ISO: Research on interactive kiosks

21 Apr 2008 - 9:09am
6 years ago
2 replies
1759 reads
kimbieler
2007

Hey all,

I'm looking for any and all information on interactive kiosks I can
dig up: trade magazines, research papers, marketing surveys, best
practices, anecdotes, screen shots, whatever you can send my way.
Basically, I'm not having much luck doing Google searches on this
topic, and the only magazine devoted to kiosks seems to have folded
several years ago.

Thanks much.

-- Kim

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
Kim Bieler Graphic Design
www.kbgd.com
+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

Comments

21 Apr 2008 - 12:24pm
Chauncey Wilson
2007

Here are a few interesting sources:

Anatomy of a kiosk
http://www.thekioskfactory.com/anatomyof.html
You could take the components and look at issues with individual
components. For example, will there be enough heat dissipation
through the enclosure in the summer? What are the access point for
vandals (glue in the slots)? What about wheelchairs and parallax on
the screen? What about partially sighted users? You could take and
deconstruct the kiosk and list the problems with each component. Keep
in mind that maintainability is important as is security since these
are public.

What is a kiosk? (with notes on design)
http://blogs.msdn.com/embedded/archive/2005/03/15/396528.aspx

Check out www.hcibib.org, a wonderful compilation of tens of thousands
of HCI articles. I typed in Kiosk and got several dozen hits.
www.hcibib.org

Research from the University of Maryland
http://www.cs.umd.edu/Library/TRs/CS-TR-4293/CS-TR-4293.pdf

An article and site with some usability nuggets
http://www.kioskmarketplace.com/article.php?id=11794&prc=334

You might want to search on "touchscreen". There are some good design
guidelines on touchscreens that are relevant to kiosk design.

Forrester has written some papers on kiosk and did Best and Worst
reviews, but those reports cost around $400 if memory serves me right.

Postal kiosks might be a source of inspiration. IBM published some
work regarding the design of postal kiosks. I think that there might
be a paper at this year's UPA on kiosk design though I'll have to
check on that.

Thanks,
Chauncey

On Mon, Apr 21, 2008 at 10:09 AM, Kim Bieler <kimbieler at mindspring.com> wrote:
> Hey all,
>
> I'm looking for any and all information on interactive kiosks I can
> dig up: trade magazines, research papers, marketing surveys, best
> practices, anecdotes, screen shots, whatever you can send my way.
> Basically, I'm not having much luck doing Google searches on this
> topic, and the only magazine devoted to kiosks seems to have folded
> several years ago.
>
> Thanks much.
>
>
> -- Kim
>
> + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
> Kim Bieler Graphic Design
> www.kbgd.com
> + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
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23 Apr 2008 - 2:16am
Harry Brignull
2004

Kim,

AFAIK one of the main problems with kiosks is getting people to actually go up to them and use them. This can be a problem for the interaction designers who spend ages sorting out all the tiny UI details, only for their creation to ultimately get plonked in the corner of a shop in a low visibility or awkward location, never to get used. You can also get a "stage fright" effect where people don't want to look stupid in public / aren't quite sure what's involved in using the kiosk.

I wrote about this in my PhD thesis, which was (loosely) about facilitating the adoption of situated displays in public spaces. I'd be happy to send you a copy if you like, it's not 100% relevant to you but there may be some useful bits in there.

A while back I was involved in some consulting for a train company who wanted to increase usage of the ticket vending machines on the platforms (people were tending to queue up to use the human vendors). They initially thought it was UI design problem - but actually we found that people often just couldn't see the machines. Signage needs to take into account the effect of bodily occlusion - it needs to be above head height to be seen easily through a crowd.

A short paper you may also want to look at is "The complexity of good intentions" by Andrew Swartz of Serco:

http://www.serco.com/usability/research/papers/

Hope this helps

Harry

http://www.90percentofeverything.com

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