Any usability studies on free hand gestures?

1 May 2008 - 11:43pm
6 years ago
3 replies
636 reads
Amnon Dekel
2005

Thanks- I know of Lee's work- and have been using it since 3 days ago- and
it is very cool- BUT - the issue I am exploring is NOT how to technically
IMPLEMENT gesture analysis and tracking (there is a lot of published work on
that), but rather a search for *design guidelines for best gestures* to
implement- i.e. rules to help a designer select gestures. The rules should
include things like from what physical poses gestures should start, how they
should end, which gestures are more readily understood and easy to learn by
users etc.

Thanks

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Kevin Doyle <kbdoyle at gmail.com>
To: discuss at ixda.org
Date: Thu, 1 May 2008 11:45:11
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Any usabilty studies on free hand gestures?
Hi Amnon,

Johnny Chung Lee has developed a computer interface tech that uses
hand gestures and head movements... using a $40 Wii controller (aka:
Wiimote) and some custom programming.

http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~johnny/projects/wii/<http://www.cs.cmu.edu/%7Ejohnny/projects/wii/>

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Amnon Dekel
Cell: +972 54 813-8160
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Comments

2 May 2008 - 1:37am
Dan Saffer
2003

On May 1, 2008, at 9:43 PM, Amnon Dekel wrote:

> *design guidelines for best gestures* to
> implement- i.e. rules to help a designer select gestures. The rules
> should
> include things like from what physical poses gestures should start,
> how they
> should end, which gestures are more readily understood and easy to
> learn by
> users etc.

This is what my new book is about. While I'm not a fan of rules per
se, I do go into things to think about when selecting, documenting,
prototyping, and, of course, designing interactive gestures. Some of
which is in the first chapter, a draft of which can be downloaded from
the book's website:

<http://www.designinggesturalinterfaces.com>

Dan Saffer
Interactive Gestures: Designing Gestural Interfaces
O'Reilly, Fall 2008

2 May 2008 - 3:19am
Caroline Jarrett
2007

From: "Amnon Dekel" <amnoid at gmail.com>
> but rather a search for *design guidelines for best gestures* to implement- i.e. rules to help a designer select gestures. The
> rules should include things like from what physical poses gestures should start, how they should end, which gestures are more
> readily understood and easy to learn by users etc.

Dan Saffer's work seems to be the definitive place to start.

Here are a few other ideas: all somewhat non-specific but they may help.

There's a new chapter book edited by Kortum: "Beyond the GUI". Each chapter has a description and guidelines for a different type of
non-GUI interface including haptics etc. I reviewed the chapters in draft but I haven't yet seen the published book. I can't
remember if it has just what you need but it's probably worth a good look for the references alone. (Academic book, lots of refs in
it).

A lot of the Australians are very interested in remote working and the interpretation of gestures involved in remote working - it's
natural given their geography. (e.g., doctors remote from patients). There were some interesting presentations on this at OzCHI
2007. I'm not sure that they are exactly what you want but again, it might give you some references to follow up.

I was just reading some reports of CHI2008 on www.usabilitynews.com. It seems that there was quite a bit on non-traditional
interfaces - those might also be a place to start looking.

Best,

Caroline Jarrett
caroline.jarrett at effortmark.co.uk
07990 570647

Effortmark Ltd
Usability - Forms - Content

We have moved. New address:
16 Heath Road
Leighton Buzzard
LU7 3AB

2 May 2008 - 7:32am
Chauncey Wilson
2007

I'll second Caroline's suggestion of reading Beyond the GUI. I just
read several chapters of the book which just came out including the
chapter on Gesture Interfaces and find it an excellent mix of
research and practical advice. Each chapter, has a set of design
guidelines and many have techniques for testing the non-GUI interfaces
or in the gesture chapter, a section on "How to build and test a
gesture vocabulary". I think that the research adds to the practice
so far in that each chapter describes the primary human factors
associated with the interface so there is some foundation and
rationale with additional references for real depth.

The reference is:

Kortum, P. (2008). HCI beyond the GUI: Design for haptic, speech,
olfactory, and other non-traditional interfaces. Amsterdam: Morgan
Kaufmann.

This book is somewhat along the lines of Mayhew's classic book from
around 1992, Principles and Guidelines in Software User Interface
Design which reviewed research theory and then abstracted principles
and guidelines from that theory. Books that connect research, theory,
adn practice are powerful and provide a stronger foundation for
recommendations.

Chauncey

> There's a new chapter book edited by Kortum: "Beyond the GUI". Each chapter has a description and guidelines for a different type of
> non-GUI interface including haptics etc. I reviewed the chapters in draft but I haven't yet seen the published book. I can't
> remember if it has just what you need but it's probably worth a good look for the references alone. (Academic book, lots of refs in
> it).

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