Is a Flash-intro to a personal portfolio still good/relevant?

21 May 2008 - 8:32am
6 years ago
7 replies
894 reads
DrWex
2006

Let's assume that you've done the proper work to provide a "Skip
Intro" button. Let's further assume that you've done at least the
minimum to make your content accessible to people without the Flash
player.

The question I ask, then, is: does having a Flash intro to a personal
site, which may include one's portfolio or resume, make sense in
today's job market and design environment? Or does this brand the
designer as someone stuck in the last decade?

As usual, I suspect the answer is "it depends"; what I'm really
interested in is exploring issues around how we present ourselves in
online presences and the Flash-intro or Flash-site is a method I still
see from time to time, though not nearly as much as I used to.

Best regards,
--Alan

Comments

21 May 2008 - 10:11am
Mike Dunn
2008

I pretty much operate under the rule of thumb that a flash intro is never a
good idea. If you absolutely have to have something even remotely like one,
design it as a flash embed on your index page. Basically, give your
audience one less click to get into the real substance of the site rather
than the opportunity to blow it off.
I guess what I'm saying is, it's not a question of whether it makes sense in
today's job or design market, it's a question of usability. Put your content
front and center.

-MIKE D

On Wed, May 21, 2008 at 8:32 AM, Alan Wexelblat <awexelblat at gmail.com>
wrote:

> Let's assume that you've done the proper work to provide a "Skip
> Intro" button. Let's further assume that you've done at least the
> minimum to make your content accessible to people without the Flash
> player.
>
> The question I ask, then, is: does having a Flash intro to a personal
> site, which may include one's portfolio or resume, make sense in
> today's job market and design environment? Or does this brand the
> designer as someone stuck in the last decade?
>
> As usual, I suspect the answer is "it depends"; what I'm really
> interested in is exploring issues around how we present ourselves in
> online presences and the Flash-intro or Flash-site is a method I still
> see from time to time, though not nearly as much as I used to.
>
> Best regards,
> --Alan
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
Michael Dunn
FoolishStudios
www.foolishstudios.com

21 May 2008 - 10:53am
Andante
2008

In general, I do not like Flash intros or splash pages.

Not "it depends". In my mind, if you do a Flash-site, your whole
web site should be contained within that flash movie, if you can work
with a good programmer, the technology allows you to do that.
Attention Adobe Flex.

Having say that, I also think that if a particular page/section of
your website embeds a Flash movie, it is OK. For example, a
photographer's web site can take advantage of a flash movie to
present their portfolio, as a way to protect the images from being
stolen, and keep the rest of the web site as HTML/CSS/JS.

The splash page is dead, long live the splash page!

Enrique Sallent

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=29277

21 May 2008 - 4:27pm
james horgan
2008

it does depends. if youve a long loading time, god forbid, youd better
distract them with something decent. or hire a better programmer.
if youre an animator, why not? usability, schmusability, you're there to
entertain. people hear flash intro and go all negative and dark, but if
youre waiting for a fantastic experience, then the wait should be just as
enjoyable. some of the best sites ive seen have leveraged the annoyance of a
loading bar to produce a highly entertaining and fun experience. i would
think about the context of your site and whether you can use the loading to
your advantage to highlight your talents, if not, i would drop it if you
can.

21 May 2008 - 3:31pm
kimbieler
2007

Alan,

I've lately come around to the idea that designers' sites can still be
effective in Flash. Most of us don't really need to worry about SEO
since we're getting business though referrals, not cold visits, and it
does give you a chance to show off a little more.

But what I disagree with is a Flash introduction that has no
relationship to the rest of the site. Especially if all it does is
animate your name or some goofy tagline or waste my time loading the
navigation in a sexy way. If you have a strong concept for the site
and your Flash intro reinforces that concept in an extremely effective
way, that is cool. And rare.

Most people coming to my site are just idle visitors or people who got
there by mistake. I don't care about them. The people I do care about
are qualified referrals -- people who heard about me from a friend or
business associate. These are folks who need a designer and are
checking the site to vet me before making a call. All my site needs to
do is convince them to call me. (Insert caveats about the lame-ass
state of my current website here...)

I'm guessing a snazzy Flash intro will convince the people who want
one for THEIR site. But everyone else is going to be wondering, "Yeah,
but has he got any experience designing for MY type of project?" My
advice: skip the eye candy and cut to the chase. After all, isn't that
what you'd advise clients to do?

On May 21, 2008, at 9:32 AM, Alan Wexelblat wrote:

> Let's assume that you've done the proper work to provide a "Skip
> Intro" button. Let's further assume that you've done at least the
> minimum to make your content accessible to people without the Flash
> player.
>
> The question I ask, then, is: does having a Flash intro to a personal
> site, which may include one's portfolio or resume, make sense in
> today's job market and design environment? Or does this brand the
> designer as someone stuck in the last decade?
>
> As usual, I suspect the answer is "it depends"; what I'm really
> interested in is exploring issues around how we present ourselves in
> online presences and the Flash-intro or Flash-site is a method I still
> see from time to time, though not nearly as much as I used to.
>
> Best regards,
> --Alan
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

-- Kim

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
Kim Bieler Graphic Design
www.kbgd.com
www.stargazertees.com
c. 240-476-3129
+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

21 May 2008 - 6:55pm
Michael Wills
2008

It would definately come down to your use of it however. Personally,
the "skip intro" is the first thing i look for.

If you feel it's relevant.. then, however you decide to incorporate
it (intro or part of the site).. make sure it loads quickly.. and
make sure it has purpose. There's nothing wrong with using flash
this way and in the right circumstances it can be quite effective and
useful.. however the whole intro thing is feeling a little (actually,
very) stale. Fluorescent clothing was fashionable once too.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=29277

21 May 2008 - 10:29am
Mario Bourque
2008

Personally, I am not a big fan of Flash intros. Ultimately, it depends on
who your audience is. I like a pdf portfolio that I can print off and take
with me, markup, then follow up with. I, as a client, will not wait long for
Flash intros and will leave if the loading time is taking too long, or if it
is not entirely functional. I was on a site the other day and it took 20
seconds to load their Flash page over an 8Mbps connection. The load time is
a killer. If I were to use Flash, I would have a static page that would link
to various Flash demos/presentations that are more specifically targeted to
a certain topic or project. This will also help reduce load time and file
size.

What you are selling is yourself, so (1) think of how you would like to be
seen by others and (2) picture yourself as the one who is sitting across the
table.

This should be a good thread to follow.

--
Mario Bourque
mariobourque.com / mario at mariobourque.com

On Wed, May 21, 2008 at 9:32 AM, Alan Wexelblat <awexelblat at gmail.com>
wrote:

> Let's assume that you've done the proper work to provide a "Skip
> Intro" button. Let's further assume that you've done at least the
> minimum to make your content accessible to people without the Flash
> player.
>
> The question I ask, then, is: does having a Flash intro to a personal
> site, which may include one's portfolio or resume, make sense in
> today's job market and design environment? Or does this brand the
> designer as someone stuck in the last decade?
>
> As usual, I suspect the answer is "it depends"; what I'm really
> interested in is exploring issues around how we present ourselves in
> online presences and the Flash-intro or Flash-site is a method I still
> see from time to time, though not nearly as much as I used to.
>
> Best regards,
> --Alan
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

22 May 2008 - 7:36am
Sam Woodman
2008

Arrrrgh! No, no and no! I've spent a good many years trying to
convince clients to stop this practice. Even those that insisted on
going with the Flash intro have all let up now.

The basis for a Flash intro is to have a sass between the world wild
web and immersion in the client's brand experience. This is great
for 1.visitors who have the time and 2.first time visitors. We all
know however that most users are an impatient bunch and want to get
to the content they're looking for and beyond the first visit they
will also click on "skip intro".

I agree with one of the comments above aswell: the Flash intro also
often creates disappointment as the user enters into a plain vanilla
web site experience after sitting through the fireworks show.

If you're website is in full Flash, by all means I'd suggest using
a two second intro (not more!) in choreographing the different
elements in the layout. This is intuitive to the user, placing
emphasis on the information you'd like them to see first.

A solution I was involved in with Vuitton a while back was a full
screen Flash intro which lasted a second, then immediately reduced in
size (whilst continuing to play) revealing the other content on the
homepage. What was important here, was that the navigation bars were
always displayed. So for returning visitors, they could click on the
sections without waiting for the animation to finish. Just been to
Vuitton and seen that they've now removed this...

I was also involved in the new Cartier ecommerce website platform-
starting with Japan - www.cartier.jp. They insisted on having a Flash
intro - just wondering how long that will be up for.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=29277

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