Magnifier interface

17 Nov 2004 - 2:08pm
9 years ago
5 replies
473 reads
Listera
2004

For screenshots, everyone uses a smaller image that clicks open to a
magnified/full view. Here's an interface approach I'd never seen before:

<http://www.flip4mac.com/wmv_mac.htm>

Ziya
Nullius in Verba

Comments

17 Nov 2004 - 3:00pm
Steve Yuroff
2004

On Nov 17, 2004, at 1:08 PM, Listera wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> For screenshots, everyone uses a smaller image that clicks open to a
> magnified/full view. Here's an interface approach I'd never seen
> before:
>
> <http://www.flip4mac.com/wmv_mac.htm>
>
> Ziya
> Nullius in Verba
>
AT&T wireless also uses this on their GSM coverage maps.

http://tinyurl.com/68gkk

Steve.

17 Nov 2004 - 3:11pm
Greg Petroff
2004

http://www.idelix.com/

Gregory Petroff
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17 Nov 2004 - 3:23pm
Pradyot Rai
2004

Listera <listera at rcn.com> wrote:
>
> For screenshots, everyone uses a smaller image that clicks open to a
> magnified/full view. Here's an interface approach I'd never seen before:
>
> <http://www.flip4mac.com/wmv_mac.htm>

I think this is good for maps, flow charts kind of stuffs. But it is
too pragmatic for "explorer" interfaces. IMHO, iPhoto or Picasa are
just too good for explorer interfaces.

Prady

17 Nov 2004 - 7:24pm
bill pawlak
2004

--- Steve Yuroff <yuri at mac.com> wrote:

> AT&T wireless also uses this on their GSM coverage maps.
> http://tinyurl.com/68gkk

The fact that they also "magnifier-enabled" the fine-print on the
screen made me laugh out loud. Especially since it begins with "This
map is not a guarantee of actual coverage..." Flash-based CYA!

bill

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18 Nov 2004 - 1:36am
Manu Sharma
2003

> For screenshots, everyone uses a smaller image that clicks
open to a
> magnified/full view. Here's an interface approach I'd never
seen before:
>
> <http://www.flip4mac.com/wmv_mac.htm>

Interesting. But not very useful, particularly for interfaces
that require thumbnails. For one, it takes a long time to
download. This is fine here as there's some text to read but
if this were a product page on a shopping site, I'd be very
annoyed.

Second, it fails to convey how Flip4Mac settings work. I can
move the magnifier over each of the four boxes one by one but
it's difficult to grasp the image easily. In an enlarged image
however, I would see all elements together. I think it'd be
correct to say that one of the ways in which we interpret
information ecoded in images is by understanding each element
in relation with the other. This requires that we view them
together in one view, which isn't possible with the magnifier
tool.

Third, the thumbnail in this case isn't really one. I imagine
the magnifier would be rendered almost useless when the
thumbnail image is close to its actual size - that of a stamp.

Thumbnails are almost always a compromise. With everything
else remaining constant, both users and designers would be
happy if the former gets to view details of the image as in
its full sized version. Thumbnails exist because of imposed
constraints of space, bandwidth and time. [They are useful
only when there are too many of them and the user must employ
discretion in choosing the ones to view in full.]

The magnifier in this example doesn't resolve this compromise
fully. Nielsen's relevance-enhanced image reduction technique
[1] does that to a very small extent by creating better
thumbnails. But a pretty good solution is using JavaScript
based image tooltip for thumbnails.
http://www.theopensourcery.com/jshints.htm. Why click and drag
to view parts of an image one by one when you can just hover
and see the entire enlarged image.

Manu.
http://orangehues.com/blog

[1] http://www.useit.com/alertbox/9611.html The popular Sony
T610/616 camera cellphone uses this technique in creating
thumbnails. However, it judges relevance by whatever is at the
centre of the image. :)

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