Great product, eh? (I'm pretty sure it isn't real ... Yet!)

5 Oct 2004 - 9:03am
9 years ago
6 replies
606 reads
Dave Malouf
2005

http://www.lukew.com/ff/entry.asp?109

The idea is a wardrobe watcher. Similar to the internet based
refrigerators, but this one is a lot better.

I guess you can take the idea of the internet fridge and add in
nutritional information and when you try to take someting out AGAINST your
diet it will beep at you or electrocute or something like that. hmm? Now
where is that WeightWatcher's contact? AND have a direct link to Fresh
Direct <http://freshdirect.com> (New York online grocery store).

-- dave

Comments

5 Oct 2004 - 9:42am
Lada Gorlenko
2004

> http://www.lukew.com/ff/entry.asp?109

David's link reminded me of a collection of visionary articles by BT
(British Telecom) futurologists (that's a very much official job title) on
the future of many things, from active skin to warfare. Amazing or amusing,
it is an easy read you may find insightful:
http://www.btexact.com/publications/futurology

My personal favourites include "The future of the bathroom"
<http://www.btexact.com/publications/futurology?doc=21031> and "The future
of death" <http://www.btexact.com/publications/futurology?doc=21053>

They say that "biological death might still be unpleasant, but it need no
longer be a career barrier". How about that?

Lada
www.ibm.com/easy

6 Oct 2004 - 12:52am
Listera
2004

David Heller:

> I guess you can take the idea of the internet fridge and add in nutritional
> information and when you try to take someting out AGAINST your diet it will
> beep at you or electrocute or something like that.

Yes, and I'm sick and tired of these external appliances/gadgets having IP
numbers, intelligence and such. I say screw these inanimate objects; let's
bite the bullet and implant an HTTP server/RFID processor into everyone and
be done with it.
:-)

Ziya
Nullius in Verba

6 Oct 2004 - 2:23am
Dan Zlotnikov
2004

<snip>
I say screw these inanimate objects; let's
> bite the bullet and implant an HTTP server/RFID processor into everyone and
> be done with it.
> :-)
>
> Ziya
> Nullius in Verba
>

I was going to point at the IPv6 FAQ and say "be careful what you wish
for," but the FAQ is down. Should that be taken as a hint that the IxD
job prospects are glowing in the future? :)

But (a bit more) seriously, the idea of being able to log into a
person or group of persons has been bandied around quite a bit in
science fiction. William Gibson's "Idoru" is one example that comes to
mind. A more recent one is Cory Doctorow's "Down and Out in the Magic
Kingdom," also available for download on his site.
http://www.craphound.com

Dan

--
WatCHI
http://www.acm.org/chapters/watchi

6 Oct 2004 - 2:48am
Listera
2004

Dan Zlotnikov:

> But (a bit more) seriously, the idea of being able to log into a
> person or group of persons has been bandied around quite a bit in
> science fiction.

SF has a lot to catch up with reality then:

Mexican Attorney General, Staff Get Chip Implants:
<http://www.govtech.net/magazine/channel_story.php?channel=24&id=90885>

:-)

Ziya
Nullius in Verba

6 Oct 2004 - 10:53am
Dan Zlotnikov
2004

Usability note: It really annoys me that Gmail doesn't have a "save
draft" option.

> SF has a lot to catch up with reality then:
>
> Mexican Attorney General, Staff Get Chip Implants:
> <http://www.govtech.net/magazine/channel_story.php?channel=24&id=90885>

Oy. Talk about the bleeding edge. Next, we're gonna get chips that are
powered by haemoglobin and check the DNA signature of the carrier,
shutting down in case of a mismatch. But hey, why stop there? The next
step would be tailored viruses attacking anyone who stupidly attempts
to remove the chip.

And of course, there're always the privacy and security concerns.
Should this trend continue, highjackers won't even need to know the
officials' faces to know who can access sensitive information -- they
can just scan for specific signatures and grab whoever has the chip.
Didn't the US Navy plan the same approach to identifying and locating
its personnel?

Dan

--
WatCHI
http://www.acm.org/chapters/watchi

6 Oct 2004 - 12:55pm
Listera
2004

Dan Zlotnikov:

> Usability note: It really annoys me that Gmail doesn't have a "save
> draft" option.

And finally... Save Drafts!
For when you can't find the right words, save drafts and find them later.
Learn more:
<http://gmail.google.com/support/bin/answer.py?answer=6587>

> And of course, there're always the privacy and security concerns.
> Should this trend continue, highjackers won't even need to know the
> officials' faces to know who can access sensitive information -- they
> can just scan for specific signatures and grab whoever has the chip.

Or they can get an RFID reader to scan private info as you walk around the
airport with your passport in your pocket:

"The first biometric passports will be phased in progressively from 2005.
Biometric passports and visas are intended to improve authentication of the
documents themselves and not, at least in the short term, to identify
potential terrorists by means of automatic comparison between the individual
and a blacklist of people stored on a distant server.

That kind of procedure is predicted in a second phase, when the technology
will be more efficient, by using 3D comparisons and skin-texture analysis.

<http://www.rfidnews.org/weblog/2004/08/12/uk-biometric-passport-update/>

Ziya
Nullius in Verba

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