Felt boards

3 Oct 2008 - 1:14pm
5 years ago
7 replies
1025 reads
Shaun Bergmann
2007

In the initial stages of brainstorming design, specifically when it comes to
reactive changes to the interface, I'm commonly sketching boxes and buttons
on graph paper or a white board.

Then I started thinking about the playroom I had as a child, and we had a
big felt board down there with a large box of various different colours of
felt dogs, flowers, birds, trees etc. Just put the little felt character on
the board and it would stick.
I'm thinking this old-school toy would actually work really well in place of
a white board, when you are quickly trying to demonstrate how things will
layout and change according to system state.

Has anybody seen this in use? Any experience with it?
Or have I finally lost my mind?
Shaun

Comments

3 Oct 2008 - 2:41pm
Loren Baxter
2007

This site sells fridge magnets made to look like GUI controls:
http://www.guimagnets.com/

It would be really fun to create your own shapes, maybe using huge sticky
notes: http://store.heliotropehome.com/gistnopad.html

-Loren

-----
http://acleandesign.com

On Fri, Oct 3, 2008 at 11:14 AM, Shaun Bergmann <shaunbergmann at gmail.com>wrote:

> In the initial stages of brainstorming design, specifically when it comes
> to
> reactive changes to the interface, I'm commonly sketching boxes and buttons
> on graph paper or a white board.
>
> Then I started thinking about the playroom I had as a child, and we had a
> big felt board down there with a large box of various different colours of
> felt dogs, flowers, birds, trees etc. Just put the little felt character
> on
> the board and it would stick.
> I'm thinking this old-school toy would actually work really well in place
> of
> a white board, when you are quickly trying to demonstrate how things will
> layout and change according to system state.
>
> Has anybody seen this in use? Any experience with it?
> Or have I finally lost my mind?
> Shaun
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
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3 Oct 2008 - 2:44pm
Mark Schraad
2006

For me, the modern version is any relatively clean surface within
reach and a bunch of sticky notes. COmbining stickies with a white
board works really well also.

Mark

On Fri, Oct 3, 2008 at 2:14 PM, Shaun Bergmann <shaunbergmann at gmail.com> wrote:
> In the initial stages of brainstorming design, specifically when it comes to
> reactive changes to the interface, I'm commonly sketching boxes and buttons
> on graph paper or a white board.
>
> Then I started thinking about the playroom I had as a child, and we had a
> big felt board down there with a large box of various different colours of
> felt dogs, flowers, birds, trees etc. Just put the little felt character on
> the board and it would stick.
> I'm thinking this old-school toy would actually work really well in place of
> a white board, when you are quickly trying to demonstrate how things will
> layout and change according to system state.
>
> Has anybody seen this in use? Any experience with it?
> Or have I finally lost my mind?
> Shaun
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

4 Oct 2008 - 1:58am
Troy Gardner
2008

we use the guimagnets at times, but have gone to something similar, magnetic
whiteboards with cuttable magnetic film, we've created all sorts of shapes
with scissors. But we use 4x3 papersheet sized ones for screens so we can
insert new ones, move them around, these can be stacked.
http://www.magnetking.com/#dryerasemagnet

Sadly the guimagnets don't stick to the magnetic film and the whiteboard so
can't be combined. And not all whiteboards are magnetic.

4 Oct 2008 - 6:44am
Itamar Medeiros
2006

Sticky notes seem to be a good alternative. There are a lot of
templates using sticky notes to support graphic facilitation
developed by The Grove (http://www.grove.com/site/index.html)

...
{ Itamar Medeiros } Information Designer
designing clear, understandable communication by
caring to structure, context, and presentation
of data and information

mobile ::: 86 13671503252
website ::: http://designative.info/
aim ::: itamarlmedeiros
skype ::: designative

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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4 Oct 2008 - 7:27am
Rob Tannen
2006

Shaun - You're not out of your mind. Designers and design
researchers have been usng felt boards and similar materials for
years. Best example is Liz Sanders co-creation methods, where
participants use such materials to envision designs of products and
environments (see esp. page 8-11):

http://www.maketools.com/pdfs/CoCreation_Sanders_Stappers_08_preprint.pdf

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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4 Oct 2008 - 10:24am
Chauncey Wilson
2007

You can buy magnetic sheets and print out whatever you want at most of
the large office supply stores in the USA (Staples and similar
stores). They are useful for things like information architecture,
menu design, and brainstorming. The same stores now sell 100 magnets
in business card size and you can stick labels on those if you are
using words or very simple symbols. The magnet sheets recommend that
you don't put them through a laser printer - inkjet only on the ones
that I've used. There are a number of studies using magnets and
stick-ons. The FIDO study by Tom Tullis and colleagues is a good
example of the use of magents in design.

http://www.bentley.edu/events/agingbydesign2004/presentations/tedesco_chadwickdias_tullis_fido.pdf

You can create nice flow diagrams with a whiteboard and magnet symbols
(supplemented with stickies).

Chauncey

On Sat, Oct 4, 2008 at 8:27 AM, Rob Tannen <rtannen at bresslergroup.com> wrote:
> Shaun - You're not out of your mind. Designers and design
> researchers have been usng felt boards and similar materials for
> years. Best example is Liz Sanders co-creation methods, where
> participants use such materials to envision designs of products and
> environments (see esp. page 8-11):
>
> http://www.maketools.com/pdfs/CoCreation_Sanders_Stappers_08_preprint.pdf
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=33836
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

4 Oct 2008 - 11:41am
jet
2008

About 10 years ago when I was making my own magnets, "blank" fridge
magnets were much cheaper at craft stores than at office supply stores
and there was a wider range of sizes/shapes.

Chauncey Wilson wrote:
> You can buy magnetic sheets and print out whatever you want at most of
> the large office supply stores in the USA (Staples and similar
> stores). They are useful for things like information architecture,
> menu design, and brainstorming. The same stores now sell 100 magnets
> in business card size and you can stick labels on those if you are
> using words or very simple symbols. The magnet sheets recommend that
> you don't put them through a laser printer - inkjet only on the ones
> that I've used. There are a number of studies using magnets and
> stick-ons. The FIDO study by Tom Tullis and colleagues is a good
> example of the use of magents in design.
>
> http://www.bentley.edu/events/agingbydesign2004/presentations/tedesco_chadwickdias_tullis_fido.pdf
>
> You can create nice flow diagrams with a whiteboard and magnet symbols
> (supplemented with stickies).
>
> Chauncey
>
> On Sat, Oct 4, 2008 at 8:27 AM, Rob Tannen <rtannen at bresslergroup.com> wrote:
>> Shaun - You're not out of your mind. Designers and design
>> researchers have been usng felt boards and similar materials for
>> years. Best example is Liz Sanders co-creation methods, where
>> participants use such materials to envision designs of products and
>> environments (see esp. page 8-11):
>>
>> http://www.maketools.com/pdfs/CoCreation_Sanders_Stappers_08_preprint.pdf
>>
>>
>> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
>> Posted from the new ixda.org
>> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=33836
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

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