Animotion Sickness?

24 Apr 2008 - 3:53pm
6 years ago
3 replies
780 reads
Rob Nero
2005

(no, that isn't a typo)

Has anyone encountered motion sickness on a website or webapp that animates
the interaction too much?

I am in the middle of designing a new navigational paradigm for enterprise
webapps that would heavily use the scriptaculous animation framework. The
idea is that each click of diving deeper into the application and content,
each layer deeper would animate onto the screen to show the relationship of
content.

While watching a coworker demonstrate a prototype he developed, I started
getting concerned that too much animation might be a bad thing. Though it
nicely illustrates the relationships of the content, maybe it is overkill?

Your thoughts or experience?
thanks!
Rob

Comments

25 Apr 2008 - 3:24am
Alexander Baxevanis
2007

I don't think there's anything bad with animation per se. If you look
around you, lots of things are naturally animated. Turning a page on a
book is "animation". Unzipping your bag, opening a drawer etc. is also
"animation". Unlike computers, the physical world is not built around
discrete states. This doesn't mean that our designs must emulate 100%
of the real world, but there is a lot that can we can learn from it.
For example, you can half-open a drawer and take a quick peek inside -
as soon as you realise this is not the drawer you want, you can close
it quicker than if it was fully open.

So far few interfaces have taken advantage of such nuances: an
interesting example is Bumptop (http://www.bumptop.com/).

The danger of animation is that, unless you learn a good lesson from
the physical world, you can easily design something that is unnatural
& excessive. If people see "physical" animations every day, they have
certain expectations what they should look like. Taking physics into
account, as is done in Bumptop or in the iPhone UI goes a long way
towards fulfilling such expectations. The context of use is also
important in determining the pace & amount of animation. Again, taking
an example from the physical world, the animation that you get in your
visual field is much different if you're in a fairground (where
everything is animated and trying to attract your attention) than when
you're sitting in a quite room turning the pages of a book.

Animation has sometimes been given a bad name because of two things:
over-zealous out-of-context use, and performance issues that make it
look completely unnatural. If you manage to steer away from those
issues, then I don't think it's an "overkill".

Hope this helps!

Alex

P.S. Animation has also been discussed earlier in the following posts:

http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=17083
http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=17082
http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=16373

On Thu, Apr 24, 2008 at 9:53 PM, Rob Nero <rob at nerointerfaces.com> wrote:
>
> (no, that isn't a typo)
>
> Has anyone encountered motion sickness on a website or webapp that animates
> the interaction too much?
>
> I am in the middle of designing a new navigational paradigm for enterprise
> webapps that would heavily use the scriptaculous animation framework. The
> idea is that each click of diving deeper into the application and content,
> each layer deeper would animate onto the screen to show the relationship of
> content.
>
> While watching a coworker demonstrate a prototype he developed, I started
> getting concerned that too much animation might be a bad thing. Though it
> nicely illustrates the relationships of the content, maybe it is overkill?
>
> Your thoughts or experience?
> thanks!
> Rob
>
> ________________________________________________________________
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>

24 Apr 2008 - 4:52pm
Duncan Brown
2008

I personally find too much animation makes me feel nauseous and giddy.

I can't play first person type computer games either (I also know quite a few other people with similar 'motion sickness').

Animation that draws attention to important screen areas/changes is good.

How are you using anim. to show inter/relationships?

How often would the animation cycle? if it's only once every 30 mins. or so it might be OK for me, but if it happens every few minutes it might be too much.

Not sure what real world examples/research there are about this, but I would also be interested if anyone can shed more scientific light on this subject...

Duncan Brown
www.designbrown.com

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25 Apr 2008 - 3:24am
Duncan Brown
2008

I personally find too much animation makes me feel nauseous and giddy.

I can't play first person type computer games either (I also know
quite a few other people with similar 'motion sickness').

Animation that draws attention to important screen areas/changes is
good.

How are you using anim. to show inter/relationships?

How often would the animation cycle? if it's only once every 30
mins. or so it might be OK for me, but if it happens every few
minutes it might be too much.

Not sure what real world examples/research there are about this, but
I would also be interested if anyone can shed more scientific light
on this subject...

Duncan Brown
www.designbrown.com

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=28395

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