Any thoughts on placement of company contact information?

18 Nov 2008 - 10:43am
5 years ago
7 replies
603 reads
tonyzeoli
2008

Over the past few years, I¹ve been imploring smaller companies who have
brochure-ware sites or have a limited product offering to put their contact
information (address, tel, email, fax) and if need by, their support
telephone and email on the homepage. Usually, in the header or footer
depending on the overall site design. I feel hiding this information behind
a click just leads to frustration.

Any thoughts?

--

Anthony Zeoli | ZAAH.COM
VP Product & Business Development

e: azeoli at zaah.com

+1 631.873.2007 | Direct
+1 631.873.2007 | Main
+1 917.705.4700 | Mobile
+1 631.873.2050 | Fax

AIM: djtonyz | Yahoo: anthonyzeoli | MSN: djtonyz | Skype: tonyzeoli |
Twitter: djtonyz

6 Dubon Court
Farmingdale, NY 11735

This document contains proprietary and confidential information, which are
the exclusive property of Zaah Technologies, Inc. Unauthorized use of this
or any document, marked confidential is strictly prohibited.
Copyright© 2008 Zaah Technologies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Comments

18 Nov 2008 - 10:50am
Danny Hope
2008

2008/11/18 Anthony Zeoli <tony at zaah.com>:
> Over the past few years, I¹ve been imploring smaller companies who have
> brochure-ware sites or have a limited product offering to put their contact
> information (address, tel, email, fax) and if need by, their support
> telephone and email on the homepage. Usually, in the header or footer
> depending on the overall site design. I feel hiding this information behind
> a click just leads to frustration.
>
> Any thoughts?

It depends on whether your clients want more people to make contact
via phone/email/fax. Personally I wouldn't want to clutter up a
website with the addition of a fax number.

--
Regards,
Danny Hope
http://linkedin.com/in/dannyhope
07595 226 792

18 Nov 2008 - 11:06am
SemanticWill
2007

Unless your in the third world, isn't fax dead? I don't care where the
contact info is as long as it is clear - that is a clear Contact Us.
The funny thing is the number if web 2.0 companies that have a
spurious contatc and about us sections- the particularly fly by night
just have a web form.

will evans
emotive architect &
hedonic designer
will at semanticfoundry.com
617.281.1281
twitter: semanticwill
aim: semanticwill
gtalk: wkevans4
skype: semanticwill
_________________________
Sent via iPhone

On Nov 18, 2008, at 10:50 AM, "Danny Hope" <danny.hope at gmail.com> wrote:

> 2008/11/18 Anthony Zeoli <tony at zaah.com>:
>> Over the past few years, I¹ve been imploring smaller companies who
>> have
>> brochure-ware sites or have a limited product offering to put their
>> contact
>> information (address, tel, email, fax) and if need by, their support
>> telephone and email on the homepage. Usually, in the header or footer
>> depending on the overall site design. I feel hiding this
>> information behind
>> a click just leads to frustration.
>>
>> Any thoughts?
>
> It depends on whether your clients want more people to make contact
> via phone/email/fax. Personally I wouldn't want to clutter up a
> website with the addition of a fax number.
>
> --
> Regards,
> Danny Hope
> http://linkedin.com/in/dannyhope
> 07595 226 792
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

18 Nov 2008 - 11:20am
Mark Schraad
2006

Hi Anthony,
Not sure that 'hiding it behind a click' is a fair description. There is
typically a lot of demand for the real estate on the main page of any site.
Certainly extending the page down is... we kind of free - as consumers seem
to get the top/bottom hierarchy of information.

Would it be 'hiding' the information if you put it in a drawer or exposed it
in a layer upon click? If I come to the site three times a day over the
course of several months. I am not sure that one or two times I need the
contact information is worthy of taking the space and adding to the noise
level near the top.

A general rule... or even a debate over specific hypotheticals is probably
not going to clarify this issue or bring it to any resolve. My 2 cents.

Mark

On Tue, Nov 18, 2008 at 10:43 AM, Anthony Zeoli <tony at zaah.com> wrote:

> Over the past few years, I¹ve been imploring smaller companies who have
> brochure-ware sites or have a limited product offering to put their contact
> information (address, tel, email, fax) and if need by, their support
> telephone and email on the homepage. Usually, in the header or footer
> depending on the overall site design. I feel hiding this information behind
> a click just leads to frustration.
>
> Any thoughts?
>
>
> --
>
> Anthony Zeoli | ZAAH.COM
> VP Product & Business Development
>
> e: azeoli at zaah.com
>
> +1 631.873.2007 | Direct
> +1 631.873.2007 | Main
> +1 917.705.4700 | Mobile
> +1 631.873.2050 | Fax
>
> AIM: djtonyz | Yahoo: anthonyzeoli | MSN: djtonyz | Skype: tonyzeoli |
> Twitter: djtonyz
>
> 6 Dubon Court
> Farmingdale, NY 11735
>
> This document contains proprietary and confidential information, which are
> the exclusive property of Zaah Technologies, Inc. Unauthorized use of this
> or any document, marked confidential is strictly prohibited.
> Copyright(c) 2008 Zaah Technologies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

18 Nov 2008 - 11:23am
Katie Albers
2005

Sure, fax is dead. It's just showing remarkable
zombie tendencies. I'm constantly irritated by
people who want me to fax them thus-and-such, or
want my fax number so they can fax me
this-or-that and who absolutely will not allow
email communication -- if they even have the
capacity. Governmental agencies leap to mind;
most medical practices; many aspects of the
various phone companies, and so on, and so on.

However, as to the original question, any company
with a web page should absolutely put its contact
info -- of some sort, if not all of it -- on its
home page. It improves the brand, provides a
better user experience, and reassures the
customer that you exist elsewhere besides just
the web.

kt

At 11:06 AM -0500 11/18/08, William Evans wrote:
>Unless your in the third world, isn't fax dead?
>I don't care where the contact info is as long
>as it is clear - that is a clear Contact Us. The
>funny thing is the number if web 2.0 companies
>that have a spurious contatc and about us
>sections- the particularly fly by night just
>have a web form.
>
>will evans
>On Nov 18, 2008, at 10:50 AM, "Danny Hope" <danny.hope at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>>2008/11/18 Anthony Zeoli <tony at zaah.com>:
>>>Over the past few years, I©–ve been imploring smaller companies who have
>>>brochure-ware sites or have a limited product offering to put their contact
>>>information (address, tel, email, fax) and if need by, their support
>>>telephone and email on the homepage. Usually, in the header or footer
>>>depending on the overall site design. I feel hiding this information behind
>>>a click just leads to frustration.
>>>
>>>Any thoughts?

--
Katie Albers, Founder & Principal Consultant
Firstthought
User Experience and Business Strategy
+1 310 356 7550 (voice)
katie at firstthought.com

18 Nov 2008 - 1:26pm
johnwromano
2008

I think it really comes down to the goals of the site and way users
use it. Many brochure ware sites exist as a one time destination
where the entire purpose is to entice users to contact the company.
In those cases putting the contact info on at the top of EVERY page
makes sense.

On sites that have broader uses, putting the contact info on a
"contact us" page makes more sense to free up the layout.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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18 Nov 2008 - 12:31pm
jaketrimble
2008

I agree with Katie's comments. Especially for companies who may not
have a wealth of contact options.

In cases where creating a contact page might not be founded, ensure
that ALL the other pages have the contact information on it (standard
header/footer), don't just rely on the homepage for contact
information.

For instances as such I usually try to break up the contact
information (some on top and some on bottom).

I usually put the phone on top and an email address (if needed) in
clear text. Meaning not just a hyperlink saying "contact us", but
rather contact at domain.com.

The bottom of the page is where it is easy to put an address and
other archaic forms of communication such as "fax" (come on people
it's still good and useful technology). One recommendation I would
have for the address is to make sure that it is highlight-able so
that users can utilize their widgets. Unless of course the site is
partnered with someone and they want to display their own map on the
site. But in your situation this doesn't seem to be the case.

One easy example is Dell's site. Of course they have layers of
communication avenues but when you hit the site, you instantly have a
contact number.

Just remember...If you aren't going to have a contact page, ensure
that the contact information (wherever you put it) is 1) easily
noticed and 2) redundant throughout the site.

-Jake

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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20 Nov 2008 - 12:17am
dszuc
2005

Keep contact information up front and easy to find on your web site
and be fast to respond when people do contact you via email. Its nice
when you hear "wow that was quick" or "thanks for responding so
quickly" -- it seems that there are people who have experienced very
slow response times from companies.

Its also surprising the relationships you can create without picking
up a phone these days but of course it also nice to hear a voice.

rgds,
Dan

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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