optimized keyboards(lay-outs) target users?

23 Apr 2009 - 3:02am
5 years ago
3 replies
566 reads
majid dadgar
2008

Greetings,

there has been a discussion here on who might be target user of redesigned
optimized keyboards (lay-outs) here: professional typist or the one who is
about to get familiar with typing with keyboards?! that is if I'm optimizing
a keyboard in user centred design process, which of those two should be the
one who gets involved in UCD iterative process and gathering feedbacks. One
side says: if a professional typist could type with some optimized lay-out
well, then the one with less knowledge of computer should enter text well
too; the other side says vice versa. I am saying which one would bear more
cognitive load while using keyboards? and also which type of target user is
less straight-forward using keyboard and faces interruptions inter-acting
with non-optimized keyboards? definitely the one who is struggling typing,
and not the pro.! any idea on this topic would help us to see what others
comment and think.

Best,
Majid.

--
Industrial Design, BA,
University of Tehran.
----- - - - - - - - - - - -
P.O.Box: 15635-119, Tehran, Iran.
----- - - - - - - - - - - -
: : once upon a time Design : :
http://1to3Design.blogspot.com
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Comments

23 Apr 2009 - 3:02am
majid dadgar
2008

Greetings,

there has been a discussion here on who might be target user of redesigned
optimized keyboards (lay-outs) here: professional typist or the one who is
about to get familiar with typing with keyboards?! that is if I'm optimizing
a keyboard in user centred design process, which of those two should be the
one who gets involved in UCD iterative process and gathering feedbacks. One
side says: if a professional typist could type with some optimized lay-out
well, then the one with less knowledge of computer should enter text well
too; the other side says vice versa. I am saying which one would bear more
cognitive load while using keyboards? and also which type of target user is
less straight-forward using keyboard and faces interruptions inter-acting
with non-optimized keyboards? definitely the one who is struggling typing,
and not the pro.! any idea on this topic would help us to see what others
comment and think.

Best,
Majid.

--
Industrial Design, BA,
University of Tehran.
----- - - - - - - - - - - -
P.O.Box: 15635-119, Tehran, Iran.
----- - - - - - - - - - - -
: : once upon a time Design : :
http://1to3Design.blogspot.com
----- - - - - - - - - - - -

23 Apr 2009 - 9:07am
Jeff Geurts
2009

If a keyboard layout is optimized such that a professional typist can
type much faster, then I feel the design would benefit a newcommer in
the same way.

However, the same optimization might negatively impact the learning
curve - is that acceptable? It depends on your goals. Are you aiming
to improve typing speeds, shorten ramp-up, or both?

[ Maybe this is all moot ... perhaps any design that could improve
the typing speed for the average typist (ie- a design that does not
rely on exceptional memory and recall, or exceptionally long fingers,
etc) would naturally make more sense to a first time user, and thus be
easier to learn ]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=41452

23 Apr 2009 - 10:55am
majid dadgar
2008

Jeff,

the point's that it might negatively impact learning curve for the newcomer
if it is optimized for the pro.. and the question is, if a keyboard lay-out
is optimized for a newcomer, would it negatively impact pro. typist
performance? Both sides perspectives and needs, I guess, should be
considered but in a way that none is impacted negatively.
what I'm intending to do is bottom-up UCD process: that lay-outs are first
tested by novices, and passing different stages, and within each iterative
cycles of UCD, we will come to the pro. typists to test lay-outs.
one of the goals is to lessen cognitive load on novices, and shorten
learning curve and also make it gradual rising. most of the typists rely on
recalling and not looking at keyboard lay-out but just repeating habit of
typing! so I think that if set those as target users, they will deviate the
project, while they must not be forgotten!

On Thu, Apr 23, 2009 at 11:37 AM, Jeff Geurts <geurts at gmail.com> wrote:

> If a keyboard layout is optimized such that a professional typist can
> type much faster, then I feel the design would benefit a newcommer in
> the same way.
>
> However, the same optimization might negatively impact the learning
> curve - is that acceptable? It depends on your goals. Are you aiming
> to improve typing speeds, shorten ramp-up, or both?
>
> [ Maybe this is all moot ... perhaps any design that could improve
> the typing speed for the average typist (ie- a design that does not
> rely on exceptional memory and recall, or exceptionally long fingers,
> etc) would naturally make more sense to a first time user, and thus be
> easier to learn ]
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=41452
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
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--
Industrial Design, BA,
University of Tehran.
----- - - - - - - - - - - -
P.O.Box: 15635-119, Tehran, Iran.
----- - - - - - - - - - - -
: : once upon a time Design : :
http://1to3Design.blogspot.com
----- - - - - - - - - - - -

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