[Off-topic] Alarm Clock Recommendations

20 Jun 2008 - 3:20pm
6 years ago
15 replies
1589 reads
jabbett
2008

There was a list discussion a couple years ago about alarm clocks...

http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=5934

...and it made me wonder-- what do usability-sensitive people use for alarm
clocks?

I'm at a point where I'm ready to buy the last alarm clock I'll ever need,
so for argument's sake, let's say money is no object. What's the most
delightful alarm clock experience you've had?

-Jon

Comments

20 Jun 2008 - 7:44pm
Michael Micheletti
2006

I've had a Zen Alarm Clock for some years now:
http://www.now-zen.com/cgi-bin/orders/shop.pl?ACTION=ENTER+SHOP&thispage=zenclocks&AFFILIATE=google73&ORDER_ID=%21ORDERID%21

I love it, but then I'm a left coast tree-hugger from the Pacific
Northwest, your mileage may vary. The tall triangular versions are
better than the little portable ones with the lids IMHO.

Michael Micheletti

On 6/20/08, Jonathan Abbett <jonathan at abbett.org> wrote:
> There was a list discussion a couple years ago about alarm clocks...
>
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=5934
>
> ...and it made me wonder-- what do usability-sensitive people use for alarm
> clocks?
>
> I'm at a point where I'm ready to buy the last alarm clock I'll ever need,
> so for argument's sake, let's say money is no object. What's the most
> delightful alarm clock experience you've had?
>
> -Jon
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

21 Jun 2008 - 7:13am
Todd Moy
2007

I found a "sunrise" alarm clock at a yard sale a few years back. Basically,
it's a clock/lamp that slowly brightens in the minutes leading up to your
awake time. A bit after that, a typical alarm will softly ring and build in
intensity.

It's quite nice since you don't wake up in fight-or-flight response :).
Similar ones can be found by doing a google search for "alarms clocks for
the deaf." Here's an example from HammacherSchlemmer, though not the one I
own: http://tinyurl.com/5x8bwk

Unfortunately, the ones I've seen are quite ugly.

-Todd

On Fri, Jun 20, 2008 at 8:44 PM, Michael Micheletti <
michael.micheletti at gmail.com> wrote:

> I've had a Zen Alarm Clock for some years now:
>
> http://www.now-zen.com/cgi-bin/orders/shop.pl?ACTION=ENTER+SHOP&thispage=zenclocks&AFFILIATE=google73&ORDER_ID=%21ORDERID%21
>
> I love it, but then I'm a left coast tree-hugger from the Pacific
> Northwest, your mileage may vary. The tall triangular versions are
> better than the little portable ones with the lids IMHO.
>
> Michael Micheletti
>
> On 6/20/08, Jonathan Abbett <jonathan at abbett.org> wrote:
> > There was a list discussion a couple years ago about alarm clocks...
> >
> > http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=5934
> >
> > ...and it made me wonder-- what do usability-sensitive people use for
> alarm
> > clocks?
> >
> > I'm at a point where I'm ready to buy the last alarm clock I'll ever
> need,
> > so for argument's sake, let's say money is no object. What's the most
> > delightful alarm clock experience you've had?
> >
> > -Jon
>
>

22 Jun 2008 - 9:23pm
Michael B. Moore
2008

The design of most alarm clocks is so awful it's almost funny. A nice
exception is the Swiss Army travel alarm clock (http://tinyurl.com/52fc46).
It's analog, and both the time and alarm set by twisting a little knob in
the back. One nice design feature is that only the alarm knob is visible
under ordinary circumstances; the time setting knob is concealed by a hinged
plastic cover. So there's no need to try to figure out which knob sets the
alarm. The cover's easy to open though, so when you need to change timezones
it isn't a big deal.
One thing it makes you realize is that you rarely need to-the-minute
accuracy on your wake up time. +/- 5 minutes is fine.

-Michael Moore

On Sat, Jun 21, 2008 at 5:13 AM, Todd Moy <oombrella at gmail.com> wrote:

> I found a "sunrise" alarm clock at a yard sale a few years back. Basically,
> it's a clock/lamp that slowly brightens in the minutes leading up to your
> awake time. A bit after that, a typical alarm will softly ring and build in
> intensity.
>
> It's quite nice since you don't wake up in fight-or-flight response :).
> Similar ones can be found by doing a google search for "alarms clocks for
> the deaf." Here's an example from HammacherSchlemmer, though not the one I
> own: http://tinyurl.com/5x8bwk
>
> Unfortunately, the ones I've seen are quite ugly.
>
> -Todd
>
>
> On Fri, Jun 20, 2008 at 8:44 PM, Michael Micheletti <
> michael.micheletti at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > I've had a Zen Alarm Clock for some years now:
> >
> >
> http://www.now-zen.com/cgi-bin/orders/shop.pl?ACTION=ENTER+SHOP&thispage=zenclocks&AFFILIATE=google73&ORDER_ID=%21ORDERID%21
> >
> > I love it, but then I'm a left coast tree-hugger from the Pacific
> > Northwest, your mileage may vary. The tall triangular versions are
> > better than the little portable ones with the lids IMHO.
> >
> > Michael Micheletti
> >
> > On 6/20/08, Jonathan Abbett <jonathan at abbett.org> wrote:
> > > There was a list discussion a couple years ago about alarm clocks...
> > >
> > > http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=5934
> > >
> > > ...and it made me wonder-- what do usability-sensitive people use for
> > alarm
> > > clocks?
> > >
> > > I'm at a point where I'm ready to buy the last alarm clock I'll ever
> > need,
> > > so for argument's sake, let's say money is no object. What's the most
> > > delightful alarm clock experience you've had?
> > >
> > > -Jon
> >
> >
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
Michael B. Moore • Pure InfoDesign • 415.246.6690 M • www.pureinfodesign.com

23 Jun 2008 - 12:43pm
pnuschke
2007

Good question. I designed one if grad school because I hated mine so much. I
eventually bought this one @ Costco and love it:

http://www.jr.com/sony/pe/SON_ICFC180/

--
Paul Nuschke
Senior Design Researcher
ELECTRONIC INK(c)
www.electronicink.com

On Fri, Jun 20, 2008 at 4:20 PM, Jonathan Abbett <jonathan at abbett.org>
wrote:

> There was a list discussion a couple years ago about alarm clocks...
>
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=5934
>
> ...and it made me wonder-- what do usability-sensitive people use for alarm
> clocks?
>
> I'm at a point where I'm ready to buy the last alarm clock I'll ever need,
> so for argument's sake, let's say money is no object. What's the most
> delightful alarm clock experience you've had?
>
> -Jon
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

23 Jun 2008 - 12:58pm
Suzanne Walsh
2008

A few years ago I splurged on this clock.

http://www.plushpod.com/products/Starck_Smart_Clock-903-61.html

When I first bought it I was afraid that if may be over designed but the feature
I would find hard to give up at this point is the time illuminating on the
ceiling... if you are someone that tosses and turns, like me, you can easily see
what time it is and whether or not you remembered to set the alarm.

http://www.plushpod.com/products/Starck_Smart_Clock-903-61.html

I don't use a lot of the other features and think they would do well by coming up
with a simpler version, but they also don't get in my way...

Good luck,
Suzanne

________________________

Suzanne Walsh
415.519.8767
http://www.suzannewalsh.com

23 Jun 2008 - 3:35pm
Janna DeVylder
2006

It's called iPhone, set with the 'harp' sound.
Quite pleasant, lovely interface... and snooze!

>
> I'm at a point where I'm ready to buy the last alarm clock I'll ever need,
> so for argument's sake, let's say money is no object. What's the most
> delightful alarm clock experience you've had?
>
> -Jon
>

23 Jun 2008 - 3:40pm
SemanticWill
2007

My iPhone is also my alarm but because I awake @ 5, I rarely use it

will evans
user experience architect
wkevans4 at gmail.com
617.281.1281

On Jun 23, 2008, at 4:35 PM, "Janna Hicks DeVylder"
<janna at devylder.com> wrote:

> It's called iPhone, set with the 'harp' sound.
> Quite pleasant, lovely interface... and snooze!
>
>
>
>>
>> I'm at a point where I'm ready to buy the last alarm clock I'll
>> ever need,
>> so for argument's sake, let's say money is no object. What's the
>> most
>> delightful alarm clock experience you've had?
>>
>> -Jon
>>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

23 Jun 2008 - 3:51pm
Bruce Esrig
2006

The sunrise alarm clock is rather wonderful. We have one with a round orb
and a strong white light. We clipped one of the wires inside, so it just
glows for an hour without ringing at all. If you're willing to admit that
it's daytime, it makes waking up a natural experience.

The ultimate user experience is to have no alarm clock. It works if your
internal clock tends to run early, or if you can get yourself to wake up at
some regular time. It might be worth experimenting with. If it works, it
works really well. Once awake, you can pad over to an ordinary un-alarming
clock to find out what time it is.

You might still need an ordinary alarm clock on days when you have to get up
*really* early.

Best wishes,

Bruce

On Sat, Jun 21, 2008 at 8:13 AM, Todd Moy <oombrella at gmail.com> wrote:

> I found a "sunrise" alarm clock at a yard sale a few years back. Basically,
> it's a clock/lamp that slowly brightens in the minutes leading up to your
> awake time. A bit after that, a typical alarm will softly ring and build in
> intensity.
>
> It's quite nice since you don't wake up in fight-or-flight response :).
> Similar ones can be found by doing a google search for "alarms clocks for
> the deaf." Here's an example from HammacherSchlemmer, though not the one I
> own: http://tinyurl.com/5x8bwk
>
> Unfortunately, the ones I've seen are quite ugly.
>
> -Todd
>
>
> On Fri, Jun 20, 2008 at 8:44 PM, Michael Micheletti <
> michael.micheletti at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > I've had a Zen Alarm Clock for some years now:
> >
> >
> http://www.now-zen.com/cgi-bin/orders/shop.pl?ACTION=ENTER+SHOP&thispage=zenclocks&AFFILIATE=google73&ORDER_ID=%21ORDERID%21
> >
> > I love it, but then I'm a left coast tree-hugger from the Pacific
> > Northwest, your mileage may vary. The tall triangular versions are
> > better than the little portable ones with the lids IMHO.
> >
> > Michael Micheletti
> >
> > On 6/20/08, Jonathan Abbett <jonathan at abbett.org> wrote:
> > > There was a list discussion a couple years ago about alarm clocks...
> > >
> > > http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=5934
> > >
> > > ...and it made me wonder-- what do usability-sensitive people use for
> > alarm
> > > clocks?
> > >
> > > I'm at a point where I'm ready to buy the last alarm clock I'll ever
> > need,
> > > so for argument's sake, let's say money is no object. What's the most
> > > delightful alarm clock experience you've had?
> > >
> > > -Jon
> >
> >
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>
>

23 Jun 2008 - 4:01pm
Erik Gibb
2007

I have to sleep with earplugs in to combat a major electric bus line that runs on my street. I bought a Sonic Boom - comes with a vibrating disc you stick between boxspring and mattress. It not only gives the bed a really low dose shake, but is amplified in the boxspring creating a very audible yet pleasant low frequency hum. I'm never shocked awake. It also includes a socket to plug in a lamp, and switches between flashing and solid.

It's ugly as hell, and the lamp switch override is larger than the snooze, but it's relatively difficult to accidentally turn off. I wake up much happier since I bought that thing.

http://tinyurl.com/6mg9sr (no endorsement: just the first link I found for it)

On Monday, June 23, 2008, at 01:52PM, "Bruce Esrig" <esrig-ia at esrig.com> wrote:
>The sunrise alarm clock is rather wonderful. We have one with a round orb
>and a strong white light. We clipped one of the wires inside, so it just
>glows for an hour without ringing at all. If you're willing to admit that
>it's daytime, it makes waking up a natural experience.
>
>The ultimate user experience is to have no alarm clock. It works if your
>internal clock tends to run early, or if you can get yourself to wake up at
>some regular time. It might be worth experimenting with. If it works, it
>works really well. Once awake, you can pad over to an ordinary un-alarming
>clock to find out what time it is.
>
>You might still need an ordinary alarm clock on days when you have to get up
>*really* early.
>
>Best wishes,
>
>Bruce
>
>On Sat, Jun 21, 2008 at 8:13 AM, Todd Moy <oombrella at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> I found a "sunrise" alarm clock at a yard sale a few years back. Basically,
>> it's a clock/lamp that slowly brightens in the minutes leading up to your
>> awake time. A bit after that, a typical alarm will softly ring and build in
>> intensity.
>>
>> It's quite nice since you don't wake up in fight-or-flight response :).
>> Similar ones can be found by doing a google search for "alarms clocks for
>> the deaf." Here's an example from HammacherSchlemmer, though not the one I
>> own: http://tinyurl.com/5x8bwk
>>
>> Unfortunately, the ones I've seen are quite ugly.
>>
>> -Todd
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Jun 20, 2008 at 8:44 PM, Michael Micheletti <
>> michael.micheletti at gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> > I've had a Zen Alarm Clock for some years now:
>> >
>> >
>> http://www.now-zen.com/cgi-bin/orders/shop.pl?ACTION=ENTER+SHOP&thispage=zenclocks&AFFILIATE=google73&ORDER_ID=%21ORDERID%21
>> >
>> > I love it, but then I'm a left coast tree-hugger from the Pacific
>> > Northwest, your mileage may vary. The tall triangular versions are
>> > better than the little portable ones with the lids IMHO.
>> >
>> > Michael Micheletti
>> >
>> > On 6/20/08, Jonathan Abbett <jonathan at abbett.org> wrote:
>> > > There was a list discussion a couple years ago about alarm clocks...
>> > >
>> > > http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=5934
>> > >
>> > > ...and it made me wonder-- what do usability-sensitive people use for
>> > alarm
>> > > clocks?
>> > >
>> > > I'm at a point where I'm ready to buy the last alarm clock I'll ever
>> > need,
>> > > so for argument's sake, let's say money is no object. What's the most
>> > > delightful alarm clock experience you've had?
>> > >
>> > > -Jon
>> >
>> >
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
>>
>________________________________________________________________
>Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>
>

24 Jun 2008 - 6:52pm
Shaun Bergmann
2007

Great timing! As of this week, I'm in the position of designing an
alarm clock -- something I've been dying to do for quite a few years
now.

One of the things I've always craved in my own clock was a slow
ramping of volume from zero to whatever max volume I'd originally
set the alarm to go off at.

The question now is: How long would the ideal ramp be?
I think it should start about 10 or 15 minutes before the
you-must-get-up-now time.

Would the user like to be able to adjust the length of ramp time?

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=30445

24 Jun 2008 - 7:14pm
Katie Albers
2005

Speaking strictly for myself, I am prepared to overlook the phrase
"Great timing", but don't do it again :)

As long as you're designing an alarm clock, why not allow the user to
set the "start noise" time, the "end noise" time and the beginning
and ending volumes?

katie

>Great timing! As of this week, I'm in the position of designing an
>alarm clock -- something I've been dying to do for quite a few years
>now.
>
>One of the things I've always craved in my own clock was a slow
>ramping of volume from zero to whatever max volume I'd originally
>set the alarm to go off at.
>
>The question now is: How long would the ideal ramp be?
>I think it should start about 10 or 15 minutes before the
>you-must-get-up-now time.
>
>Would the user like to be able to adjust the length of ramp time?

--

----------------
Katie Albers
katie at firstthought.com

24 Jun 2008 - 8:28pm
Shaun Bergmann
2007

I caught the inadvertent "Great timing" pun too late... The post had
already left the station.

I'm focusing on providing some elegant features to the functionality of the
alarm that will ease people into their day. The slow ramp is something I've
always wanted. (I haven't quite figured out the foot massage option)
More importantly, however, I want those same people to be able to relax at
the end of their day. If they get home late from a long trip, stumble into
their bedroom and in a half zombie state try to set their alarm for an early
meeting the next morning, I don't want to inundate them with options and
questions.

I can add things to the way the alarm operates to make it more pleasant, but
the biggest failing in just about every alarm clock on the market is the
convoluted method of setting it. (The AM/PM thing for example. That's
always referred to as the user making a mistake in setting it, but it's a
flaw in design that STILL hasn't been overcome)

I don't understand the "end noise" time. As a deep sleeper, I've on
occasion cursed my own alarm clock for turning itself off after a set period
of time. There should be no "end noise" time. The "end noise" time is when
you finally get your lazy butt out of bed and manually -- by choice -- end
the noise.

I agree that some people might find it nice to be able to adjust how long
before the set wake-up time the "ramp from zero" starts, but if it's just
hard-coded at a pre-defined time based on user research, people won't even
notice the choice is missing. I want them to say "oh that's so easy" when
they go to bed, and then say "oh that's so nice" when they wake up.

So, for some informal user research, what do YOU think is a nice period of
time for the slow increase of volume?
Say you set the alarm for 6:00 am, and you've set the max volume for 70%, I
personally think 15 minutes from zero to max is about right..
That's one person.
Please email me or post to the list with what you'd like.

(and yes, I'm still trying to figure out the foot massage option.)

On Tue, Jun 24, 2008 at 5:14 PM, Katie Albers <katie at firstthought.com>
wrote:

> Speaking strictly for myself, I am prepared to overlook the phrase "Great
> timing", but don't do it again :)
>
> As long as you're designing an alarm clock, why not allow the user to set
> the "start noise" time, the "end noise" time and the beginning and ending
> volumes?
>
> katie
>
>
>
> Great timing! As of this week, I'm in the position of designing an
>> alarm clock -- something I've been dying to do for quite a few years
>> now.
>>
>> One of the things I've always craved in my own clock was a slow
>> ramping of volume from zero to whatever max volume I'd originally
>> set the alarm to go off at.
>>
>> The question now is: How long would the ideal ramp be?
>> I think it should start about 10 or 15 minutes before the
>> you-must-get-up-now time.
>>
>> Would the user like to be able to adjust the length of ramp time?
>>
>
> --
>
> ----------------
> Katie Albers
> katie at firstthought.com
>

24 Jun 2008 - 11:47pm
Jack L. Moffett
2005

I wrote about my alarm clock quite some time ago here:
http://designaday.tumblr.com/post/1116463/why-i-have-an-ugly-alarm-clock

So, Shaun, make it really easy to set the time, and make it an
aesthetically pleasing industrial design, and I'm sold.

Jack

Jack L. Moffett
Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

The World is not set up to facilitate the best
any more than it is set up to facilitate the worst.
It doesn't depend on brilliance or innovation
because if it did, the system would be unpredictable.
It requires averages and predictables.

So, good deeds and brilliant ideas go against the
grain of the social contract almost by definition.
They will be challenged and will require
enormous effort to succeed.

Most fail.
- Michael McDonough

25 Jun 2008 - 12:51am
Larry Tesler
2004

My July 2006 wake up call about this alarming topic was documented at:

http://blog.360.yahoo.com/nomodes

Here's the text:

The devolution of a clock

Some time during the 1990's, I purchased a Braun travel alarm
that was a delight to own until it eventually died last year. I
replaced it by a similar-looking Braun travel alarm that I found on
the web site of a Canadian retailer. (Braun no longer sells clocks in
the United States.)

The new model (which is now out of the lineup) has a face light
controlled by a single easy-to-reach bar. The old model had no light.
Advantage new model.

The new model features radio control. If you are lucky, it will
receive a radio signal occasionally that automatically sets the time
accurately, taking seasonal time adjustments into account. More
likely, in my experience, you will have to set it manually by holding
down the Light Bar for about 10 seconds, then keeping it down for up
to a minute until it reaches the current time. If you overshoot, you
need to do it again. On the old model, you simply opened the back and
turned a small wheel in either direction. Advantage old model.

On the new model, when the alarm sounds, you can hit the Light
Bar to "snooze," i.e., to silence the alarm for a few minutes. On the
old model, a proximity sensor allowed you to simply wave your hand
near the clock to make it snooze. The coupling of snooze and light is
clever and useful, but if you'd rather keep your eyes shut when you
need more sleep, you'd prefer the old model.

Both the old and the new models have a knurled wheel on the right
side that is easy to reach when you want to change the alarm time.

On the old model, you could turn the alarm-set wheel either way
to adjust the wake-up time. On the new model, you can turn it only one
way. To wake up ten minutes earlier, you have to nudge it more than
twenty times. If you turn it too far (an easy mistake to make when
you're sleepy), you have to do that again. Major advantage old model.

On the old model, the alarm-set wheel turned silently. On the new
model, it clicks 300 times as you go through the process just
described. Someone at Braun forgot that roommates don't always retire
at the same time. An alarm clock should be perfectly quiet, or at
least emit a soft, constant sound, except at the time you wanted to
wake up. Major advantage old model.

I can't understand why companies that have mastered the art of
friendly design often remove the most user-friendly features of their
products in later models. I can only guess that they aren't conducting
customer research or that they are ignoring the results.

Braun is a great product company but the devolution of their
alarm clock series is a disappointment.

Larry

24 Jun 2008 - 7:18pm
Bonnie E. John
2008

I agree with that a sunrise alarm clock is delightful. Absolutely my
"last alarm clock".

Mine doesn't make any sound and allows any lamp to be plugged into it,
so it is a lovely as the lamp you choose (if you hide the box).

It is a small black box (~3inx5inx2in), with a red digital clock, 6
buttons, and a socket for your lamp. It is easy to set and you can carry
it with you when you travel (except of course, in CA, you also have to
bring an incandescent light bulb as well because hotels can only use
flourescents these days). It also works in reverse -- you press a button
to bring the light up to full brightness and it slowly decreases the
brightness until it is off. I always read in bed and used to wake up
with a start at 3AM after I had fallen asleep with the light on and
suddenly turned over into full light on my face.

My husband gave this to me for a Christmas present last year and
splurged on the one that allows me to set the durations of sunrise and
sunset. The standard duration is 45 minutes (non-programmable in the
cheaper model). He and I both thought that being able to set the
duration would be important. I found that 45 min isn't bad for me, but I
believe I set it to 1 hour for sundown and 30 minutes for sun rise just
because I could. They picked a reasonable default and now that I've used
it for 18 months I don't think I would recommend paying the extra $50.

This one is called the SunUp Indoor Dawn simulator (the SunRizr is the
cheaper one that has a fixed duration).
It is available at http://www.indoorsun.com/Pages/lightingpeople.html

Bonnie

Bruce Esrig wrote:
> The sunrise alarm clock is rather wonderful. We have one with a round orb
> and a strong white light. We clipped one of the wires inside, so it just
> glows for an hour without ringing at all. If you're willing to admit that
> it's daytime, it makes waking up a natural experience.
>
> The ultimate user experience is to have no alarm clock. It works if your
> internal clock tends to run early, or if you can get yourself to wake up at
> some regular time. It might be worth experimenting with. If it works, it
> works really well. Once awake, you can pad over to an ordinary un-alarming
> clock to find out what time it is.
>
> You might still need an ordinary alarm clock on days when you have to get up
> *really* early.
>
> Best wishes,
>
> Bruce
>
> On Sat, Jun 21, 2008 at 8:13 AM, Todd Moy <oombrella at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>> I found a "sunrise" alarm clock at a yard sale a few years back. Basically,
>> it's a clock/lamp that slowly brightens in the minutes leading up to your
>> awake time. A bit after that, a typical alarm will softly ring and build in
>> intensity.
>>
>> It's quite nice since you don't wake up in fight-or-flight response :).
>> Similar ones can be found by doing a google search for "alarms clocks for
>> the deaf." Here's an example from HammacherSchlemmer, though not the one I
>> own: http://tinyurl.com/5x8bwk
>>
>> Unfortunately, the ones I've seen are quite ugly.
>>
>> -Todd
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Jun 20, 2008 at 8:44 PM, Michael Micheletti <
>> michael.micheletti at gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>>> I've had a Zen Alarm Clock for some years now:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>> http://www.now-zen.com/cgi-bin/orders/shop.pl?ACTION=ENTER+SHOP&thispage=zenclocks&AFFILIATE=google73&ORDER_ID=%21ORDERID%21
>>
>>> I love it, but then I'm a left coast tree-hugger from the Pacific
>>> Northwest, your mileage may vary. The tall triangular versions are
>>> better than the little portable ones with the lids IMHO.
>>>
>>> Michael Micheletti
>>>
>>> On 6/20/08, Jonathan Abbett <jonathan at abbett.org> wrote:
>>>
>>>> There was a list discussion a couple years ago about alarm clocks...
>>>>
>>>> http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=5934
>>>>
>>>> ...and it made me wonder-- what do usability-sensitive people use for
>>>>
>>> alarm
>>>
>>>> clocks?
>>>>
>>>> I'm at a point where I'm ready to buy the last alarm clock I'll ever
>>>>
>>> need,
>>>
>>>> so for argument's sake, let's say money is no object. What's the most
>>>> delightful alarm clock experience you've had?
>>>>
>>>> -Jon
>>>>
>>>
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