> > "The game is a lot better because he played it, and I think that's the
> > criteria that matters most."
> > --Mike Ditka on Brett Favre
> >
> > http://www.wisconsinidea.wisc.edu/history.html
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Joseph Rich Rogan
> President UX/UI Inc.
> http://www.jrrogan.com
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

28 Apr 2008 - 3:50am
Laura Francis
2008

Reading this thread on this list has made me really happy! For a while
there I was thinking that I was the only person doing things this way,
and therefore it was either wrong, or totally radical! I am glad to
see its neither :)

I still don't think there are many people in the UK working like this.
I'm fairly new to this list, but what I am really interested in is
finding out where I can meet other people who are working this way
because I think talking face to face and sharing experiences and ideas
would be really valuable.

I've avidly read the responses so far and will continue to do so.

thanks

Laura

On Sun, Apr 27, 2008 at 2:22 AM, Bipul Keshri <bipulkeshri at gmail.com> wrote:
> Well said Rich. I have been on Agile based projects for about 3 years now.
> My thoughts on how a "start-up interaction designer" can use Agile to
> his/her advantage:
>
> 1. Read about Agile and interpret it as a user centered design methodology.
>
> 2. Meet your client. Understand what they want to build, why do they want to
> build it and for whom. Get the "big picture". This is when you build the
> first cut of the site-map.
>
> 3. Meet the users. Understand goals, drivers, ... . Build the persona and
> scenarios. these persona will help you immensely throughout the project.
>
> 4. Meet technologists. What they been doing all this time ? Educate them on
> your "UCD interpretation" of the agile process and your findings.
> Now this is the tricky part. Typically, I have got staffed on the project
> before the developers and got the time (around 2-4 weeks to do the above).
> Otherwise, you will find them working on "spike solutions". That again gives
> you the time to work in parallel. Find out the technology limitations. That
> will help you design solutions that are easily implementable and you can get
> it done with least resistance. Well, mostly.
>
> 5. Meet you project manager. He will be almost ready with a list of "user
> stories". Sync up your site-map and scenarios.
>
> 6. Go back to your client. Share your findings (vision, user needs,
> technology) and "help" them prioritize features/stories. Split the list of
> stories (backlog) into iterations.
>
> 7. Go back to you drawing board. Design for as many iterations as you can
> and define the patterns. You need to be ahead by as many iterations as you
> can. If possible design the whole thing even before development begins. You
> can always make changes as the product evolves. Test with your users using
> paper prototypes.
>
> 8. Let the development begin ...
>
> 9. Use every iteration (release) for usability testing and gather user
> feedback. Create additional stories (new/enhancement) and have
> them prioritized.
>
> That should set you up for success.
>
> All the best,
> --
> Bipul Keshri
> Senior Information Architect
> Sapient Corporation
>
>
>
>
>
> On Mon, Apr 21, 2008 at 8:23 PM, Rich Rogan <jrrogan at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > I've worked as the UX application design lead within Agile processes for 9
> > or so years. I've experienced a few key initiatives which increase Design
> > success with Agile, and which make projects more successful in general.
> >
> > Key Initiatives for Design success with Agile process:
> >
> > 1. Be flexible with the "Agile Methodology" – use aspects that work,
> > deprecate those that don't. Dogmatic process adherence can kill a project.
> >
> > 2. Keep design artifacts one iteration ahead of engineering – Design
> > doesn't
> > have to be waterfall, rather design has laid out a roadmap with
> > architecture
> > and business, and these deliverables are consumed, negotiated and enhanced
> > with engineering.
> >
> > 3. Design Strategic Interface/Interaction "Scaffolding" upfront/ in first
> > iteration – (This assumes the organization has Strategic vision, if not,
> > good luck and cash your checks quick ;). Strategic vision into the
> > business
> > domain and objectives are the design drivers. With this information design
> > can build interface "Scaffolding" to be reused and adapted to multiple
> > situations, (see "pattern libraries"). Note these interface patterns can
> > include deep domain specific interactions, which become component building
> > blocks. Interface scaffolding components should be "minimum viable" in
> > functionality and design, this will aide in all aspects of usability,
> > design
> > and development, including consistency, ease of testing and training.
> >
> > Has anyone else had success with these initiatives or others within an
> > Agile
> > process?
> >
> >
> > On 4/19/08, Sean Goggins <outdoors at acm.org> wrote:
> > >
> > > I think the conflict between design and agile development methods is
> > best
> > > understood by reflecting on the values conflict between the two
> > > disciplines.
> > >
> > > Here's a full list of the principles of agile development:
> > >
> > > http://agilemanifesto.org/principles.html
> > >
> > > These principles are ones I think designers and developers/technolgists
> > > will
> > > agree on in most cases:
> > > Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount
> > > of work not done--is essential.
> > >
> > > Welcome changing requirements, even late in
> > > development. Agile processes harness change for
> > > the customer's competitive advantage.
> > >
> > > These two fight design values the most:
> > > Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer
> > > through early and continuous delivery
> > > of valuable software.
> > >
> > > Working software is the primary measure of progress.
> > >
> > >
> > > This one has some risk because technology is "excellent", but design is
> > > merely "Good"...
> > > Continuous attention to technical excellence
> > > and good design enhances agility.
> > >
> > > Ten years ago software development was in a crisis. Agile methods have
> > > made
> > > a significant, positive impact on software development quality and
> > > productivity. As somebody with a software development background who is
> > > currently working both sides in the development of social software
> > systems
> > > in a research environment, I found this question interesting, and I hope
> > > the
> > > response is helpful.
> > >
> > >
> > > --
> > > Sean P. Goggins
> > > http://www.goggins.com
> > >
> > > ''Design is what you do when you don't [yet] know what you are doing.''
> > > -- George Stiny, Professor of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of
> > > Technology,
> > >
> > > "The game is a lot better because he played it, and I think that's the
> > > criteria that matters most."
> > > --Mike Ditka on Brett Favre
> > >
> > > http://www.wisconsinidea.wisc.edu/history.html
> > > ________________________________________________________________
> > > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
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> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
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28 Apr 2008 - 4:21pm
Casey Bishop
2008

I've been working in Agile environments for about 2 years, and still
consider myself a noob. However, all that has been said I agree with,
and in my experience, it seems to be the best approach if you are
lucky enough to determine your approach.

It could be just my dumb luck, but in the two larger projects I've
worked on, I've always been brought on late, and have had to fight
developers, BA's and in some cases others to understand what it is I
do and how important it is to the success of the product. After awhile
it seems to sink in, but at a cost.

This could however be in part to the inexperience of some
organizations to the role of IA's. Hopefully this type of situation
will be less common as the value of the position is demonstrated more
and more often in the future.

If you do encounter a resistant environment, do your best to prove
you way, and if they are truly agile they should be able to adapt for
the sake of the product and the users.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=28227

6 May 2008 - 2:42pm
leneleth
2008

Hi Manish

I will try to answer your questions:

In my former organization I was the only designer within the agile
development team.
I was working on different project at the same time, some was interlinked.

The prototyping I would do my self using xhtml, css and basic JavaScript to
prototype UI for ajax.
I would keep focused on prototyping the UI and UX and NOT trying to do the
developers's job.

My main activities was:
User research
Prototyping focusing on user needs
Prototyping the next step in development
User testing both types of prototypes

Feel free to ask if you have any more questions,
Lene

Do designers in Agile environment work on multiple
> projects or go on working on the same project week
> after week? How does it work in your
> organization?
>
> Do you work on the prototypes yourself( as in code em)
> or you still involve devs for the same?
>
> What do you do for the rest of the week? work on some
> other projects?
>
>

7 May 2008 - 4:44am
Itamar Medeiros
2006

I think that was a related post a while back in the list: there was
this really interesting talk during the IxDA Interactions '08
conference call "User Interface Design in an Agile Environment:
Enter the Design Studio".

The video of that talk has recently been made available at:
http://interaction08.ixda.org/Jeff_White and Jim Ungar.php

{ Itamar Medeiros } http://designative.info/

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=28227

7 May 2008 - 9:24am
Jim Ungar
2006

Thanks for the plug Itamar.

Jeff and I have used the design studio 8 times over the past year to put
design ahead of development and quickly explore design alternatives. We have
found it to be a great fit for Agile.

If anyone would like more details or has questions/comments - please feel
free to contact me.

http://interaction08.ixda.org/Jeff_White%20and%20Jim%20Ungar.php

Jim Ungar

On Wed, May 7, 2008 at 5:44 AM, Itamar Medeiros <medeiros.itamar at gmail.com>
wrote:

> I think that was a related post a while back in the list: there was
> this really interesting talk during the IxDA Interactions '08
> conference call "User Interface Design in an Agile Environment:
> Enter the Design Studio".
>
> The video of that talk has recently been made available at:
> http://interaction08.ixda.org/Jeff_White and Jim Ungar.php
>
> { Itamar Medeiros } http://designative.info/
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=28227
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

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