Design Research: Practice noticing stuff and telling stories

25 Oct 2008 - 7:10am
5 years ago
28 replies
1534 reads
SemanticWill
2007

A while back, there were discussions about design research and inspiration.
Steve Portigal has a good little article in Core77 called "Design Research:
Practice noticing stuff and telling stories,"
http://www.core77.com/hack2school/portigal.asp

"To be a better design researcher, hone your ability to observe the world
around you. Keep a regular log that you add to at least weekly (daily would
be ideal). Document the strange, the curious, the weird, the awesome and the
funny. Learn to keep a close eye on the artifacts, signs, designs,
behaviors, products and experiences that you encounter in your everyday
life.

Put your observations on the Internet. Maybe no one will see them, but the
discipline of taking your observations out of your own head and publishing
them in a sharable form will force you into telling a story. As much as
design research is about observing others, there's something very personal
about how and what we see, and developing that voice will serve you well.
Collect stories and retell them in your own way, emphasizing the perspective
you want others to take away."

Does anyone have a 'suitcase' where the stick stuff they find? I know some
of us may use flickr, del.icio.us or other means of collecting inspiration.
Moleskin? How do you record your observations and remember where you got
inspriration from? I know this is one possible use for @zakiwarfel's
research framework which can of course be used for user research/testing but
can also be used for book writing and design research. Anyone have a formal
process/framework out there?

--
~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | User Experience Architect
tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
aim: semanticwill
gtalk: semanticwill
twitter: semanticwill
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Comments

25 Oct 2008 - 5:15pm
jet
2008

Will Evans wrote:
> Does anyone have a 'suitcase' where the stick stuff they find?

When I was taking undergraduate design classes, this was called a
"sketchbook".

:-)

As much as I like the computers and tah wehbs, I still prefer working
with tangible objects. Lately if I see something online that I like I
print it out and paste it in. I've also started carrying StudioTac (or
some other double-sided tacky stuff) in my sketchbook so I can swipe
things in the field.

On the mac, I've been experimenting with Yojimbo for URLs to papers and
to index papers that I've downloaded. I've been trying Scrivener for
outlining and writing, my brain is so wired for emacs/TeX that it's hard
to break my old workflow of ascii-notes-to-final-draft.

--
J. Eric "jet" Townsend, CMU Master of Tangible Interaction Design '09

design: www.allartburns.org; hacking: www.flatline.net; HF: KG6ZVQ
PGP: 0xD0D8C2E8 AC9B 0A23 C61A 1B4A 27C5 F799 A681 3C11 D0D8 C2E8

26 Oct 2008 - 5:20am
Andy Polaine
2008

I have 33 notebooks going all the way back to my university days when
I first started numbering them - these days they're mostly Moleskines
or Miquel Rius ones (if I can my hands on them). It's not a terribly
formal process though. They switch from being notebooks to journals to
sketches to "remember the milk". But I like the mix because it's a
more honest record of things.

I use Flickr and my blog for a great deal of stuff. It makes it handy
when teaching or searching for things. I like to think of it as my
extended memory (because I can't even remember my own mobile phone
number these days of having stuff programmed in).

Best,

Andy

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Andy Polaine

Research | Writing | Strategy
Interaction Concept Design
Education Futures

Twitter: apolaine
Skype: apolaine

http://playpen.polaine.com
http://www.designersreviewofbooks.com
http://www.omnium.net.au
http://www.antirom.com

26 Oct 2008 - 6:31am
Steve Baty
2009

Will,

I use a combination of delicious, evernote, and Moleskin notebooks. There's
nothing formal or disciplined about it; and I've only really started doing
it consistently in the past couple of years.

Cheers
Steve

2008/10/25 Will Evans <will at semanticfoundry.com>

> Does anyone have a 'suitcase' where the stick stuff they find? I know some
> of us may use flickr, del.icio.us or other means of collecting
> inspiration.
> Moleskin? How do you record your observations and remember where you got
> inspriration from? I know this is one possible use for @zakiwarfel's
> research framework which can of course be used for user research/testing
> but
> can also be used for book writing and design research. Anyone have a formal
> process/framework out there?
>
--
----------------------------------------------
Steve 'Doc' Baty B.Sc (Maths), M.EC, MBA
Principal Consultant
Meld Consulting
M: +61 417 061 292
E: stevebaty at meld.com.au
Twitter: docbaty

Blog: http://docholdsfourth.blogspot.com
Contributor - UXMatters - www.uxmatters.com

26 Oct 2008 - 6:48am
SemanticWill
2007

Thanks for the great ideas and contributions so far. I actually have a point
is asking this of the community - so I would love to get more input from
others -

Is there a need/desire for an online, shared portfolio service: semi-private
with granular control over who sees what - where you can store
ideas/articles/inspirations/notes/sketches/portfolio and allow access to
only certain parts. this would be located in the cloud or in the context of
a community. just wondering.

On Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 7:31 AM, Steve Baty <stevebaty at gmail.com> wrote:

> Will,
>
> I use a combination of delicious, evernote, and Moleskin notebooks. There's
> nothing formal or disciplined about it; and I've only really started doing
> it consistently in the past couple of years.
>
> Cheers
> Steve
>
>
--
~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | User Experience Architect
tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
aim: semanticwill
gtalk: semanticwill
twitter: semanticwill
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

26 Oct 2008 - 6:50am
Pieter Jansegers
2008

I'm mainly using Twitter, Tumblr and babl.nl at this moment.

Next to a paper notebook for more fuzzy ideas.

I've learned not to keep all of my notes and urls in just one single
place...

FavoritesAnywhere.com's disappearance, Murl.com's crash and mybookmarks.com's
reset have learned me this lesson the hard way ...

Currently I've lost 40 websites at eduinfo.com...

But I've still some 40 other ones left...

My advice:
Diversify to insure the survival of your notes and urls.

Pieter Jansegers
http://jansegers.tumblr.com

On Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 12:31 PM, Steve Baty <stevebaty at gmail.com> wrote:

> Will,
>
> I use a combination of delicious, evernote, and Moleskin notebooks. There's
> nothing formal or disciplined about it; and I've only really started doing
> it consistently in the past couple of years.
>
> Cheers
> Steve
>
> 2008/10/25 Will Evans <will at semanticfoundry.com>
>
> > Does anyone have a 'suitcase' where the stick stuff they find? I know
> some
> > of us may use flickr, del.icio.us or other means of collecting
> > inspiration.
> > Moleskin? How do you record your observations and remember where you got
> > inspriration from? I know this is one possible use for @zakiwarfel's
> > research framework which can of course be used for user research/testing
> > but
> > can also be used for book writing and design research. Anyone have a
> formal
> > process/framework out there?
> >
> --
> ----------------------------------------------
> Steve 'Doc' Baty B.Sc (Maths), M.EC, MBA
> Principal Consultant
> Meld Consulting
> M: +61 417 061 292
> E: stevebaty at meld.com.au
> Twitter: docbaty
>
> Blog: http://docholdsfourth.blogspot.com
> Contributor - UXMatters - www.uxmatters.com
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

26 Oct 2008 - 7:14am
Andy Polaine
2008

> Is there a need/desire for an online, shared portfolio service: semi-
> private with granular control over who sees what - where you can
> store ideas/articles/inspirations/notes/sketches/portfolio and allow
> access to only certain parts. this would be located in the cloud or
> in the context of
> a community. just wondering.

For me – and I suspect quite a few people here who also have the
technical/design skills – this would be my own website and server
combined with something like Basecamp.

I'm with Pieter in that I like to have stuff stored all over the place
so that I'm not reliant on one service/site. Google is about the only
place I trust not to go bankrupt anytime soon. (Trust in what they do
with the data is, of course, another issue).

Best,

Andy

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Andy Polaine

Research | Writing | Strategy
Interaction Concept Design
Education Futures

Twitter: apolaine
Skype: apolaine

http://playpen.polaine.com
http://www.designersreviewofbooks.com
http://www.omnium.net.au
http://www.antirom.com

26 Oct 2008 - 7:34am
Steve Baty
2009

I would make mention of two points by way of requirements for such a system:
* it should be as immediate as flipping open a sketchbook; or that should at
least be your aim. So MMS integration; twitter integration; photo-blogging
etc
* it should replicate down to my local machine a la MobileMe. This service
needs to be persistent, and that means I need a copy of it that I can reach
at any time.

2008/10/26 Andy Polaine <apolaine at gmail.com>

>
> I'm with Pieter in that I like to have stuff stored all over the place so
> that I'm not reliant on one service/site. Google is about the only place I
> trust not to go bankrupt anytime soon. (Trust in what they do with the data
> is, of course, another issue)

----------------------------------------------
Steve 'Doc' Baty B.Sc (Maths), M.EC, MBA
Principal Consultant
Meld Consulting
M: +61 417 061 292
E: stevebaty at meld.com.au
Twitter: docbaty

Blog: http://docholdsfourth.blogspot.com
Contributor - UXMatters - www.uxmatters.com

26 Oct 2008 - 7:37am
SemanticWill
2007

Looks like we are tribe-sourcing a requirements document, doesn't it :-)

On Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 8:34 AM, Steve Baty <stevebaty at gmail.com> wrote:

> I would make mention of two points by way of requirements for such a
> system:
> * it should be as immediate as flipping open a sketchbook; or that should
> at
> least be your aim. So MMS integration; twitter integration; photo-blogging
> etc
> * it should replicate down to my local machine a la MobileMe. This service
> needs to be persistent, and that means I need a copy of it that I can reach
> at any time.
>
> 2008/10/26 Andy Polaine <apolaine at gmail.com>
>
>
>

--
~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | User Experience Architect
tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
aim: semanticwill
gtalk: semanticwill
twitter: semanticwill
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

26 Oct 2008 - 9:40am
SemanticWill
2007

Also -

Is anyone using http://www.coroflot.com/ for their portfolios? Do they find
it actually works for them?

Just wondering.

On Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 7:48 AM, Will Evans <will at semanticfoundry.com>wrote:

> Thanks for the great ideas and contributions so far. I actually have a
> point is asking this of the community - so I would love to get more input
> from others -
>
> Is there a need/desire for an online, shared portfolio service:
> semi-private with granular control over who sees what - where you can store
> ideas/articles/inspirations/notes/sketches/portfolio and allow access to
> only certain parts. this would be located in the cloud or in the context of
> a community. just wondering.
>
> On Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 7:31 AM, Steve Baty <stevebaty at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Will,
>>
>> I use a combination of delicious, evernote, and Moleskin notebooks.
>> There's
>> nothing formal or disciplined about it; and I've only really started doing
>> it consistently in the past couple of years.
>>
>> Cheers
>> Steve
>>
>>
> --
> ~ will
>
> "Where you innovate, how you innovate,
> and what you innovate are design problems"
>
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Will Evans | User Experience Architect
> tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
> aim: semanticwill
> gtalk: semanticwill
> twitter: semanticwill
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>

--
~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | User Experience Architect
tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
aim: semanticwill
gtalk: semanticwill
twitter: semanticwill
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

26 Oct 2008 - 11:03am
Matt Nish-Lapidus
2007

i tend to use a soft cover moleskine (one of the thin ones) because
it's easy to carry everywhere. i alternate between blank paper and
grid paper versions... that's where i write all my ideas, sketch,
make to-do lists.. all sorts of stuff.

then, when i have an idea that i want to easily reference i'll
transfer/refine my notes into evernote. i like evernote because i can
access it online, on my iphone, and on my computer. it also keeps
copies of everything offline so i don't need to worry about wi-fi or
service outages.

for photos i use flickr, but more personally than for design stuff. ..
i also use delicous for all my bookmarks, although i find i rarely go
back to it.. just the act of saving something there tends to make me
remember it.

as for portfolio.. i actually don't even have one right now, but i'm
about to set one up this afternoon.. and it will live on my personal
webserver.

On Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 7:48 AM, Will Evans <will at semanticfoundry.com> wrote:
> Thanks for the great ideas and contributions so far. I actually have a point
> is asking this of the community - so I would love to get more input from
> others -
>
> Is there a need/desire for an online, shared portfolio service: semi-private
> with granular control over who sees what - where you can store
> ideas/articles/inspirations/notes/sketches/portfolio and allow access to
> only certain parts. this would be located in the cloud or in the context of
> a community. just wondering.
>
> On Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 7:31 AM, Steve Baty <stevebaty at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Will,
>>
>> I use a combination of delicious, evernote, and Moleskin notebooks. There's
>> nothing formal or disciplined about it; and I've only really started doing
>> it consistently in the past couple of years.
>>
>> Cheers
>> Steve
>>
>>
> --
> ~ will
>
> "Where you innovate, how you innovate,
> and what you innovate are design problems"
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Will Evans | User Experience Architect
> tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
> aim: semanticwill
> gtalk: semanticwill
> twitter: semanticwill
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
Matt Nish-Lapidus
--
personal: mattnl at gmail.com
twitter: emenel

26 Oct 2008 - 11:09am
Matt Nish-Lapidus
2007

One thing I really don't like about coroflot is how the term
"interaction design" just means anything interactive.. most people who
tag themselves with interaction design there have done a few websites
or flash.. kind of misleading if you're actually looking for IxD work

On Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 10:40 AM, Will Evans <will at semanticfoundry.com> wrote:
> Also -
>
> Is anyone using http://www.coroflot.com/ for their portfolios? Do they find
> it actually works for them?
>
> Just wondering.
>

--
Matt Nish-Lapidus
--
personal: mattnl at gmail.com
twitter: emenel

26 Oct 2008 - 3:52pm
Jeff Howard
2004

I keep notes in a small gridded Moleskin notebook. But more important
is simply having something to write with. Always. In a pinch I'll
jot down observations on the back of my hand between the thumb and
index finger. I never knew you could write there until I saw the
movie Memento, but it's a really nice affordance.

The only "formal" process I have for non-project related research
is collecting local papers when I travel. Helps to see the world
though a different set of eyes.

// jeff

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34828

26 Oct 2008 - 7:14pm
Robert Racadio
2008

On Sat, Oct 25, 2008 at 5:10 AM, Will Evans <will at semanticfoundry.com>wrote:

> <http://www.core77.com/hack2school/portigal.asp>
> Put your observations on the Internet. Maybe no one will see them, but the
> discipline of taking your observations out of your own head and publishing
> them in a sharable form will force you into telling a story. As much as
> design research is about observing others, there's something very personal
> about how and what we see, and developing that voice will serve you well.
> Collect stories and retell them in your own way, emphasizing the
> perspective
> you want others to take away."

This topic reminds me a lot of an article on Russel Davies's site: How to be
Interesting<http://russelldavies.typepad.com/planning/2006/11/how_to_be_inter.html>.
There, he talks about how observing, creating, and sharing are all keys to
becoming more interesting people.

Does anyone have a 'suitcase' where the stick stuff they find? I know some
> of us may use flickr, del.icio.us or other means of collecting
> inspiration.
> Moleskin? How do you record your observations and remember where you got
> inspriration from? I know this is one possible use for @zakiwarfel's
> research framework which can of course be used for user research/testing
> but
> can also be used for book writing and design research. Anyone have a formal
> process/framework out there?
> <http://www.ixda.org/help>
>
For myself, I use a combination of things to store ideas. Instead of
bookmarking with delicious, I use ma.gnolia. As much as possible, I only
bookmark higher level sites than specific individual articles. For those, I
send to DEVONthink to catalog and categorize.

Flickr I use for photo collections, Tumblr I use for single photos, videos,
and snippets of overheard conversations, and I send text messages to Twitter
to remember one or two-sentence ideas.

For more in-depth brainstorming, I do more stream-of-consciousness capturing
into a moleskine.

It is certainly a lot of services, but because each one fills a very
specific niche, I have no trouble keeping the discipline to use each one.

Best,

Robert

27 Oct 2008 - 8:11am
Andy Polaine
2008

I forgot to mention I also use both Leap and Yep to store and browse
the 2.5GB of PDFs and other docs in my reference library. I've tried
DEVONThink a few times and found it good, but not really suited to the
way I work.

Best,

Andy

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Andy Polaine

Research | Writing | Strategy
Interaction Concept Design
Education Futures

Twitter: apolaine
Skype: apolaine

http://playpen.polaine.com
http://www.designersreviewofbooks.com
http://www.omnium.net.au
http://www.antirom.com

27 Oct 2008 - 7:36am
Anonymous

i'm a fan of moleskins and have been carrying around some form of
physical notebook since i was 14. numbered and catalogged, therye
great to flip through years later for reference but prove auful as
far as being any cohesive form of organization. i recently started
posted somewhat religously to a completely unknown blog of my own for
more public and comical observations as will initially described but i
havent been able to convince myself that tagging is essential and the
frequency of posts is sporadic as i enjoy the tangible act of
writing.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34828

27 Oct 2008 - 9:54am
Ian Chan
2005

I hadn't even thought of the back of the hand -- that's great. I once
had both my thumbs broken at the same time and walked about with both
arms in casts -- had I been so inclined, they might have made for a
great note-taking device, and a semi-public one at that. In fact the
history of writing on the body is long indeed. (some argue that
writing itself began with ritual practices of a violent "graphism"
excercised during rites of passage and similar ceremonies...)

But seriously tho, I like to draft thoughts within blogger some times
-- I find that using blogger even to take notes puts me in a narrative
mind set.

a

On Oct 26, 2008, at 1:52 PM, Jeff Howard wrote:

> I keep notes in a small gridded Moleskin notebook. But more important
> is simply having something to write with. Always. In a pinch I'll
> jot down observations on the back of my hand between the thumb and
> index finger. I never knew you could write there until I saw the
> movie Memento, but it's a really nice affordance.
>
> The only "formal" process I have for non-project related research
> is collecting local papers when I travel. Helps to see the world
> though a different set of eyes.
>
> // jeff
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34828
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

cheers,

adrian chan

415 516 4442
Social Interaction Design (www.gravity7.com)
Sr Fellow, Society for New Communications Research (www.SNCR.org)
LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com/in/adrianchan)

27 Oct 2008 - 9:37am
Erik van de Wiel
2008

I believe there is a big problem with many tools available when it
comes to storing your inspiration. It might take a week, month or
even a couple of years but in the end you%u2019ll end up losing most
of the context and reasons why you saved a piece of inspiration in
the first place. No matter if you use a dummy/sketchbook, Flickr,
delicious or even a .txt file on your desktop, it takes a lot of
effort to organize your inspiration in a way that you can keep track
of it later on.

Together with two fellow Interaction Designers we made a project
called PEF (Alpha working title). PEF is mainly a documentation tool
for designers to visually document a design (or inspiration) without
much breaking into your workflow. Reading the posts in this threat
(and some other recent posts you wrote about personas) I%u2019m very
interested to hear your opinion about our current Alpha version of
the app.

Posted a demo video on Vimeo: http://www.vimeo.com/1786174
Although we%u2019ve used data driven personas, the video is mostly
about what the app can do at this moment instead of who can use it
and why (new video coming soon after the first beta release).

We wrote some more info on: www.deMonsters.com/PEF

As I said before I%u2019m very interested in your and other
people%u2019s thoughts.

Erik van de Wiel

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34828

27 Oct 2008 - 9:58am
SemanticWill
2007

Does anyone use their iPhone/mobile device to send notes to themselves? How
about refer back to their ideas that the posted to Twitter to follow up -
with images attached? Just trying to get a feel for all the ways we keep
track of the constant assault on our senses, how we process, store, and
return to those inspirations, thoughts, ideas.

On Mon, Oct 27, 2008 at 10:54 AM, adrian chan <adrian at gravity7.com> wrote:

> I hadn't even thought of the back of the hand -- that's great. I once had
> both my thumbs broken at the same time and walked about with both arms in
> casts -- had I been so inclined, they might have made for a great
> note-taking device, and a semi-public one at that. In fact the history of
> writing on the body is long indeed. (some argue that writing itself began
> with ritual practices of a violent "graphism" excercised during rites of
> passage and similar ceremonies...)
>
> But seriously tho, I like to draft thoughts within blogger some times -- I
> find that using blogger even to take notes puts me in a narrative mind set.
>
> a
>
>
>
>
> On Oct 26, 2008, at 1:52 PM, Jeff Howard wrote:
>
> I keep notes in a small gridded Moleskin notebook. But more important
>> is simply having something to write with. Always. In a pinch I'll
>> jot down observations on the back of my hand between the thumb and
>> index finger. I never knew you could write there until I saw the
>> movie Memento, but it's a really nice affordance.
>>
>> The only "formal" process I have for non-project related research
>> is collecting local papers when I travel. Helps to see the world
>> though a different set of eyes.
>>
>> // jeff
>>
>>
>> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
>> Posted from the new ixda.org
>> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34828
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
>
>
> cheers,
>
> adrian chan
>
> 415 516 4442
> Social Interaction Design (www.gravity7.com)
> Sr Fellow, Society for New Communications Research (www.SNCR.org)
> LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com/in/adrianchan)
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | User Experience Architect
tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
aim: semanticwill
gtalk: semanticwill
twitter: semanticwill
skype: semanticwill
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

27 Oct 2008 - 9:59am
Michael Micheletti
2006

Hi Will,

I'm an AIGA member, and they have a reciprocity agreement of some kind with
Coroflot, so my AIGA portfolio appears there too. Here's a link if you're
curious:
http://www.coroflot.com/public/individual_details.asp?job_seeker_id=181978&t=&name=micheletti&sort_by=1&&page_no=&c=1

Recruiters do seem to pay attention to AIGA and Coroflot portfolios. I
almost always hear from interesting people after I put a new picture up,
even if it's from my volunteer work. I've long wondered if AIGA's membership
dues make members more interesting to hiring managers.

On your original question - I'm something of a compulsive doodler in
Moleskine sketchbooks, to the point where my journeys off in strange
directions can become a bit distracting to whoever is sitting next to me. I
can't honestly say I can really draw yet, but I keep working away at it.

Michael Micheletti

On Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 7:40 AM, Will Evans <will at semanticfoundry.com>wrote:

> Also -
>
> Is anyone using http://www.coroflot.com/ for their portfolios? Do they
> find
> it actually works for them?
>
> <snip...>

27 Oct 2008 - 10:09am
Jack L. Moffett
2005

On Oct 27, 2008, at 10:58 AM, Will Evans wrote:

> Does anyone use their iPhone/mobile device to send notes to
> themselves?

I use 37 Signals' Tada-List to record ideas for blog posts. They have
an iPhone-optimized version that I use when out and about.

Jack L. Moffett
Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

Some men see things as they are and say "why?"
I dream of things that never were and say "why not?"

- George Bernard
Shaw

27 Oct 2008 - 10:11am
Eva Kaniasty
2007

I have started using my iphone this way. I use the Unote (younote?)
application to basically jot down random thoughts. I have a lot of these
while driving for some reason, and if I don't write them down they
evaporate. The key advantage of the iphone is that I always have it with
me, unlike a notebook, and it allows me to record notes in a number of ways
(write it down, audio, photos, etc.). I think it would be useful to be
able to sync things from the iphone to a web interface, but knowing what I
know about user research, just because I say that doesn't mean I would
actually make the effort to take it one step further to manage stuff
online.

Eva Kaniasty
http://www.linkedin.com/in/kaniasty

On Mon, Oct 27, 2008 at 10:58 AM, Will Evans <will at semanticfoundry.com>wrote:

> Does anyone use their iPhone/mobile device to send notes to themselves?
>

27 Oct 2008 - 10:14am
SemanticWill
2007

On that same note - does anyone email themselves notes to GooToDo? They have
a nice way of emailing yourself todo's - but the same could be done for
ideas - anyone using that tool as well?

On Mon, Oct 27, 2008 at 11:09 AM, Jack Moffett <jackmoffett at mac.com> wrote:

>
> On Oct 27, 2008, at 10:58 AM, Will Evans wrote:
>
> Does anyone use their iPhone/mobile device to send notes to themselves?
>>
>
>
> I use 37 Signals' Tada-List to record ideas for blog posts. They have an
> iPhone-optimized version that I use when out and about.
>
>
>
> Jack L. Moffett
> Interaction Designer
> inmedius
> 412.459.0310 x219
> http://www.inmedius.com
>
>
> Some men see things as they are and say "why?"
> I dream of things that never were and say "why not?"
>
> - George Bernard Shaw
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | User Experience Architect
tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
aim: semanticwill
gtalk: semanticwill
twitter: semanticwill
skype: semanticwill
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

27 Oct 2008 - 2:19pm
Ian Chan
2005

I have been leaving myself voice mails for 15 years for exactly this
purpose -- it works best as a way of synthesizing one's thoughts
because of course you dont want to leave too long a vmail (knowing
that you'll have to listen to it later ;-0). I also take long showers
and talk to myself while showering, tho i haven't sought after any
kind of showerproof writing or recording technologies. And in the
interest of full disclosure, when leaving myself a voicemail I do end
with "cheers man" and then feel utterly compromised for an instant as
I realize how easy it is to enter the mode/context of any
communication tool...

At the moment I have 20 or so windows open in Bbedit each containing
notes on a different blog post idea. I'm going to give scrivener a try
-- I like how it looks. I have a whiteboard covered with post its, and
will often head to a cafe sans mac just to write on a clipboard. All
notes are dated, themed, titled, and stored in a folder according to
topic: e.g. SxD: psychology, or SxD: action sytems, and so on...

I'd like to make better use of talking to myself and am going to
purchase a discreet field recorder of some kind so that I can walk up
and down the haight, muttering and brainstorming. I'm not kidding. I
used to do this to try to capture others muttering -- once had a
hapless and unsuspecting dude lean into the left channel of my stereo
sonic studios mikes -- I hid them in a baseball cap -- and whisper
thuddingly: "doses, shrooms.." made my day and i still have the tape.

but talking is much faster than writing -- if somebody has a solid
recommendation on a digital recorder that you dont have to hold in
your hands, that'd be what i'm looking for..

interesting discussion. it would be cool if there were a slideshare,
or flowgram kind of real-time scrapbooking site that allowed one to
post, record, archive (skype or other voip chat) communication,
images, vid, webam, and notes, and designate "public/private" in order
to solicit process feedback...

cool,
a

On Oct 27, 2008, at 7:58 AM, Will Evans wrote:

> Does anyone use their iPhone/mobile device to send notes to
> themselves? How about refer back to their ideas that the posted to
> Twitter to follow up - with images attached? Just trying to get a
> feel for all the ways we keep track of the constant assault on our
> senses, how we process, store, and return to those inspirations,
> thoughts, ideas.
>
> On Mon, Oct 27, 2008 at 10:54 AM, adrian chan <adrian at gravity7.com>
> wrote:
> I hadn't even thought of the back of the hand -- that's great. I
> once had both my thumbs broken at the same time and walked about
> with both arms in casts -- had I been so inclined, they might have
> made for a great note-taking device, and a semi-public one at that.
> In fact the history of writing on the body is long indeed. (some
> argue that writing itself began with ritual practices of a violent
> "graphism" excercised during rites of passage and similar
> ceremonies...)
>
> But seriously tho, I like to draft thoughts within blogger some
> times -- I find that using blogger even to take notes puts me in a
> narrative mind set.
>
> a
>
>
>
>
> On Oct 26, 2008, at 1:52 PM, Jeff Howard wrote:
>
> I keep notes in a small gridded Moleskin notebook. But more important
> is simply having something to write with. Always. In a pinch I'll
> jot down observations on the back of my hand between the thumb and
> index finger. I never knew you could write there until I saw the
> movie Memento, but it's a really nice affordance.
>
> The only "formal" process I have for non-project related research
> is collecting local papers when I travel. Helps to see the world
> though a different set of eyes.
>
> // jeff
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34828
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>
>
> cheers,
>
> adrian chan
>
> 415 516 4442
> Social Interaction Design (www.gravity7.com)
> Sr Fellow, Society for New Communications Research (www.SNCR.org)
> LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com/in/adrianchan)
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>
>
>
> --
> ~ will
>
> "Where you innovate, how you innovate,
> and what you innovate are design problems"
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Will Evans | User Experience Architect
> tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
> aim: semanticwill
> gtalk: semanticwill
> twitter: semanticwill
> skype: semanticwill
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>

cheers,

adrian chan

415 516 4442
Social Interaction Design (www.gravity7.com)
Sr Fellow, Society for New Communications Research (www.SNCR.org)
LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com/in/adrianchan)

27 Oct 2008 - 2:49pm
Andreas Ringdal
2008

Evernote has a great iPhone app that lets you sync text, photo and
voice notes with the desktop and web editions of Evernote.

The only thing I miss from evernote is the ability to take a photo
and draw notes on the photo.

Andreas

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34828

27 Oct 2008 - 2:41pm
Andy Polaine
2008

> recorrder of some kind so that I can walk up and down the haight,
> muttering and brainstorming. I'm not kidding. I used to do this to
> try to capture others muttering -- once had a hapless and
> unsuspecting dude lean into the left channel of my stereo sonic
> studios mikes -- I hid them in a baseball cap -- and whisper
> thuddingly: "doses, shrooms.." made my day and i still have the tape.

I just write on the walls in chalk until they let me out of my cell. ;-)

27 Oct 2008 - 6:10pm
jet
2008

I've been doing this with my xv6800 (and before that, the 6700). I take
pictures of stuff then when I sync, they get transferred to my "incoming
photo" directory for me to sort/massage as needed.

I've also started shooting video this way -- the xv6800 camera is 2M and
shoots some pretty nice video for a camera/pda.

Will Evans wrote:
> Does anyone use their iPhone/mobile device to send notes to themselves? How
> about refer back to their ideas that the posted to Twitter to follow up -
> with images attached? Just trying to get a feel for all the ways we keep
> track of the constant assault on our senses, how we process, store, and
> return to those inspirations, thoughts, ideas.
>
> On Mon, Oct 27, 2008 at 10:54 AM, adrian chan <adrian at gravity7.com> wrote:
>
>> I hadn't even thought of the back of the hand -- that's great. I once had
>> both my thumbs broken at the same time and walked about with both arms in
>> casts -- had I been so inclined, they might have made for a great
>> note-taking device, and a semi-public one at that. In fact the history of
>> writing on the body is long indeed. (some argue that writing itself began
>> with ritual practices of a violent "graphism" excercised during rites of
>> passage and similar ceremonies...)
>>
>> But seriously tho, I like to draft thoughts within blogger some times -- I
>> find that using blogger even to take notes puts me in a narrative mind set.
>>
>> a
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Oct 26, 2008, at 1:52 PM, Jeff Howard wrote:
>>
>> I keep notes in a small gridded Moleskin notebook. But more important
>>> is simply having something to write with. Always. In a pinch I'll
>>> jot down observations on the back of my hand between the thumb and
>>> index finger. I never knew you could write there until I saw the
>>> movie Memento, but it's a really nice affordance.
>>>
>>> The only "formal" process I have for non-project related research
>>> is collecting local papers when I travel. Helps to see the world
>>> though a different set of eyes.
>>>
>>> // jeff
>>>
>>>
>>> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
>>> Posted from the new ixda.org
>>> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34828
>>>
>>>
>>> ________________________________________________________________
>>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>>
>>
>> cheers,
>>
>> adrian chan
>>
>> 415 516 4442
>> Social Interaction Design (www.gravity7.com)
>> Sr Fellow, Society for New Communications Research (www.SNCR.org)
>> LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com/in/adrianchan)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
>
>
>

--
J. Eric "jet" Townsend, CMU Master of Tangible Interaction Design '09

design: www.allartburns.org; hacking: www.flatline.net; HF: KG6ZVQ
PGP: 0xD0D8C2E8 AC9B 0A23 C61A 1B4A 27C5 F799 A681 3C11 D0D8 C2E8

27 Oct 2008 - 6:33pm
jet
2008

Andy Polaine wrote:
> I have 33 notebooks going all the way back to my university days when I
> first started numbering them - these days they're mostly Moleskines or
> Miquel Rius ones (if I can my hands on them). It's not a terribly formal
> process though. They switch from being notebooks to journals to sketches
> to "remember the milk". But I like the mix because it's a more honest
> record of things.

I used to be really anal and ended up carrying around 2-4 notebooks, one
for drawing, one for writing, one for "remember the milk", one for sake
tasting.

What I do now is just have one and start from the front for "serious"
stuff and from the back for "remember the milk". When those get close
to one another I start a new journal.

With the current set, I'm also playing with the idea of having tabbed
pages/sections for things that I update infrequently and that only take
a line or three. It's working pretty well for sake tasting and the
like, and I can just scan those two-three pages and stick them with
related pages from the next notebook.

--
J. Eric "jet" Townsend, CMU Master of Tangible Interaction Design '09

design: www.allartburns.org; hacking: www.flatline.net; HF: KG6ZVQ
PGP: 0xD0D8C2E8 AC9B 0A23 C61A 1B4A 27C5 F799 A681 3C11 D0D8 C2E8

31 Oct 2008 - 8:11am
Carol J. Smith
2007

I recommend ReQall (http://www.reqall.com/). I use it from the car all the
time.

I dial the phone number, say "Add" and voice my message. It records my
message and emails me a transcript (fairly accurate) and the recording (for
when the transcript is way off). If there is a date and time involved
(lunch with Susie, 12 on Tuesday) it also send me a reminder at the
appropriate time.

Don Norman is one of the people behind this technology - thanks Don if
you're reading!! Now I'm not texting while driving. :)

Carol

-------------------
Carol J. Smith
Principal Consultant, Midwest Research, LLC
http://www.mw-research.com
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/0/167/781

On Mon, Oct 27, 2008 at 3:41 PM, Andy Polaine <apolaine at gmail.com> wrote:

> recorrder of some kind so that I can walk up and down the haight, muttering
>> and brainstorming. I'm not kidding. I used to do this to try to capture
>> others muttering -- once had a hapless and unsuspecting dude lean into the
>> left channel of my stereo sonic studios mikes -- I hid them in a baseball
>> cap -- and whisper thuddingly: "doses, shrooms.." made my day and i still
>> have the tape.
>>
>
> I just write on the walls in chalk until they let me out of my cell. ;-)
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

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