Q: Soliciting client testimonials

12 Aug 2008 - 5:22pm
6 years ago
3 replies
804 reads
kimbieler
2007

I'm doing a website overhaul (rebranding, everything) and I would like
to incorporate client testimonials.

I don't want to ghost write these things but I know that many people
hate to write and wouldn't know what to say, even if they wanted to
say something nice, so I'm thinking about giving them some questions
to nudge them in the right direction. Such as:

- Did we finish the job on time and within budget?
- Did the project meet or exceed your expectations?
- How would you describe the working relationship?
- Would you hire us again?
- Would you recommend us to a colleague?

...that kind of thing. Any suggestions or advice?

Thanks!

-- Kim

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
Kim Bieler Graphic Design
www.kbgd.com
Office: 301-588-8555
Mobile: 240-476-3129
+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

Comments

13 Aug 2008 - 7:23am
Alan James Salmoni
2008

Grab a tape recorder and chat to some people who know how well you did
the job. You should be able to get some choice quotes that way. It's
always harder to write something than say it, and this might be a way
around. I would start with an unrelated question or two just to get
them started, and then ask them "so, overall, what did you think of
my work?". This works even better for telephone conversations - just
remember to ask their permission to quote them as a testimonial,
though this can be done after the conversation.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=31964

12 Aug 2008 - 9:56pm
Anonymous

Testimonials are a little hard to take seriously in my opinion. They
do, however, grab my attention when something unique is said from
someone who matters.

The testimonial on http://www.stuffandnonsense.co.uk is a great
example.

You might try giving them no guidelines at all. Maybe doing so will
be unexpected and will result in more candid and relevant results.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=31964

13 Aug 2008 - 9:58am
Sterling Koch
2008

I agree. For those of us who spend enough time on the web to become generally jaded, testimonials are usually assumed to be fake. That being said, the ones that matter are short (usually one sentence focused on one aspect of your service) and have a real name and/or company attach that can be found elsewhere (i.e. a link to their website).

----- Original Message ----
From: Steve <stevedossett at live.com>
To: discuss at ixda.org
Sent: Tuesday, August 12, 2008 7:56:18 PM
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Q: Soliciting client testimonials

Testimonials are a little hard to take seriously in my opinion. They
do, however, grab my attention when something unique is said from
someone who matters.

The testimonial on http://www.stuffandnonsense.co.uk is a great
example.

You might try giving them no guidelines at all. Maybe doing so will
be unexpected and will result in more candid and relevant results.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=31964

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