Placement of username and password on homepage

24 Apr 2008 - 7:27pm
6 years ago
7 replies
1613 reads
Kinjal
2006

I am working on a web app and was looking if there is any research/guidelines on placement of username and password on the homepage. Yahoo mail and Gmail places username and password to the right, facebook to the left of the screen. Does it matter where its placed. I quickly googled and couldn't find any link on the same so posting this question here.

I found Jared Spool's article "8 More Design Mistakes with Account Sign-in" but it doesn't list the details on placement.

Would appreciate any inputs or link if anyone could provide.

Regards,
Kinjal

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Comments

24 Apr 2008 - 8:51pm
dszuc
2005

Hi Kinjal:

"Top right" is a common design pattern and expect users will look for
it here.

However, suggest that the "login component" can have a particular look
& feel that makes it easier to differentiate from other page
components (independent of the location)

Also see:

http://www.welie.com/patterns/showPattern.php?patternID=login
http://www.uie.com/articles/elements_of_a_design_pattern/
http://www.sitepoint.com/kits/usability1/ (see "Usability Blueprint"
on "Login")

rgds,
--
Daniel Szuc
Principal Usability Consultant
Apogee Usability Asia Ltd
www.apogeehk.com
Usability in Asia

The Usability Kit - www.theusabilitykit.com

On 25 Apr 2008, at 9:27 AM, Kinjal wrote:

> I am working on a web app and was looking if there is any research/
> guidelines on placement of username and password on the homepage.
> Yahoo mail and Gmail places username and password to the right,
> facebook to the left of the screen. Does it matter where its placed.
> I quickly googled and couldn't find any link on the same so posting
> this question here.
>
> I found Jared Spool's article "8 More Design Mistakes with Account
> Sign-in" but it doesn't list the details on placement.
>
> Would appreciate any inputs or link if anyone could provide.
>
> Regards,
> Kinjal
>
>
>
>
>
> ____________________________________________________________________________________
> Be a better friend, newshound, and
> know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
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24 Apr 2008 - 7:29pm
Weixi Yen
2007

for applications, logins should be front and center or right top. for
websites with optional sign-in, right top.

25 Apr 2008 - 12:15pm
Pieter Jansegers
2008

I did have numerous email accounts before having gmail (100+), and the
difference to me is that you always read or scan the information that is
presented on the same page if this information in placed on the left of the
inlog.

Attention to place the inlog not to much to the right neither: people with
small screens and not immediately computerwise get completely confused not
finding the inlog when it disappears from their screens.

Pieter Jansegers
http://webosophy.ning.com

On 4/25/08, Kinjal <kinju_3 at yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> I am working on a web app and was looking if there is any
> research/guidelines on placement of username and password on the homepage.
> Yahoo mail and Gmail places username and password to the right, facebook to
> the left of the screen. Does it matter where its placed. I quickly googled
> and couldn't find any link on the same so posting this question here.
>
> I found Jared Spool's article "8 More Design Mistakes with Account
> Sign-in" but it doesn't list the details on placement.
>
> Would appreciate any inputs or link if anyone could provide.
>
> Regards,
> Kinjal
>
>
>
>
>
> ____________________________________________________________________________________
> Be a better friend, newshound, and
> know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
> http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

25 Apr 2008 - 12:54pm
Melinda Bonneville
2008

I recently attended an HFI class and was pointed to a piece of
research called, "Examining User Expectations of the Location of Web
Objects". The study reported that users generally expected the Login
element of e-commerce sites to be located in the upper-left corner of
the page just after the logo. The study was publish in 2002, but
seems to hold water. Look at Amazon and other big e-commerce sites.

I don't think this is the whole study...

http://www.internettg.org/newsletter/dec00/article_bernard.html
http://psychology.wichita.edu/surl/usabilitynews/62/web_object_international.htm

The presentation...
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/hfes/hfproc/2003/00000047/00000011/art00008

I hope you find this helpful.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=28399

25 Apr 2008 - 1:31pm
Victor Lombardi
2003

On Fri, Apr 25, 2008 at 2:54 PM, Melinda Bonneville
<melinda.bonneville at yahoo.com> wrote:
> ... "Examining User Expectations of the Location of Web
> Objects". ...
> http://www.internettg.org/newsletter/dec00/article_bernard.html

James Kalbach reminds us that "such research does not correlate
breaking these expectations with actual usability (see: Michael
Bernard, http://www.internettg.org/newsletter/dec00/article_bernard.html
and Jakob Nielsen, http://www.useit.com/alertbox/991114.html). That
is, while users normally anticipate a left-hand navigation,
positioning the navigation elsewhere does not necessarily result in
usability problems."

From:
Challenging the Status Quo: Audi Redesigned
http://www.boxesandarrows.com/view/challenging_the_status_quo_audi_redesigned

25 Apr 2008 - 2:21pm
Loredana
2008

I was recently researching the same thing.
I believe the most important question to ask is what is the scope of
the site, and what value does the registration/account feature
provide for the user.

Looking at Alexa's top 100 sites, you'll discover that generally for
sites designed to serve mainly registered users (such as social
networks, web email clients) the login *fields* are displayed
on the right-hand site, generally in the mid-upper region.

However, if the site is not designed to only serve registered users
(think CNN.com or Amazon, etc) the fields are not displayed, and a
simple "login" text link is placed on the right or left-hand side at
the top and respectively next, or under the logo.

That being said, there are exceptions to this general rule...
Depending on how important login is for your site, you might consider
any of these placements.

Loredana

29 Apr 2008 - 8:38am
Steve Schang
2008

Melinda's post correlates to what we discovered when redesigning our
homepage. Our usability participants expected username and password
to be in the upper left of the homepage. Keep in mind that logging-in
is what over 90% of our visitors do when visiting our site. If
logging-in is not your site's primary task, username and password
could be placed somewhere else and reserve that prime real estate for
something else.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=28399

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