"Whiteboard" goes poetic about design

20 Dec 2004 - 1:03pm
10 years ago
4 replies
624 reads
Elizabeth Buie
2004

As some of you know, I edit a column in ACM's "interactions" magazine
(http//www.acm.org/interactions), a column of opinion and sometimes
whimsy, aimed at designers who are not IxD or usability specialists but
who do have a clue and want to know more. The column, "Whiteboard," is
now five years old. To celebrate the milestone and welcome the new
editors of "interactions," I plan something a wee bit different for the
next issue to be written.

I hereby invite you guys to send me a haiku or two, or perhaps a limerick
or two, that express a musing, rant, rave, dream (etc.) on some aspect of
usability or interaction design about which you feel strongly. It could
address process, product, or anything else that gets you going. Must be
clean, or at most mildly suggestive à la the brothers Hyde(*). Irony and
dry humor are especially welcome.

I am inviting both haiku and limericks because I'm not sure which will
work better. I plan to limit the column to one or the other, depending on
which one strikes me as a better fit once I have the submissions; and I
will choose entries according to space limitations, appropriateness,
relevance, and my own subjective reaction to the poems. If you send me a
contribution privately, I will assume it to be for publication unless you
tell me otherwise. If you post a contribution here and do not include
explicit permission for publication in ACM's "interactions" magazine, I
will contact you to ask for permission before I use it.

The deadline for sending submissions for publication is January 31, 2005.

Elizabeth

(*)
"There was a young fellow named Hyde,
Who fell down a privy and died.
His unfortunate brother
Then fell down another,
And now they're interred side by side."
- from The Lure of the Limerick, an anthology by William
S.Baring-Gould

--
Elizabeth Buie
Computer Sciences Corporation
Rockville, Maryland, USA
+1.301.921.3326

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Comments

20 Dec 2004 - 1:43pm
mtumi
2004

lengthy FAQs
hunks of ponderous answers
I scroll forever

there once was a marketing maven
who, if asked to color a raven
would never choose black
or the simplest tact
and then argue that choice without cavin'

little poetic license on the limerick. :-)

MT

On Dec 20, 2004, at 2:03 PM, Elizabeth Buie wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> As some of you know, I edit a column in ACM's "interactions" magazine
> (http//www.acm.org/interactions), a column of opinion and sometimes
> whimsy, aimed at designers who are not IxD or usability specialists but
> who do have a clue and want to know more. The column, "Whiteboard,"
> is
> now five years old. To celebrate the milestone and welcome the new
> editors of "interactions," I plan something a wee bit different for the
> next issue to be written.
>
> I hereby invite you guys to send me a haiku or two, or perhaps a
> limerick
> or two, that express a musing, rant, rave, dream (etc.) on some aspect
> of
> usability or interaction design about which you feel strongly. It
> could
> address process, product, or anything else that gets you going. Must
> be
> clean, or at most mildly suggestive à la the brothers Hyde(*). Irony
> and
> dry humor are especially welcome.
>
> I am inviting both haiku and limericks because I'm not sure which will
> work better. I plan to limit the column to one or the other,
> depending on
> which one strikes me as a better fit once I have the submissions; and I
> will choose entries according to space limitations, appropriateness,
> relevance, and my own subjective reaction to the poems. If you send
> me a
> contribution privately, I will assume it to be for publication unless
> you
> tell me otherwise. If you post a contribution here and do not include
> explicit permission for publication in ACM's "interactions" magazine, I
> will contact you to ask for permission before I use it.
>
> The deadline for sending submissions for publication is January 31,
> 2005.
>
> Elizabeth
>
>
> (*)
> "There was a young fellow named Hyde,
> Who fell down a privy and died.
> His unfortunate brother
> Then fell down another,
> And now they're interred side by side."
> - from The Lure of the Limerick, an anthology by William
> S.Baring-Gould
>
> --
> Elizabeth Buie
> Computer Sciences Corporation
> Rockville, Maryland, USA
> +1.301.921.3326
>
>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
> -----------------
> This is a PRIVATE message. If you are not the intended recipient,
> please
> delete without copying and kindly advise us by e-mail of the mistake in
> delivery. NOTE: Regardless of content, this e-mail shall not operate to
> bind CSC to any order or other contract unless pursuant to explicit
> written agreement or government initiative expressly permitting the
> use of
> e-mail for such purpose.
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
> -----------------
>
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20 Dec 2004 - 3:14pm
Ben Hunt
2004

There was an IA from Devizes
Devised web sites of various sizes
Some sites were small, and no use at all
While others were huge and won prizes

(Devizes is a place in Cornwall, England)

20 Dec 2004 - 3:21pm
Elizabeth Buie
2004

Ben Hunt writes:

>There was an IA from Devizes...

LOL!

I've been through Devizes several times (driving between Stonehenge and
Avebury, of course -- and it's in Wiltshire, not Cornwall :-), and I know
the other two limericks.

I do have to introduce a note of realism here: Would you please revise
the first line? Many readers won't know what "IA" stands for.

Elizabeth
--
Elizabeth Buie
Computer Sciences Corporation
Rockville, Maryland, USA
+1.301.921.3326

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is a PRIVATE message. If you are not the intended recipient, please
delete without copying and kindly advise us by e-mail of the mistake in
delivery. NOTE: Regardless of content, this e-mail shall not operate to
bind CSC to any order or other contract unless pursuant to explicit
written agreement or government initiative expressly permitting the use of
e-mail for such purpose.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Ben Hunt" <ben
@scratchmedia.co.uk>
12/20/04 04:14 PM

To: "'Michael Tuminello'" <mt at motiontek.com>, Elizabeth
Buie/CIV/CSC at CSC
cc: <discuss at interactiondesigners.com>
Subject: RE: [ID Discuss] "Whiteboard" goes poetic about
design

There was an IA from Devizes
Devised web sites of various sizes
Some sites were small, and no use at all
While others were huge and won prizes

(Devizes is a place in Cornwall, England)

21 Dec 2004 - 11:45am
Lada Gorlenko
2004

EB> I hereby invite you guys to send me a haiku or two, or perhaps a limerick
EB> or two,

1. On design (in)visibility

A designer from god knows where
Liked his work crystal clear and bare:
No splash, no Flash,
No jargon or trash -
No one even knew sites were there!

2. On design (im)maturity

To improve your design usability,
Exercise intellect and stability:
Label grouchy users
Either 'pinheads' or 'losers',
And provide 'Dummy Service' facility.

3. On design (dis)integration

One designer (and ex-engineer)
Had few pints of excellent beer.
The design came top-notch,
But he added a scotch -
And (or dear!) it turned out queer...

Finally (sorry, could not resist), a small personal touch:

One designer nicknamed 'Problem Solver'
Was an eminent method evolver:
He could cut, he could stitch,
And his marketing pitch
Had a place for a heavy revolver.

Lada

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