The Designers Review of Books

18 Nov 2008 - 1:09pm
5 years ago
19 replies
1509 reads
Andy Polaine
2008

Hi folks,

Quick plug for a new site I've launched called The Designers Review of
Books http://www.designersreviewofbooks.com

Although there are not yet any reviews on interaction design you can
be sure I will be covering that area quite a bit, given that it's my
own discipline. I'm going to be (p)reviewing Dan Saffer's Designing
Gestural Interfaces very soon too (thanks Dan!) to coincide with an
interview with him on Core77.

So, here are two questions to you all:

1. If you had to choose one book that has had a big impact on you
creatively or career-wise, what is it and why?

2. What would be your top 2 interaction design (in the broadest sense
- usability, experience, etc., etc.) must have books ?

I'll probably only be able to keep it going if it gets a decent of
traffic so, you know, subscribe, tell your friends, blog it, tweet it,
delicious it and all that.

(And before you ask me about the apostrophe, take a look at the latest
post).

Best,

Andy

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Andy Polaine

Research | Writing | Strategy
Interaction Concept Design
Education Futures

Twitter: apolaine
Skype: apolaine

http://playpen.polaine.com
http://www.designersreviewofbooks.com
http://www.omnium.net.au
http://www.antirom.com

Comments

18 Nov 2008 - 1:40pm
Loren Baxter
2007

Hey Andy,

Thanks again for starting this site, I've been wanting to see something like
it for a while. Nice design, too :)

I just read *The Laws of Simplicity* by John Maeda and know that it will
influence my work for a long time. The laws are simple (go figure) and
direct, and the design of the entire book embodies what he's saying.

Loren

-----
http://acleandesign.com

On Tue, Nov 18, 2008 at 10:09 AM, Andy Polaine <apolaine at gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi folks,
>
> Quick plug for a new site I've launched called The Designers Review of
> Books http://www.designersreviewofbooks.com
>
> Although there are not yet any reviews on interaction design you can be
> sure I will be covering that area quite a bit, given that it's my own
> discipline. I'm going to be (p)reviewing Dan Saffer's Designing Gestural
> Interfaces very soon too (thanks Dan!) to coincide with an interview with
> him on Core77.
>
> So, here are two questions to you all:
>
> 1. If you had to choose one book that has had a big impact on you
> creatively or career-wise, what is it and why?
>
> 2. What would be your top 2 interaction design (in the broadest sense -
> usability, experience, etc., etc.) must have books ?
>
> I'll probably only be able to keep it going if it gets a decent of traffic
> so, you know, subscribe, tell your friends, blog it, tweet it, delicious it
> and all that.
>
> (And before you ask me about the apostrophe, take a look at the latest
> post).
>
> Best,
>
> Andy
>
> ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
> Andy Polaine
>
> Research | Writing | Strategy
> Interaction Concept Design
> Education Futures
>
> Twitter: apolaine
> Skype: apolaine
>
> http://playpen.polaine.com
> http://www.designersreviewofbooks.com
> http://www.omnium.net.au
> http://www.antirom.com
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

19 Nov 2008 - 2:48am
Jonas Löwgren
2003

Andy,

Great initiative.

In case you would find it useful to have an annotated list of books
in interaction design and related topics to choose from, may I suggest

http://webzone.k3.mah.se/k3jolo/idBookshelf

I find it nearly impossible to pick two "top interaction design must-
have books" -- it depends on who must have them, of course.

But the three that I currently use for an introductory-level
interaction design class at Malmö University are

--------

Saffer, D. (2007). Designing for interaction: Creating smart
applications and clever devices. Berkeley, CA: New Riders.

A useful first introduction to interaction design, covering a lot of
ground in a very light and readable way. Saffer characterizes the
field, discusses the digital design materials and tools, outlines the
phases of the design process, and even touches on more advanced
topics such as adaptivity, service design, ethics and future
challenges -- all very brief and approachable. I imagine that the
book might whet the appetite of many readers to know more about
interaction design. Too bad that there are no references or
suggestions for further study.

Buxton, B. (2007). Sketching user experiences: Getting the design
right and the right design. San Francisco: Morgan Kaufmann.

Buxton develops a clearly articulated design perspective on the
creation of digital products, based firmly in the seminal activity of
sketching. The core part of the book is an inventory of sketching
techniques, presented through well-chosen examples and illustrating a
breadth of approaches to the key question of how to sketch temporal
behavior and interactivity. Buxton lays out two parallel threads to
frame the sketching examples -- a discussion of professional product
development, and a scholarly perspective on the history and
significance of sketching in design -- which makes the book a highly
valuable resource for professional interaction designers as well as
teachers and students.

Moggridge, B. (2007). Designing interactions. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT
Press.

A truly remarkable book, painting a rich picture of interaction
design practice by means of some forty journalistically rendered
interviews with outstanding designers and a substantial piece of
reflection on the author's own experience as an interaction designer.
There are several strengths to the book: It adopts and illustrates a
consistent design perspective (as opposed to, e.g., a HCI
perspective); it gives roughly equal weight to hardware and software
design; it covers the history of interaction design for personal
computing as well as related fields including games, multimedia and
service design; it is well designed and produced in itself, with a
beautiful flow between sections and with generous and appropriate
image material. The appended DVD provides interview segments and,
more importantly, some demos to illustrate key topics. The only
drawback I can find is a slight bias towards Silicon Valley people
and practices, which is certainly historically justifiable but still
constrains the overall picture somewhat. Nevertheless, I would
consider this book to be required reading for all students, teachers
and practitioners who need a comprehensive and up-to-date view of
interaction design practice.

--------

For my own work in participatory crossmedia, the most inspirational
books lately have been:

--------

Bolter, J., Gromala, D. (2003). Windows and mirrors: Interaction
design, digital art and the myth of transparency. Cambridge, Mass.:
The MIT Press.

As one of rather few examples in the literature, this book addresses
the aesthetic qualities of interaction design. It consists of a set
of essays composed around selected exhibits from the SIGGRAPH Art
Gallery in the year 2000. The main thesis is that interaction is
culturally reflective as much as efficiently transparent, and the
book offers several important insights for interaction designers.

Jenkins, H. (2006). Convergence culture: Where old and new media
collide. New York: New York University Press.

Jenkins addresses the convergence of mass media and interactive media
from a solid background in studies of fan cultures. He builds his
arguments around three core concepts -- media convergence,
participatory culture, and collective intelligence -- which he
develops in a series of well-written and engaging case studies,
ranging from online communities of Survivor spoilers to Harry Potter
fan-fiction IPR controversies and the US elections. The focus is
largely on how the established mass media "collide" with new media
cultures and practices, and the new media forms originating in the
digital realm are generally less well covered. Nevertheless, I
consider the insights offered in the book to be required reading for
any interaction designer involved in transmedia/crossmedia projects.

Lasica, J. D. (2005). Darknet: Hollywood's war against the digital
generation. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley.

The digital media convergence and the rapid dissemination of media
production capabilities is a challenge to many existing structures in
the media industries. Lasica looks specifically at how established
entertainment industries in music and movies react to the "threats"
of filesharing, local production, mods, remixes and other personal
digital media possibilities. The emerging picture, which Lasica
paints in very lively colors using a journalistic presentation style,
is focused on restrictions, violations of user rights, and political
power plays in the interest of continued economic gain. The
perspective of the book is clearly biased in favor of personal media,
underground movements and a certain amount of Internet evangelism --
but the underlying conflicts are extremely interesting for any
interaction designer involved in the digital media.

Lovink, G. (2002). Dark fiber: Tracking critical Internet culture.
Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

A collection of essays on digital media, covering a broad scope of
issues such as net culture, language use, dotcom rise and fall, co-
presence and community. The main theme of the texts, and the direct
topic for several of them, is media activism and what Lovink calls
tactical media: Using the digital media for politically and
ideologically radical means.

--------

And for my academic work in interaction design theory, I would have
to mention:

--------

Krippendorff, K. (2006). The semantic turn: A new foundation for
design. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.

Krippendorff argues for a human-centered view on design, where the
core notion is meaning as created in use. He outlines a historical
progression in the traditional design disciplines from product
styling towards more complex, relational concerns, including the
possibility of a design science. From an interaction design point-of-
view, what is really interesting about the book is that it provides a
conceptual bridge between the traditional design disciplines and the
use-oriented perspectives that are at the heart of interaction design.

Sennett, R. (2008). The craftsman. London: Allen Lane.

Sennett, a renowned sociologist, writes about craft based on a broad
historical base, ranging from ancient Greece to Linux open source
communities. For a design researcher, the book corroborates all that
is said in general design theory, such as the work by Schön, as well
as interaction-design specific accounts such as the one by
McCullough. Moreover, it extends and elaborates upon this knowledge
in several fruitful directions, including the social dynamics of the
workshop and the asymmetric relation between master and apprentice;
the detailed nature of head-and-hand work in complex craft skills
(including the importance of rhythm and concentration); the nature of
learning crafts and the roles of instructions and tools in learning.
Further relevant themes include the concepts of resistance and
ambiguity, the ethics of craftmanship, and the relation between play
and craft. In sum, it is a remarkable book that adds significantly to
the body of knowledge in interaction-design research and education.

--------

Best of luck with your DRB project -- looking forward to seeing how
it develops!

Jonas Löwgren

19 Nov 2008 - 3:57am
Andy Polaine
2008

Thanks for all the suggestions (and your great list Jonas) - feel free
to keep them coming!

Most of the interaction books are on my shelf too, but there are
plenty more I'd like to get my hands on. I am planning a post on play
literature because that's what my PhD is about and it's becoming
increasing popular in design and interaction design thinking at the
moment (I'm happy to see).

I'm also interested in "Not Design" books. For example, Writing Down
the Bones by Natalie Goldberg and Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott are two
that have had a much bigger influence on my creative process than many
design books.

If anyone feels like writing a review, let me know too.

Best,

Andy

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Andy Polaine

Research | Writing | Strategy
Interaction Concept Design
Education Futures

Twitter: apolaine
Skype: apolaine

http://playpen.polaine.com
http://www.designersreviewofbooks.com
http://www.omnium.net.au
http://www.antirom.com

18 Nov 2008 - 4:29pm
ELISABETH HUBERT
2007

HI Andy,

I would def. say Scott Berkun's the Myth of Innovation is one o my
all time favorites simply because it trains your mind to think of
common day things from a different point of view. Also teaches me not
to believe everything i'm told and to dig deeper for answers. Good
luck!

Lis
http://www.elisabethhubert.com

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35729

19 Nov 2008 - 10:08am
Chris Jochetz
2008

Two of my top books are Donald Norman's The Design of Everyday Things
and Alan Cooper's About Face 3: The Essentials of Interaction
Design. Both of these books cover the essentials of the subject quite
well, but I have to credit The Design of Everyday Things for getting
me to begin to think differently about the work I produce.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35729

19 Nov 2008 - 10:31am
Morten Just
2008

For me, it's been Allan Cooper's The inmates are running the asylum.

Not only did it clearly and with brevity introduce me to
goal-directed design, personas, etc, it also gave me insightful
understanding of how developers see user interface tasks.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35729

19 Nov 2008 - 10:47am
Tomas Garcia Ferrari
2008

I would like to add three authors that are not so common in the
English literature:

Tomás Maldonado, Gui Bonsiepe and Vilém Flusser.

Tomás Maldonado is an argentinian painter, designer and thinker. He
was the director of the hfg ulm (Germany) and one of the theorist
behind the model of Ulm. Unfortunately, most of Maldonado%u2019s
texts are not translated into English (yet). But for those that can
read Italian or Spanish, it's a must. As an example, this book:

Maldonado, Tomás. Reale e virtuale. Milano: Feltrinelli, 2005.

Gui Bonsiepe studied and taught in the hfg ulm and then moved to
Latin America, working mainly in Chile, Argentina and Brazil. He also
taught until recent time in the Fachhochschule Köln (now named KISD).
Some of his texts are in English, such as:

Bonsiepe, Gui. Interface - An Approach to Design. Netherlands: Jan
Van Eyck Akademie, 1999.

Vilém Flusser is a philosopher, media and design theorist born in
Prague. He migrated to Brazil in the early %u201940s where he
produced most of his work. Again, his ideas were published in German
or Portuguese. But it seems to be appearing in English too:

Flusser, Vilém. Writings (Electronic Mediations). Minneapolis:
University of Minnesota Press, 2004.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35729

19 Nov 2008 - 11:52am
Andy Polaine
2008

Thanks for those, interesting to have some more unusual ones. I've
added them to my scarily long list.

If they’re in German I could probably manage, but Non parlo italiano
and No hablo español.

On 19 Nov 2008, at 07:47, Tomas Garcia Ferrari wrote:

> I would like to add three authors that are not so common in the
> English literature:
>
> Tomás Maldonado, Gui Bonsiepe and Vilém Flusser.
>
> Tomás Maldonado is an argentinian painter, designer and thinker. He
> was the director of the hfg ulm (Germany) and one of the theorist
> behind the model of Ulm. Unfortunately, most of Maldonado%u2019s
> texts are not translated into English (yet). But for those that can
> read Italian or Spanish, it's a must. As an example, this book:
>
> Maldonado, Tomás. Reale e virtuale. Milano: Feltrinelli, 2005.
>
> Gui Bonsiepe studied and taught in the hfg ulm and then moved to
> Latin America, working mainly in Chile, Argentina and Brazil. He also
> taught until recent time in the Fachhochschule Köln (now named KISD).
> Some of his texts are in English, such as:
>
> Bonsiepe, Gui. Interface - An Approach to Design. Netherlands: Jan
> Van Eyck Akademie, 1999.
>
> Vilém Flusser is a philosopher, media and design theorist born in
> Prague. He migrated to Brazil in the early %u201940s where he
> produced most of his work. Again, his ideas were published in German
> or Portuguese. But it seems to be appearing in English too:
>
> Flusser, Vilém. Writings (Electronic Mediations). Minneapolis:
> University of Minnesota Press, 2004.
>
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35729
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

19 Nov 2008 - 11:53am
Andy Polaine
2008

Thanks for those, interesting to have some more unusual ones. I've
added them to my scarily long list.

If they’re in German I could probably manage, but Non parlo italiano
and No hablo español.

On 19 Nov 2008, at 07:47, Tomas Garcia Ferrari wrote:

> I would like to add three authors that are not so common in the
> English literature:
>
> Tomás Maldonado, Gui Bonsiepe and Vilém Flusser.
>
> Tomás Maldonado is an argentinian painter, designer and thinker. He
> was the director of the hfg ulm (Germany) and one of the theorist
> behind the model of Ulm. Unfortunately, most of Maldonado%u2019s
> texts are not translated into English (yet). But for those that can
> read Italian or Spanish, it's a must. As an example, this book:
>
> Maldonado, Tomás. Reale e virtuale. Milano: Feltrinelli, 2005.
>
> Gui Bonsiepe studied and taught in the hfg ulm and then moved to
> Latin America, working mainly in Chile, Argentina and Brazil. He also
> taught until recent time in the Fachhochschule Köln (now named KISD).
> Some of his texts are in English, such as:
>
> Bonsiepe, Gui. Interface - An Approach to Design. Netherlands: Jan
> Van Eyck Akademie, 1999.
>
> Vilém Flusser is a philosopher, media and design theorist born in
> Prague. He migrated to Brazil in the early %u201940s where he
> produced most of his work. Again, his ideas were published in German
> or Portuguese. But it seems to be appearing in English too:
>
> Flusser, Vilém. Writings (Electronic Mediations). Minneapolis:
> University of Minnesota Press, 2004.
>
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35729
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

19 Nov 2008 - 12:57pm
Taras Brizitsky
2008

1. Alan Cooper's About face.
There were a few books before Cooper, but none of them have been that
much mind changing.

2. Envisioning Information by Tufte (actually I'd join all of his
books here) and Designing Interactions by Bill Moggridge. Both are
hardly sets of recipes :)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35729

19 Nov 2008 - 1:32pm
Ali Naqvi
2008

1.
Don Norman's 'The Design of Everyday Things'. This book gave me the
basics about Interaction Design.

2.
Sketching User Experiences: Getting the Design Right and the Right
Design. Written by Bill Buxton.
User Interface Design and Evaluation.
Written by Debbie Stone, Caroline Jarrett, Mark Woodroffe and Shailey
Minocha.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35729

19 Nov 2008 - 1:37pm
Dave Malouf
2005

Most influential book: Digital Ground by Malcolm McCullough

Important IxD books:
"Sketching User Experience" - B. Buxton
"Design of Everyday Things" - D. Norman
"Designing Interactions" - B. Moggridge
"Designing for Interaction" - D. Saffer
"Inmates are Running the Asylum" - A. Cooper
"Elements of User Experience Design" - J.J. Garrett

-- dave

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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19 Nov 2008 - 2:22pm
Ali Naqvi
2008

just ordered A. Cooper's INMATES ARE RUNNING THE ASYLUM. Though by
reading the reviews it sounds to be very close to Don Norman's
DESIGNING FOR FUTURE THINGS....

ali

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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19 Nov 2008 - 10:17pm
Michael Andrews
2008

As we head into a new depression, I find myself attracted to some
titles published during the anything-is-possible days of the dot.com
bubble. Somehow design has in recent years got demoted to being
simply cool and essential, rather than transformative.

I like Peter Small's The Entrepreneurial Web (2000), which presages
much of Web 2.0. Also check out Robert and Michele Root-Bernstein's
Sparks of Genius: the 13 thinking tools of the worlds most creative
people (1999) which is far meatier and inspiring than the title
suggests

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35729

19 Nov 2008 - 10:53pm
Chad Vavra
2008

I have no personal single favorites but some really interesting reads
in recent memory are.

Daniel Pink, A Whole New Mind

and

Dan Roam, Back of the Napkin

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35729

20 Nov 2008 - 1:21am
Jarod Tang
2007

I would add The Sciences of the Artificial - 3rd Edition (Paperback)
by Herbert A. Simon (Author) , to design theory list.

On Wed, Nov 19, 2008 at 3:48 PM, Jonas Löwgren <jonas.lowgren at mah.se> wrote:
> Andy,
>
> Great initiative.
>
> In case you would find it useful to have an annotated list of books in
> interaction design and related topics to choose from, may I suggest
>
> http://webzone.k3.mah.se/k3jolo/idBookshelf
>
> I find it nearly impossible to pick two "top interaction design must-have
> books" -- it depends on who must have them, of course.
>
> But the three that I currently use for an introductory-level interaction
> design class at Malmö University are
>
> --------
>
> Saffer, D. (2007). Designing for interaction: Creating smart applications
> and clever devices. Berkeley, CA: New Riders.
>
> A useful first introduction to interaction design, covering a lot of ground
> in a very light and readable way. Saffer characterizes the field, discusses
> the digital design materials and tools, outlines the phases of the design
> process, and even touches on more advanced topics such as adaptivity,
> service design, ethics and future challenges -- all very brief and
> approachable. I imagine that the book might whet the appetite of many
> readers to know more about interaction design. Too bad that there are no
> references or suggestions for further study.
>
> Buxton, B. (2007). Sketching user experiences: Getting the design right and
> the right design. San Francisco: Morgan Kaufmann.
>
> Buxton develops a clearly articulated design perspective on the creation of
> digital products, based firmly in the seminal activity of sketching. The
> core part of the book is an inventory of sketching techniques, presented
> through well-chosen examples and illustrating a breadth of approaches to the
> key question of how to sketch temporal behavior and interactivity. Buxton
> lays out two parallel threads to frame the sketching examples -- a
> discussion of professional product development, and a scholarly perspective
> on the history and significance of sketching in design -- which makes the
> book a highly valuable resource for professional interaction designers as
> well as teachers and students.
>
> Moggridge, B. (2007). Designing interactions. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.
>
> A truly remarkable book, painting a rich picture of interaction design
> practice by means of some forty journalistically rendered interviews with
> outstanding designers and a substantial piece of reflection on the author's
> own experience as an interaction designer. There are several strengths to
> the book: It adopts and illustrates a consistent design perspective (as
> opposed to, e.g., a HCI perspective); it gives roughly equal weight to
> hardware and software design; it covers the history of interaction design
> for personal computing as well as related fields including games, multimedia
> and service design; it is well designed and produced in itself, with a
> beautiful flow between sections and with generous and appropriate image
> material. The appended DVD provides interview segments and, more
> importantly, some demos to illustrate key topics. The only drawback I can
> find is a slight bias towards Silicon Valley people and practices, which is
> certainly historically justifiable but still constrains the overall picture
> somewhat. Nevertheless, I would consider this book to be required reading
> for all students, teachers and practitioners who need a comprehensive and
> up-to-date view of interaction design practice.
>
> --------
>
> For my own work in participatory crossmedia, the most inspirational books
> lately have been:
>
> --------
>
> Bolter, J., Gromala, D. (2003). Windows and mirrors: Interaction design,
> digital art and the myth of transparency. Cambridge, Mass.: The MIT Press.
>
> As one of rather few examples in the literature, this book addresses the
> aesthetic qualities of interaction design. It consists of a set of essays
> composed around selected exhibits from the SIGGRAPH Art Gallery in the year
> 2000. The main thesis is that interaction is culturally reflective as much
> as efficiently transparent, and the book offers several important insights
> for interaction designers.
>
> Jenkins, H. (2006). Convergence culture: Where old and new media collide.
> New York: New York University Press.
>
> Jenkins addresses the convergence of mass media and interactive media from a
> solid background in studies of fan cultures. He builds his arguments around
> three core concepts -- media convergence, participatory culture, and
> collective intelligence -- which he develops in a series of well-written and
> engaging case studies, ranging from online communities of Survivor spoilers
> to Harry Potter fan-fiction IPR controversies and the US elections. The
> focus is largely on how the established mass media "collide" with new media
> cultures and practices, and the new media forms originating in the digital
> realm are generally less well covered. Nevertheless, I consider the insights
> offered in the book to be required reading for any interaction designer
> involved in transmedia/crossmedia projects.
>
> Lasica, J. D. (2005). Darknet: Hollywood's war against the digital
> generation. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley.
>
> The digital media convergence and the rapid dissemination of media
> production capabilities is a challenge to many existing structures in the
> media industries. Lasica looks specifically at how established entertainment
> industries in music and movies react to the "threats" of filesharing, local
> production, mods, remixes and other personal digital media possibilities.
> The emerging picture, which Lasica paints in very lively colors using a
> journalistic presentation style, is focused on restrictions, violations of
> user rights, and political power plays in the interest of continued economic
> gain. The perspective of the book is clearly biased in favor of personal
> media, underground movements and a certain amount of Internet evangelism --
> but the underlying conflicts are extremely interesting for any interaction
> designer involved in the digital media.
>
> Lovink, G. (2002). Dark fiber: Tracking critical Internet culture.
> Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.
>
> A collection of essays on digital media, covering a broad scope of issues
> such as net culture, language use, dotcom rise and fall, co-presence and
> community. The main theme of the texts, and the direct topic for several of
> them, is media activism and what Lovink calls tactical media: Using the
> digital media for politically and ideologically radical means.
>
> --------
>
> And for my academic work in interaction design theory, I would have to
> mention:
>
> --------
>
> Krippendorff, K. (2006). The semantic turn: A new foundation for design.
> Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.
>
> Krippendorff argues for a human-centered view on design, where the core
> notion is meaning as created in use. He outlines a historical progression in
> the traditional design disciplines from product styling towards more
> complex, relational concerns, including the possibility of a design science.
> From an interaction design point-of-view, what is really interesting about
> the book is that it provides a conceptual bridge between the traditional
> design disciplines and the use-oriented perspectives that are at the heart
> of interaction design.
>
> Sennett, R. (2008). The craftsman. London: Allen Lane.
>
> Sennett, a renowned sociologist, writes about craft based on a broad
> historical base, ranging from ancient Greece to Linux open source
> communities. For a design researcher, the book corroborates all that is said
> in general design theory, such as the work by Schön, as well as
> interaction-design specific accounts such as the one by McCullough.
> Moreover, it extends and elaborates upon this knowledge in several fruitful
> directions, including the social dynamics of the workshop and the asymmetric
> relation between master and apprentice; the detailed nature of head-and-hand
> work in complex craft skills (including the importance of rhythm and
> concentration); the nature of learning crafts and the roles of instructions
> and tools in learning. Further relevant themes include the concepts of
> resistance and ambiguity, the ethics of craftmanship, and the relation
> between play and craft. In sum, it is a remarkable book that adds
> significantly to the body of knowledge in interaction-design research and
> education.
>
> --------
>
>
> Best of luck with your DRB project -- looking forward to seeing how it
> develops!
>
> Jonas Löwgren
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
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--
http://designforuse.blogspot.com/

19 Nov 2008 - 2:06pm
Andy Polaine
2008

I might have to do a IxDA booklist post before I manage to review all
of these. About 2/3 are on my bookshelf already, the others on the
wishlist...

Best,

Andy

On 19 Nov 2008, at 10:37, David Malouf wrote:

> Most influential book: Digital Ground by Malcolm McCullough
>
> Important IxD books:
> "Sketching User Experience" - B. Buxton
> "Design of Everyday Things" - D. Norman
> "Designing Interactions" - B. Moggridge
> "Designing for Interaction" - D. Saffer
> "Inmates are Running the Asylum" - A. Cooper
> "Elements of User Experience Design" - J.J. Garrett
>
> -- dave
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35729
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

25 Nov 2008 - 12:41pm
Sam Menter
2008

Hi all

I've posted a list of my reads here:
http://www.pixelthread.co.uk/reading-list/

Lots of overlaps, and my list steers towards the less academic end of the UE
spectrum.

I have to say that About Face has been the most influential book I've read.

Cheers
Sam

Disclaimer: a couple of the links on there are Amazon affiliates links which
I added last year when my blog had lots of traffic. However I've never had
enough clicks to get over the $10 threshold to get a cheque from Amazon!

2008/11/19 Andy Polaine <andy at polaine.com>

> I might have to do a IxDA booklist post before I manage to review all of
> these. About 2/3 are on my bookshelf already, the others on the wishlist...
>
> Best,
>
> Andy
>
>
> On 19 Nov 2008, at 10:37, David Malouf wrote:
>
> Most influential book: Digital Ground by Malcolm McCullough
>>
>> Important IxD books:
>> "Sketching User Experience" - B. Buxton
>> "Design of Everyday Things" - D. Norman
>> "Designing Interactions" - B. Moggridge
>> "Designing for Interaction" - D. Saffer
>> "Inmates are Running the Asylum" - A. Cooper
>> "Elements of User Experience Design" - J.J. Garrett
>>
>> -- dave
>>
>>
>> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
>> Posted from the new ixda.org
>> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35729
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

29 Nov 2008 - 7:21am
Andy Polaine
2008

Thanks everyone - that's a great list. I'll try and cover most of
them, but they'll be interspersed between other design disciplines.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35729

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