³ Cellphone, yes! Wallet, yes! Keys, no! ²

24 Oct 2004 - 11:48pm
9 years ago
1 reply
515 reads
Listera
2004

Isn't it better when machines do the dirty work for us homo sapiens:

Smart fabrics make for enhanced living

To make a bag that prevents people forgetting things, Nanda and Cable have
equipped a module with a radio antenna and receiver. The unit is programmed
to listen for signals from radio frequency identification (RFID) tags on
objects like cellphones, keys and wallets.

A sensor module in the bag¹s handle detects when the bag has been picked up,
indicating that the owner might be leaving. This triggers the reader to
check through the objects the computer module has been programmed to look
for. If it does not detect a required item, it uses a voice synthesiser
module in another patch to warn: ³Cellphone, yes! Wallet, yes! Keys, no!²

Nanda and Cable have plans to make to the system smarter. They want to add a
Bluetooth chip so it can connect to the internet through a nearby computer
and automatically download weather reports. Then it would only speak up if
you forgot your umbrella and it was raining. As these add-ons emerge, the
system can be upgraded by simply snapping on new sensors. ³People would add
functionality to their bag, just as they download ring tones for their
phones today,² Bove says

<http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99996553>

I'd love to hear from designers involved in RFID-related projects.

Ziya
Nullius in Verba

Comments

25 Oct 2004 - 4:06am
Adi Tedjasaputra
2004

Hi Ziya,

If you go to the Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia conference in Maryland
next week, please don't forget to hold two or more of the smart bags
containing smart items together in your hand, and you will probably see
some interesting things happening ;)

Adi
http://the2the.com/adi

Listera wrote:

>[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
>Isn't it better when machines do the dirty work for us homo sapiens:
>
>Smart fabrics make for enhanced living
>
>To make a bag that prevents people forgetting things, Nanda and Cable have
>equipped a module with a radio antenna and receiver. The unit is programmed
>to listen for signals from radio frequency identification (RFID) tags on
>objects like cellphones, keys and wallets.
>
>A sensor module in the bag¹s handle detects when the bag has been picked up,
>indicating that the owner might be leaving. This triggers the reader to
>check through the objects the computer module has been programmed to look
>for. If it does not detect a required item, it uses a voice synthesiser
>module in another patch to warn: ³Cellphone, yes! Wallet, yes! Keys, no!²
>
>Nanda and Cable have plans to make to the system smarter. They want to add a
>Bluetooth chip so it can connect to the internet through a nearby computer
>and automatically download weather reports. Then it would only speak up if
>you forgot your umbrella and it was raining. As these add-ons emerge, the
>system can be upgraded by simply snapping on new sensors. ³People would add
>functionality to their bag, just as they download ring tones for their
>phones today,² Bove says
>
><http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99996553>
>
>I'd love to hear from designers involved in RFID-related projects.
>
>Ziya
>Nullius in Verba
>
>
>
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