Touchscreen Buttons

11 Feb 2009 - 10:47am
5 years ago
3 replies
2344 reads
Jeff Millington
2009

I am looking for information related to touchscreen buttons (height,
width, separation, distance from corners, etc.)

In a discussion archive from 2005, "Touchscreen target size"; it
was mentioned that ISO/ANSI recommends a size of 3/4" for the size
of touchscreen buttons.

This is for a outdoor application and could have uses without gloves
to gloves of various thicknesses.

1) Does anyone know the numbers for these standards or where else to
look for this type of information?

2) Anyone have any suggestions/recommendations for "gloved" hand
use?

3) Any experiences with right-hand biasing of the GUI when using a
7" LCD?

Thanks for your help, Jeff

Comments

11 Feb 2009 - 2:15pm
gretchen anderson
2005

Was just researching this myself.

Human Factors Design Handbook (Woodson, Tillman and Tillman) says gloved
is 3.1cm, and .64cm for non-gloved for HARD BUTTONS. (It's too old to
have touchscreen info). And clearly they mean industrial work gloves,
not medical "latex".

So, some considerations (based on previous experience):
1. Capacitive touchscreens won't work with gloves! So the 2.5cm
difference for hard buttons is a good starting place.
2. The visual size of the button need not be bigger if spacing and touch
target are adjusted. Meaning, space things out, and make the target
touch area grow into the spacing. That way you don't have to have huge
horsey buttons. Unless you like that sort of thing. ;)
3. Since the glove will obscure the screen more than a normal hand will,
spacing target farther apart is necessary.
4. I've used ~1cm for touchscreen buttons in the past with success. 3/4"
seems large for ungloved, but might be a good starting place here.
5. Prototype something like 1cm buttons with 2-3cm between and try it
using a notebook.

Not sure what your question is about right-hand biasing. But one
consideration is how pressure on the screen pushes the device in the
holding hand. So, you either deal with this in the industrial design
(center of gravity, handles, etc.) or you actually put frequent controls
center and left so people can stabilize the screen well. Of course, this
is NOT a rule, just something to consider.

______________________________________________________________________
1) Does anyone know the numbers for these standards or where else to
look for this type of information?

2) Anyone have any suggestions/recommendations for "gloved" hand
use?

3) Any experiences with right-hand biasing of the GUI when using a
7" LCD?

Thanks for your help, Jeff

11 Feb 2009 - 3:51pm
Barbara Ballard
2005

I did some work for a client recently, and found the SAP guidelines
very useful, as they echoed lots of things I learned in human factors
(including the aforementioned Woodson, Tillman, and Tillman).

http://www.sapdesignguild.org/resources/TSDesignGL/Index.htm

What I found especially interesting as I worked through them is the
degree to which they do and don't work for mobile phones. The document
was clearly written with kiosks, not phones, in mind.

~~~~
Barbara Ballard
barbara at littlespringsdesign.com 1-785-838-3003

On Wed, Feb 11, 2009 at 9:47 AM, Jeff Millington <crustypup at gmail.com> wrote:
> I am looking for information related to touchscreen buttons (height,
> width, separation, distance from corners, etc.)
>
> In a discussion archive from 2005, "Touchscreen target size"; it
> was mentioned that ISO/ANSI recommends a size of 3/4" for the size
> of touchscreen buttons.
>
> This is for a outdoor application and could have uses without gloves
> to gloves of various thicknesses.
>
> 1) Does anyone know the numbers for these standards or where else to
> look for this type of information?
>
> 2) Anyone have any suggestions/recommendations for "gloved" hand
> use?
>
> 3) Any experiences with right-hand biasing of the GUI when using a
> 7" LCD?
>
> Thanks for your help, Jeff
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
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>

11 Feb 2009 - 5:05pm
Adam Korman
2004

There were already some good responses on the other questions, so I'll
jump in on the right-hand biasing question. The short reply is yes, it
is important to think about the physical issues related to where
controls appear on a touchscreen, especially for something that's a
larger form factor (i.e., not hand-held). Things like reach, strain,
and what is obscured while reaching for the controls should be
important concerns.

In one product I worked on (with a 15" touchscreen), in field
observation we noticed that a lot of users would use the product while
sitting and resting their on arm on their elbow or forearm, pivoting
it to interact with the touchscreen rather than lifting the whole arm.
In that context, it made sense to consider how we could place controls
on the screen to avoid making people lift or move their whole arm too
much.

So, we put the primary navigation (tabs) along the right side of the
screen and biased having most buttons/controls appear in the bottom
half of the screen. This tested well, even with a lefty, who we
specifically asked about it. She naturally used her right hand to
press the tabs on the right side of the screen without any trouble or
concern. We were pretty good about sticking close to the 3/4" minimum
size guideline -- if finer accuracy were required it might have been
harder for her to use her right hand for this. She used her left hand
for most other interactions.

We only placed controls that were infrequently used in the top 1/3 of
the screen, and rarely used controls in the top-left corner. Imagine
placing a frequently used control in the top-left of the screen where
you have to reach up and across your body and obscure the whole screen
to press it. We also didn't put any controls in the top-right of the
screen -- we reserved this area for important status messages, knowing
it would never be obscured by the user while interacting with the
product.

Regards, Adam
...
Adam Korman
adam at flexid.com

On Feb 11, 2009, at 7:47 AM, Jeff Millington wrote:
>
> 3) Any experiences with right-hand biasing of the GUI when using a
> 7" LCD?

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