Managing Change (Was: Iterative Change Manageme nt/ Patriarchs of the Design Family)

26 Nov 2003 - 9:53am
10 years ago
1 reply
517 reads
Marike Maring
2003

Just a note about designing better solutions for certain transportation
problems: The development (and amount of lobbying needed to get states to
allow this vehicle on the sidewalk) of the Segway seems an interesting
example. See http://www.segway.com/

Marike.

-----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
Van:
discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesign
ers.com]Namens Jenifer Tidwell
Verzonden: maandag 24 november 2003 18:26
Aan: Peter Bagnall
CC: discuss at interactiondesigners.com; Narey, Kevin
Onderwerp: Re: [ID Discuss] Managing Change (Was: Iterative Change
Manageme nt/ Patriarchs of the Design Family)

On Mon, 24 Nov 2003, Peter Bagnall wrote:

> I suppose this comes down to an ethical argument. As designers should
> we be held responsible for the long term results of our designs,
> including their social, environmental, and other effect. Or are we only
> responsible for the bottom line.

Isn't it both? And when they clash -- well, that's why we have
such trouble sometimes deciding what the best solution is, and
maybe that drives us to find solutions that are better for both
business and the good of the world.

Personally, I think that's the most rewarding kind of problem
to solve. When it's solvable.

Not to sidetrack us onto a discussion of the design of specific
car models, but I recently had the opportunity to drive a hybrid
car around for a while. (A 2004 Prius.) There *is* still some
innovation going on in the car industry, folks. A lot of it is
on display in the newest hybrids, like this one. I wrote a review
of it here:

http://jtidwell.net/writing/prius.html

It's still a full-sized sedan, though. I, and I suspect CD Evans
too, would like to see much smaller, appropriate-technology solutions
to the transportation problem, especially in developing countries.
But in the Western world, we have a HUGE installed-base problem,
don't we? I don't want to be the first to drive a <1000-lb car
on American roads! Neither does anyone else! And therein lies
the problem...

- Jenifer

P.S. Where would be an appropriate place to "publish" a review
like that? Boxes and Arrows? Seems outside their charter...

--------------------------------------------
Jenifer Tidwell
w: jtidwell at mathworks.com
h: jtidwell at alum.mit.edu
http://time-tripper.com/uipatterns/
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Comments

26 Nov 2003 - 12:40pm
Alain D. M. G. ...
2003

Hello!

>
> It's still a full-sized sedan, though. I, and I suspect CD Evans
> too, would like to see much smaller, appropriate-technology solutions
> to the transportation problem, especially in developing countries.
> But in the Western world, we have a HUGE installed-base problem,
> don't we? I don't want to be the first to drive a <1000-lb car
> on American roads! Neither does anyone else! And therein lies
> the problem...
>

Another way of looking at it is to say that the trick is to keep those
lightweight or ultralightweight vehicles on separate roads, or more
precisely on elevated or sunken guideways. This approach as been
advocated by PRT (Personal Rapid Transit) people for nearly 40 years
now.

The debate on what kind of guideway to use or to invent from scratch
has been a hot one, matched only by the debate between proponents of
single mode or dual mode (capable of going only on the guideways or
capable of going on both guideways and public highways) systems.

The only full scale true PRT system (a "false" one which sometimes run
as normal rapid transit and sometimes as a true on-demand point to
point PRT is in small scale operation at the Morganton campus of the
university of Virginia) to have reached realistic protoype form in
pre-production trials is the ULTRA system, being tried out for cardiff,
Wales.

PRT vehicles ca be considerd as robot taxis but it would be also
correct to say that each vehicle is a quasi-independent transort
peripheral or that a full scale city-wide or city and inter-city PRT
system has the goal of doing to human transportation what the Internet
did to personal text communication. In other words, it applies the
principles of automatic packet routing to small (4 passengers
usually)automatic electric cars taking their energy from a common feed
and circulating singly or in platoons on dedicated guideways.

The approach to PRT systems has been guided mostly from the viewpoint
of engineers until now, so there is a great deal to be done from the
human factors point of view and human interaction design in these
systems is a humongus challenge.

The best source of links to PRT studies is still:

http://faculty.washington.edu/~jbs/itrans/

A generic PRT system has everything I love about public transit and
nothing of what I totally hate about public transit. It also has the
point to point qualities of the car, but none its chaotic elements.

Alain V.

__________________________________________________________
Lèche-vitrine ou lèche-écran ?
magasinage.yahoo.ca

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