too much feedback?

17 May 2008 - 5:08am
5 years ago
7 replies
673 reads
Apar Maniar
2008

Hi everyone

I took a look at this photo
http://www.flickr.com/photos/albaum/2495004994/sizes/l/

and this got me thinking that while it is a good rule of thumb to give the
user feedback, how and when does feedback stop being helpful and become
overkill or just plain nuisance.

I cant remember the countless number of times I have t click on the little
"x" to get rid of the network connection notification in XP somewhere in the
subconscious it hurts

Apar

--
The goal of the action is the action itself!

Comments

17 May 2008 - 12:24pm
Raminder Oberoi
2007

Made me laugh. But also realized that Windows OS didn't know
travellers at JFK were its users.

• Raminder Oberoi

On May 17, 2008, at 6:08 AM, "Apar Maniar" <apar.maniar at gmail.com>
wrote:

> Hi everyone
>
> I took a look at this photo
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/albaum/2495004994/sizes/l/
>
> and this got me thinking that while it is a good rule of thumb to
> give the
> user feedback, how and when does feedback stop being helpful and
> become
> overkill or just plain nuisance.
>
> I cant remember the countless number of times I have t click on the
> little
> "x" to get rid of the network connection notification in XP
> somewhere in the
> subconscious it hurts
>
> Apar
>
> --
> The goal of the action is the action itself!
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

17 May 2008 - 1:43pm
Mario Bourque
2008

I like seeing the BSOD on an ATM. It really inspires confidence.

@mariobourque

On Sat, May 17, 2008 at 1:24 PM, Raminder Oberoi <sinioberoi at gmail.com>
wrote:

>
> Made me laugh. But also realized that Windows OS didn't know travellers at
> JFK were its users.
>
> • Raminder Oberoi
>
>
> On May 17, 2008, at 6:08 AM, "Apar Maniar" <apar.maniar at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Hi everyone
>>
>> I took a look at this photo
>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/albaum/2495004994/sizes/l/
>>
>> and this got me thinking that while it is a good rule of thumb to give the
>> user feedback, how and when does feedback stop being helpful and become
>> overkill or just plain nuisance.
>>
>> I cant remember the countless number of times I have t click on the little
>> "x" to get rid of the network connection notification in XP somewhere in
>> the
>> subconscious it hurts
>>
>> Apar
>>
>> --
>> The goal of the action is the action itself!
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
Mario Bourque
mariobourque.com / mario at mariobourque.com

17 May 2008 - 4:41pm
Apar Maniar
2008

By all means use it in the ppt, but I am not the one to capture this
brilliant shot, I happen to hit on it while browsing through flickr, better
thing would be to quote the person who originally took the shit (oh and if
that person is picky ask permission from him/her too)

@Raminder- I was not talking about just this particular instance by itself I
wanted to see what people think would be considered as overkill when it
comes to feedback, if people have examples to quote even better

Apar

On Sun, May 18, 2008 at 1:12 AM, spam at skinnywhite.com <spam at skinnywhite.com>
wrote:

> Thank you for posting this. May I use it in a PPT presentation and cite
> your name as source. HILARIOUS.
>
> michael
>
> userRESEARCH.com
>
> Michael R. Summers
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Apar Maniar wrote:
>
>> Hi everyone
>>
>> I took a look at this photo
>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/albaum/2495004994/sizes/l/
>>
>> and this got me thinking that while it is a good rule of thumb to give the
>> user feedback, how and when does feedback stop being helpful and become
>> overkill or just plain nuisance.
>>
>> I cant remember the countless number of times I have t click on the little
>> "x" to get rid of the network connection notification in XP somewhere in
>> the
>> subconscious it hurts
>>
>> Apar
>>
>>
>>
>

--
The goal of the action is the action itself!

17 May 2008 - 10:43pm
Sanket Bindle
2008

Well another example for feedback overkill is again from windows.

I all windows version XP onwards, whenever you install a new program, All
programs in start menuis highlighted to show that a new program has been
installed. The point is untill you access that program from the start menu
it will be shown highlighted, even if you have used it many times from your
desktop. Its kind of annoying that you should access each program through
start menu atleast once to remove that.

Sanket Bindle
PG IDD
National Institute of Design

On Sun, May 18, 2008 at 3:11 AM, Apar Maniar <apar.maniar at gmail.com> wrote:

> By all means use it in the ppt, but I am not the one to capture this
> brilliant shot, I happen to hit on it while browsing through flickr, better
> thing would be to quote the person who originally took the shit (oh and if
> that person is picky ask permission from him/her too)
>
> @Raminder- I was not talking about just this particular instance by itself
> I
> wanted to see what people think would be considered as overkill when it
> comes to feedback, if people have examples to quote even better
>
> Apar
>
> On Sun, May 18, 2008 at 1:12 AM, spam at skinnywhite.com <
> spam at skinnywhite.com>
> wrote:
>
> > Thank you for posting this. May I use it in a PPT presentation and cite
> > your name as source. HILARIOUS.
> >
> > michael
> >
> > userRESEARCH.com
> >
> > Michael R. Summers
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Apar Maniar wrote:
> >
> >> Hi everyone
> >>
> >> I took a look at this photo
> >> http://www.flickr.com/photos/albaum/2495004994/sizes/l/
> >>
> >> and this got me thinking that while it is a good rule of thumb to give
> the
> >> user feedback, how and when does feedback stop being helpful and become
> >> overkill or just plain nuisance.
> >>
> >> I cant remember the countless number of times I have t click on the
> little
> >> "x" to get rid of the network connection notification in XP somewhere in
> >> the
> >> subconscious it hurts
> >>
> >> Apar
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
>
>
> --
> The goal of the action is the action itself!
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

18 May 2008 - 5:21am
Charles Hannon
2008

I wouldn't call either of these system messages (desktop items or
newly installed programs) examples of "feedback." Feedback should
be thought of as the system's response indicating that it has
correctly (or not) received the user's intended action. These are
examples of unnecessary and annoying notifications intended, I guess,
for perpetual beginners. Why isn't there at least a simple "never
see this message again" link embedded in them?

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=29156

18 May 2008 - 5:56am
Apar Maniar
2008

Thanks Charles you hit the nail on the head, I would love to be able to at
least control how often I get to see the message.

To give an example where it is useful, back in the day when before tabbed
browsing was a new concept you would end up opening every new site on a
different browser window, which would automatically lead you into the habit
of closing the window when you are done using with a particular site and it
would not be not much of a hassle. But when multiple tabs were opened within
the same window it became necessary to let the user know that closing the
window would close all tabs, I remember I let that option be on for several
weeks to get used to this new way of interacting with a browser window, and
it had prevented me accidentally closing a tab that I was still in the
middle of reading or doing a task.

The key being they allowed me to keep reminding them and once I got used to
the whole idea I clicked on "don't remind me anymore" and it was gone

I haven't come across a similar mechanism to turn these "annoying messages"
off, which also begs a question if this is not considered feedback then what
category would it fall under?

Apar

On Sun, May 18, 2008 at 3:51 PM, Charles Hannon <channon at washjeff.edu>
wrote:

> I wouldn't call either of these system messages (desktop items or
> newly installed programs) examples of "feedback." Feedback should
> be thought of as the system's response indicating that it has
> correctly (or not) received the user's intended action. These are
> examples of unnecessary and annoying notifications intended, I guess,
> for perpetual beginners. Why isn't there at least a simple "never
> see this message again" link embedded in them?
>
>
>

18 May 2008 - 5:08pm
Konrad
2008

For anyone annoyed with balloons - here's the solution:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307729

You can turn them off once and for all. I did it and can't say it has ever
created an issue.

Best,
Konrad

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