Invention vs. innovation

8 Nov 2004 - 9:16am
9 years ago
2 replies
562 reads
Dave Malouf
2005

http://www.wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,65618,00.html?tw=wn_tophead_5

The above wired article is about a PBS series called "They Made America". It
is about how the biggest impacts to both US and world culture and commerce
have not come from those that invented things but those who have innovated
those inventions into harnessable transformative solutions.

The reason I'm forwarding this is that I'm really intrigued by this concept
that the best solution is not something completely new, but rather turning
an existing idea on its edge and transforming it into something useful,
desireable and pursuasive.

Just wanted to pass it out.

-- dave

Comments

8 Nov 2004 - 9:57am
Dan Saffer
2003

I just heard a talk by John Body, who works for the Australian Tax
Board and is, oddly (or perhaps not so oddly) enough also a
mathematician who has studied chaos theory. One of his ideas about how
chaos theory can be applied to design is that things on the edge are
more interesting because they can move into more states, which in light
of this conversation could be called innovation. (It could also be
called disaster...)

http://www.odannyboy.com/blog/cmu/new_archives/
chaos_theory_for_sustainable_design.html

Dan

8 Nov 2004 - 3:56pm
John Vaughan - ...
2004

David Heller said:
> The reason I'm forwarding this is that I'm really intrigued by
> this concept
> that the best solution is not something completely new, but rather
> turningan existing idea on its edge and transforming it into
> something useful,
> desireable and pursuasive.

Up there on my list is Steve Jobs, who sucessfully packaged the "Star" interface (pioneered by PARC) and the 3 1/2" diskette (pioneered by Sony) - along with other techno tools. In many ways he sped the transition of the techno-centric "computer" into an accessible, truly popular device. And helped legitimize UXP as a result ...

3 for 3: useful, desireable and persuasive

PS: Much as I respect the power of Windows as an extension of the Mac metaphor, I believe that its influence is more derivative than innovative.

Syndicate content Get the feed