I'm designing in Visio for the last time

29 Mar 2009 - 6:38pm
5 years ago
16 replies
2021 reads
Michael Micheletti
2006

I'm working on a product design, under pretty intense time/money/team
pressure, using Visio for design sketches. I picked Visio because I've used
it since version 1.0 (maybe I was even a beta tester, can't remember back
that far) and am fairly expert with it. I can work fast and get lots done,
and redone, which is maybe even more important.

But today, when I attempted to copy/paste from one Visio drawing to another
Visio drawing, it pasted in a bunch of mystery shapes and junk instead of
the various dingbat font symbols and other images in my original. Yes, you
read it correctly, it failed copying from Viso to Visio.

They say that you can boil a frog if you put it in a pot with cold water and
slowly turn up the heat. Well, then I'm a frog and Visio's finally boiled me
over. Some other fuel on the burner:
- Visio's layers dialog is application modal. What a constant endless Pain
In The Butt.
- Screen and Print visibility are controlled by separate columns of
checkboxes within said PITB layers dialog. How many times have I
printed images the first time and had to go back in and uncheck stuff there?
Probably a couple trees' worth.
- The Pan and Zoom window retains control of the keyboard when
you reposition the cursor over your drawing. Think you're going to nudge
that shape with your arrow keys now that you've zoomed in? Surprise, you're
zooming in and out again instead. I appear to be unable to learn this. And
Visio appears to be unable to learn that I want to zoom in when I use
Ctrl+Plus, and zoom out using Ctrl+Minus.
- The window and web design shapes are probably ten years old and look
really tired. Translucent windows? Ribbon controls? Galleries? 3-D controls?
Mobile phones? PDAs? Aero? Sorry.
- Connections never seem to connect how I want them to, and one false move
may reroute every one of them.
- If I ungroup a shape in order to change some component visual properties
and then regroup it, the z-index changes.
- Any website big enough to require automated tools to perform a content
inventory is too big for Visio to handle the job.

Certainly the moment I go back to work after sending this I'll remember ten
other things that bug me, but you get the idea. Visio is no longer working
out very well as my quickie sketchpad for designing a new software
application.

Now I'm sure that Visio can do other wonderful tasks, like layout an office
floor plan, configure equipment in a network rack, plan HVAC ducting, create
simple electrical schematics, maybe even do database modeling. But I don't
need to do any of that stuff. I'm a user interface designer.

I have lots of alternatives for my next project. I'm good in Photoshop, but
don't normally like to sketch with it because I'm faster in Visio (mostly
because I tend to try and make things "pretty" in Photoshop, but also
because it's a pain to resize a complex screen mockup). I've made an uneasy
peace with Illustrator for symbol design work, but it frustrates me enough
that I wouldn't want to spend any more time there than I have to. I've used
InDesign to create marketing slicks and brochures, but it doesn't strike me
as optimal for software interface design. Fireworks gets a lot of good press
in this group, that may be what I try next. I'm getting increasingly adept
in Expression Blend, but it's a development tool. I sketch on paper a lot,
but mostly as quick notes to myself that no one else is expected (or able)
to read.

Maybe Microsoft will surprise me with a tight Visio upgrade that fixes
everything that bugs me. But I doubt it. Instead, I expect them to bolt on
the ability to design staircases, or roofing tile courses, or croquet
fields, or asteroid belts, or something else equally useless to me. And
maybe that's good business if there are underserved asteroid belt designers
out there. But Visio, even though we've had some good times over the years,
I think it's time we break up.

Ok, I'm all screeded-out now. Time to go back to work (in, um, Visio,
yes...),

Michael Micheletti

--
Michael Micheletti
michael.micheletti at gmail.com

Comments

29 Mar 2009 - 7:06pm
Scott McDaniel
2007

Humble recommendation to look up Visio libraries, all over the internets.
It will help with literally thousand pre-made shapes, concepts,
connectors and other
elements to help accent your Visio experience.

I usually use Omnigraffle, so it's been a while since I've used Visio
and can't address your more
usability issues, but I do wish a million times over that linking
connectors in all of these
programs would be more precise and less assuming I want the (very bad
word)ing connector
to link to the left side of an object when I wanted nothing of the
sort, you programmatic fascists!

Cheers,
Scott

On Sun, Mar 29, 2009 at 7:38 PM, Michael Micheletti
<michael.micheletti at gmail.com> wrote:
> I'm working on a product design, under pretty intense time/money/team
> pressure, using Visio for design sketches. I picked Visio because I've used
> it since version 1.0 (maybe I was even a beta tester, can't remember back
> that far) and am fairly expert with it. I can work fast and get lots done,
> and redone, which is maybe even more important.
>
> But today, when I attempted to copy/paste from one Visio drawing to another
> Visio drawing, it pasted in a bunch of mystery shapes and junk instead of
> the various dingbat font symbols and other images in my original. Yes, you
> read it correctly, it failed copying from Viso to Visio.
>
> They say that you can boil a frog if you put it in a pot with cold water and
> slowly turn up the heat. Well, then I'm a frog and Visio's finally boiled me
> over. Some other fuel on the burner:
> - Visio's layers dialog is application modal. What a constant endless Pain
> In The Butt.
> - Screen and Print visibility are controlled by separate columns of
> checkboxes within said PITB layers dialog. How many times have I
> printed images the first time and had to go back in and uncheck stuff there?
> Probably a couple trees' worth.
> - The Pan and Zoom window retains control of the keyboard when
> you reposition the cursor over your drawing. Think you're going to nudge
> that shape with your arrow keys now that you've zoomed in? Surprise, you're
> zooming in and out again instead. I appear to be unable to learn this. And
> Visio appears to be unable to learn that I want to zoom in when I use
> Ctrl+Plus, and zoom out using Ctrl+Minus.
> - The window and web design shapes are probably ten years old and look
> really tired. Translucent windows? Ribbon controls? Galleries? 3-D controls?
> Mobile phones? PDAs? Aero? Sorry.
> - Connections never seem to connect how I want them to, and one false move
> may reroute every one of them.
> - If I ungroup a shape in order to change some component visual properties
> and then regroup it, the z-index changes.
> - Any website big enough to require automated tools to perform a content
> inventory is too big for Visio to handle the job.
>
> Certainly the moment I go back to work after sending this I'll remember ten
> other things that bug me, but you get the idea. Visio is no longer working
> out very well as my quickie sketchpad for designing a new software
> application.
>
> Now I'm sure that Visio can do other wonderful tasks, like layout an office
> floor plan, configure equipment in a network rack, plan HVAC ducting, create
> simple electrical schematics, maybe even do database modeling. But I don't
> need to do any of that stuff. I'm a user interface designer.
>
> I have lots of alternatives for my next project. I'm good in Photoshop, but
> don't normally like to sketch with it because I'm faster in Visio (mostly
> because I tend to try and make things "pretty" in Photoshop, but also
> because it's a pain to resize a complex screen mockup). I've made an uneasy
> peace with Illustrator for symbol design work, but it frustrates me enough
> that I wouldn't want to spend any more time there than I have to. I've used
> InDesign to create marketing slicks and brochures, but it doesn't strike me
> as optimal for software interface design. Fireworks gets a lot of good press
> in this group, that may be what I try next. I'm getting increasingly adept
> in Expression Blend, but it's a development tool. I sketch on paper a lot,
> but mostly as quick notes to myself that no one else is expected (or able)
> to read.
>
> Maybe Microsoft will surprise me with a tight Visio upgrade that fixes
> everything that bugs me. But I doubt it. Instead, I expect them to bolt on
> the ability to design staircases, or roofing tile courses, or croquet
> fields, or asteroid belts, or something else equally useless to me. And
> maybe that's good business if there are underserved asteroid belt designers
> out there. But Visio, even though we've had some good times over the years,
> I think it's time we break up.
>
> Ok, I'm all screeded-out now. Time to go back to work (in, um, Visio,
> yes...),
>
> Michael Micheletti
>
> --
> Michael Micheletti
> michael.micheletti at gmail.com
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
"I have mad skills at doing spazzy things." - Janiene West

29 Mar 2009 - 9:10pm
markhhoff@earth...
2006

Sorry you¹re having trouble ­ I¹ve never had that particular problem, but
sure I will, someday.

I¹ve used Guui¹s Visio widgets and Nick Finck¹s excellent Visio tools with
success.

Fireworks is a good at wireframing, especially if since it¹s got a range of
XP widgets already built in. Also with FW, you can export pages to files as
one document ­ a little like Layer Comps in Photoshop.

I¹ve also found Axure to be fast and easy to learn, but there¹s also cost
factor. I¹m sure others on the list will jump in workarounds and
suggestions.

Good luck-

Mark Hoffman

30 Mar 2009 - 12:12am
Nasir Barday
2006

Dude, I feel your pain. I made a similar transition to Fireworks two years
ago and it was like seeing the light of God. Stuff to try while you get
tooled up for Fireworks:

- Use Background Pages instead of layers. Not sure how you're structuring
your layers, but I tend to start with common elements and share those layers
across the tabs I want. In Visio, this means putting those common elements
on a Background page and setting it as the background for pages that will
pick up those elements

- Instead of Ctrl-Plus and Ctrl-Minus, try Ctrl+Shift+click to zoom in, and
Ctrl+W to fit the entire page on screen (a crude zoom out). I think a
Ctrl+Shift+Right-click does a zoom out, but I don't have my Windows-based
work machine handy.

Fireworks sales pitch:
Using Visio to make flowcharts is tolerable, but for large-scale mockups, it
falls flat. I let Product Managers run loose with Visio for smaller
compoents while I tackle the larger parts of projects with Fireworks. It's
not perfect, but it is many times more efficient than Visio, and you can set
up 'slices,' regions of your mockups, to be exported for use in
documentation. Want to show a cropped view of that pop-up menu? Piece of
cake. Make a few edits to said pop-up menu? Just re-export and that image is
updated. It's also easy to zip trough pages (PgUp and PgDown) to show people
the various states of the app. A quick tutorial on Lynda.com (with a paid
subscription) will get you up to speed in a day, or even a nice evening
after hours ...

Good luck, and let us know if you need more help! I'm sure the catharsis
from your initial post was all you needed though :-).

- Nasir

30 Mar 2009 - 1:42am
Anonymous

Sound like the typical microsoft experience :-)
Get a mac and put omnigraffle on it. You will never look back.

Apple & Omnigroup, you know where to send the checks.

/Johan

On Mar 30, 2009, at 1:38 AM, Michael Micheletti wrote:

> I'm working on a product design, under pretty intense time/money/team
> pressure, using Visio for design sketches. I picked Visio because
> I've used
> it since version 1.0 (maybe I was even a beta tester, can't remember
> back
> that far) and am fairly expert with it. I can work fast and get lots
> done,
> and redone, which is maybe even more important.
>
> But today, when I attempted to copy/paste from one Visio drawing to
> another
> Visio drawing, it pasted in a bunch of mystery shapes and junk
> instead of
> the various dingbat font symbols and other images in my original.
> Yes, you
> read it correctly, it failed copying from Viso to Visio.
>
> They say that you can boil a frog if you put it in a pot with cold
> water and
> slowly turn up the heat. Well, then I'm a frog and Visio's finally
> boiled me
> over. Some other fuel on the burner:
> - Visio's layers dialog is application modal. What a constant
> endless Pain
> In The Butt.
> - Screen and Print visibility are controlled by separate columns of
> checkboxes within said PITB layers dialog. How many times have I
> printed images the first time and had to go back in and uncheck
> stuff there?
> Probably a couple trees' worth.
> - The Pan and Zoom window retains control of the keyboard when
> you reposition the cursor over your drawing. Think you're going to
> nudge
> that shape with your arrow keys now that you've zoomed in? Surprise,
> you're
> zooming in and out again instead. I appear to be unable to learn
> this. And
> Visio appears to be unable to learn that I want to zoom in when I use
> Ctrl+Plus, and zoom out using Ctrl+Minus.
> - The window and web design shapes are probably ten years old and look
> really tired. Translucent windows? Ribbon controls? Galleries? 3-D
> controls?
> Mobile phones? PDAs? Aero? Sorry.
> - Connections never seem to connect how I want them to, and one
> false move
> may reroute every one of them.
> - If I ungroup a shape in order to change some component visual
> properties
> and then regroup it, the z-index changes.
> - Any website big enough to require automated tools to perform a
> content
> inventory is too big for Visio to handle the job.
>
> Certainly the moment I go back to work after sending this I'll
> remember ten
> other things that bug me, but you get the idea. Visio is no longer
> working
> out very well as my quickie sketchpad for designing a new software
> application.
>
> Now I'm sure that Visio can do other wonderful tasks, like layout an
> office
> floor plan, configure equipment in a network rack, plan HVAC
> ducting, create
> simple electrical schematics, maybe even do database modeling. But I
> don't
> need to do any of that stuff. I'm a user interface designer.
>
> I have lots of alternatives for my next project. I'm good in
> Photoshop, but
> don't normally like to sketch with it because I'm faster in Visio
> (mostly
> because I tend to try and make things "pretty" in Photoshop, but also
> because it's a pain to resize a complex screen mockup). I've made an
> uneasy
> peace with Illustrator for symbol design work, but it frustrates me
> enough
> that I wouldn't want to spend any more time there than I have to.
> I've used
> InDesign to create marketing slicks and brochures, but it doesn't
> strike me
> as optimal for software interface design. Fireworks gets a lot of
> good press
> in this group, that may be what I try next. I'm getting increasingly
> adept
> in Expression Blend, but it's a development tool. I sketch on paper
> a lot,
> but mostly as quick notes to myself that no one else is expected (or
> able)
> to read.
>
> Maybe Microsoft will surprise me with a tight Visio upgrade that fixes
> everything that bugs me. But I doubt it. Instead, I expect them to
> bolt on
> the ability to design staircases, or roofing tile courses, or croquet
> fields, or asteroid belts, or something else equally useless to me.
> And
> maybe that's good business if there are underserved asteroid belt
> designers
> out there. But Visio, even though we've had some good times over the
> years,
> I think it's time we break up.
>
> Ok, I'm all screeded-out now. Time to go back to work (in, um, Visio,
> yes...),
>
> Michael Micheletti
>
> --
> Michael Micheletti
> michael.micheletti at gmail.com
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

30 Mar 2009 - 2:32am
Andy Polaine
2008

I'm an Omigraffle fan too.

I tried Visio again recently when helping a friend out with something
really simple and it took ages (I haven't used it for many years,
admittedly). I whipped it up in under an hour in Omnigraffle.

Omnigraffle can import (and export) the Visio xml format, so you might
be able to make the switch fairly easy. You'll have to buy a Mac of
course, but hey, there's always VirtualBox and Boot Camp so you can
relive your Windows pain if you feel the need.

Best,

Andy

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Andy Polaine

Interaction & Experience Design +
Service Design Research +
Writing

Twitter: apolaine
Skype: apolaine

http://www.polaine.com
http://www.designersreviewofbooks.com
http://www.omnium.net.au
http://www.antirom.com

30 Mar 2009 - 3:55am
Alan James Salmoni
2008

Just out of curiosity, can Fireworks handle flow diagrams like visio
(particularly, when a line is connected with a box and the box is
moved, does the line stay connected)?

I genuinely want to know - I've used FireWorks myself but nothing in
this way (tended to use OpenOffice draw for that) and at work we're
considering what tools we need to do our jobs here. Advice would be
very welcome!

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=40696

30 Mar 2009 - 4:31am
martinpolley
2007

You're right, it's not the ideal tool for the job. But if you're stuck with
it, the GUUUI stencil that someone else mentioned is excellent. And Martijn
van Welie's Visio macros <http://welie.com/visio/> are a lifesaver
(especially the one that lets you duplicate a whole page).

Cheers,

Martin Polley
Technical writer, interaction designer
+972 52 3864280
Twitter: martinpolley
<http://capcloud.com/>

On Mon, Mar 30, 2009 at 2:38 AM, Michael Micheletti <
michael.micheletti at gmail.com> wrote:
<snip>

> I'm working on a product design, under pretty intense time/money/team
> pressure, using Visio for design sketches.

<snip>

30 Mar 2009 - 5:33am
stepheneighmey
2008

what about inDesign?

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=40696

30 Mar 2009 - 8:44am
Michael Kay
2009

I never loved Visio and have only used it to conform to others when
collaborating.
I have been using inDesign for a while to create wireframes. It's
master pages are very handy, and it's just the type of tool that I
am comfortable with after years of graphic design. For charting I
turn to Illustrator because I have it and am comfortable with it.
Though you have to manipulate all the connections by hand, it's not
so difficult as you might think. I think which tool is best is a
subjective choice.

I have been wanting to try Fireworks for this, but it's just got too
much UI dedicated to images rather than layout. I should probably give
it another try and look into OmniGraffle too.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=40696

30 Mar 2009 - 10:50am
Nasir Barday
2006

In my experience, Fireworks works best for pixel-accurate prototyping (and
has the handy Master page feature, borrowed from InDesign). It even has some
handy tools for layout-- the CS4 beta had a feature that lets you space
elements with a certain pixel margin, for example.

OmniGraffle and Visio are better tools for diagramming and flowcharting.

Use each of these tools for these purposes, and you'll want to throw less
things at people.

As for InDesign, its strong suit is, as mentioned above, layout. It's good
for annotating slices of the mockups you make in Fireworks with a story.
Haven't tried this yet, but my idea workflow would be creating a vision in
Fireworks, setting up 'slices' for automated export, and having them update
right in InDesign.

- N

30 Mar 2009 - 12:43pm
Håkan Reis
2006

For sketching I always use balsamiq now. It really has the simplicity to
sketch out the basics. It's so simple that its great to use in colaboration
with the customers and the users, especially in agile projects.

But for more complex sketches and flows its not the ideal tool... yet. But
one good thing about it is that the xml format (bmml) is specified and open
so some tooling might be possible to transport the sketches to a more
complex tool like Omigraffle or anything else that works for you.

Also I'm thrilled to se what MS came up with in
sketchflow<http://electricbeach.org/?p=145>,
as some of my projects are in wpf and silverlight.

// Håkan
---
Håkan Reis
User experience and .NET Consultant at Dotway AB
Øredev Program Committee

Our conference || http://oredev.org - It's going to be great in 2009
My company || http://dotway.se
My blog || http://blog.reis.se

On Mon, Mar 30, 2009 at 17:50, Nasir Barday
<nbarday+ixda at gmail.com<nbarday%2Bixda at gmail.com>
> wrote:

> In my experience, Fireworks works best for pixel-accurate prototyping (and
> has the handy Master page feature, borrowed from InDesign). It even has
> some
> handy tools for layout-- the CS4 beta had a feature that lets you space
> elements with a certain pixel margin, for example.
>
> OmniGraffle and Visio are better tools for diagramming and flowcharting.
>
> Use each of these tools for these purposes, and you'll want to throw less
> things at people.
>
> As for InDesign, its strong suit is, as mentioned above, layout. It's good
> for annotating slices of the mockups you make in Fireworks with a story.
> Haven't tried this yet, but my idea workflow would be creating a vision in
> Fireworks, setting up 'slices' for automated export, and having them update
> right in InDesign.
>
> - N
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

30 Mar 2009 - 5:14pm
niklasw
2005

I couldn't agree more to Håkans comment about SketchFlow. The whole
Visio w/f to interactive prototype work flow might be just soooo much
easier with this.

http://videos.visitmix.com/MIX09/C01F Its a somewhat bad demo as it
looks like they try to do a web site inside of an application but you
get the picture.

It fits very well with our studio work flow set-up with ixd graphic
designer developer.

And it doesn't exclude CS stuff either. Blend3 eats both bitmaps and
vector graphics from CS natively now.

I see a future killer here if SketchFlow delivers what it promises.

.Niklas

twitter.com/niklasw

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=40696

31 Mar 2009 - 9:42am
Stew Dean
2007

In Visio the easiest way to zoom in and out is to use a wheel mouse.
Press Control then move the wheel to zoom in and out.

Press shift to pan left and right.

Visio's layers are a joke. Instead it's better to use multiple layers of
backgrounds. Backgrounds can use different backgrounds and, with a little
patience, can be used as layers. You can't turn these on and off when needed
though.

I have never used any of the shapes in Visio (well maybe a mouse pointer
once or twice). Instead I have a library built up from others libraries and
my own items - once mastered Visio's masters are quite powerful (if not
entirely free of bugs).

There is much wrong with Visio - no merging documents, not paste in place,
lots of annoying bugs and needless features. Having used both Omnigraffle
and Visio in anger I feel both have major short comings but, under pressure,
I find Visio twice as quick to use. The perfect user experience tool has yet
to be built.
--
Stewart Dean

31 Mar 2009 - 9:47am
Michael Micheletti
2006

You are all generous with good advice and tips. I'm especially intrigued by
the idea of Blend 3 becoming more of a design tool. Thank you for the kind
help,

Michael

On Tue, Mar 31, 2009 at 7:42 AM, Stewart Dean <stewdean at gmail.com> wrote:

> In Visio the easiest way to zoom in and out is to use a wheel mouse.
> Press Control then move the wheel to zoom in and out.
>
> Press shift to pan left and right.
>
> Visio's layers are a joke. Instead it's better to use multiple layers of
> backgrounds. Backgrounds can use different backgrounds and, with a little
> patience, can be used as layers. You can't turn these on and off when needed
> though.
>
> I have never used any of the shapes in Visio (well maybe a mouse pointer
> once or twice). Instead I have a library built up from others libraries and
> my own items - once mastered Visio's masters are quite powerful (if not
> entirely free of bugs).
>
> There is much wrong with Visio - no merging documents, not paste in place,
> lots of annoying bugs and needless features. Having used both Omnigraffle
> and Visio in anger I feel both have major short comings but, under pressure,
> I find Visio twice as quick to use. The perfect user experience tool has yet
> to be built.
> --
> Stewart Dean
>

--
Michael Micheletti
michael.micheletti at gmail.com

31 Mar 2009 - 10:57am
Dante Murphy
2006

RE: Paste in Place...

Check out the "VISIO Stuff" on www.welie.com for a macro that you can use to enable paste in place. It's so easy to do I've memorized it, and works perfectly. At least that's ONE problem solved.

Dante Murphy | VP/D User Experience| D I G I T A S H E A L T H
100 Penn Square East| Wanamaker Building, 11th Floor | Philadelphia, PA 19107 | USA
Email: dmurphy at digitashealth.com
www.digitashealth.com

6 Apr 2009 - 4:15pm
jabbett
2008

I, too, have been struggling with Visio, mostly around printing (it
can't collate, for goodness sake!) and PDF generation (Visio and
PDFMaker don't play nice).

So, inspired by this thread, I've been reviewing alternatives. I tried
Balsamiq again at my boss's suggestion, but I'd be giving up too much
of Visio's functionality to be efficient with it. Plus, it's just too
unpleasant to look at ... a choice between Comic Sans and "system
font" is not a choice.

Then I took a look at Illustrator (and a promising open-source rival,
Inkscape) when I realized: pages! Visio uses pages! These other
illustration tools don't. Illustrator has "artboards," sure, but
they're nowhere as easy as to manipulate (for a newbie, at least).
Inkscape only works with one page per document. (I will, however,
recommend it as a good alternative to costly Adobe products.)

Given the ease of Visio's page model, the great set of wireframing
stencils I use, and the nice set of macros from welie.com I've just
adopted, I think I'll be sticking with Visio and keeping my fingers
crossed that MS's next version will finally upgrade it from bastard
step-child of the Office family of products.

-Jonathan

On Tue, Mar 31, 2009 at 11:57 AM, Dante Murphy
<dmurphy at digitashealth.com> wrote:
> RE: Paste in Place...
>
> Check out the "VISIO Stuff" on www.welie.com for a macro that you can use to enable paste in place.  It's so easy to do I've memorized it, and works perfectly.  At least that's ONE problem solved.
>
> Dante Murphy | VP/D User Experience| D I G I T A S  H E A L T H
> 100 Penn Square East| Wanamaker Building, 11th Floor | Philadelphia, PA 19107 | USA
> Email: dmurphy at digitashealth.com
> www.digitashealth.com
>
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