Biz models and design Shaun Inman's Fever

18 Jun 2009 - 9:53am
5 years ago
5 replies
1107 reads
Peter Merholz
2004

On Jun 18, 2009, at 1:19 PM, Vishal Iyer wrote:

> Business model is most definitely *not* a part of design

Wow. This statement made me choke on my ale (I'm in London).

Business model is definitely part of the customer experience, as Jeff
Bezos so admirably pointed out:
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/09_09/b4121034637296.htm
""Internally, customer service is a component of customer experience,"
he says. "Customer experience includes having the lowest price, having
the fastest delivery, having it reliable enough so that you don't need
to contact [anyone]. Then you save customer service for those truly
unusual situations. You know, I got my book and it's missing pages 47
through 58," he says, breaking into a booming laugh."

Business model is very much the success of iPod -- the chain of
services that allow you to easily acquire music and get it on your
player.

Business model is the thing thwarting Tivo's success, no matter how
brilliant it's user interface design.

We as designers have a lot to contribute toward thinking through
business model implications.

--peter

Comments

18 Jun 2009 - 10:14am
Joshua Porter
2007

I think a good question to ask is "what is a designer responsible for?"

Designers are usually *not* responsible for coming up or even
modifying a business model.

But they had better *understand* the business model, because it
absolutely affects design.

As a consultant, I tend to toe the line...and I help out with some
parts of business models as they relate to design.

But when I'm designing, actually creating interfaces, it's not my job
to tell the business folks what to do...business models are their
specialty (doesn't mean they're great at it). My job is to translate
the business model they've created into screens that support it.

So, in the example of Amazon...if lowest price and fastest delivery
are part of the business model, a designer might look for ways to
reinforce those ideas/messages in the interface and shopping workflow.

And, sure, a designer might have an insight into how to improve the
reliability of the shipping process or some other business concern,
but that's not the job they're being paid to do.

Cheers,

Josh

On Jun 18, 2009, at 11:53 AM, Peter Merholz wrote:

>
> On Jun 18, 2009, at 1:19 PM, Vishal Iyer wrote:
>
>> Business model is most definitely *not* a part of design
>
> Wow. This statement made me choke on my ale (I'm in London).
>
> Business model is definitely part of the customer experience, as
> Jeff Bezos so admirably pointed out:
> http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/09_09/b4121034637296.htm
> ""Internally, customer service is a component of customer
> experience," he says. "Customer experience includes having the
> lowest price, having the fastest delivery, having it reliable enough
> so that you don't need to contact [anyone]. Then you save customer
> service for those truly unusual situations. You know, I got my book
> and it's missing pages 47 through 58," he says, breaking into a
> booming laugh."
>
> Business model is very much the success of iPod -- the chain of
> services that allow you to easily acquire music and get it on your
> player.
>
> Business model is the thing thwarting Tivo's success, no matter how
> brilliant it's user interface design.
>
> We as designers have a lot to contribute toward thinking through
> business model implications.
>
> --peter
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
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18 Jun 2009 - 3:47pm
Oliver Reichenstein
2009

Business model is indeed not a part of design, but a part of user
experience. Unless you want to call your MBA type of guys that are
responsible for the business model "business designers" or
"business experience designers", Shaun is most definitely right.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=42957

18 Jun 2009 - 5:48pm
Jared M. Spool
2003

On Jun 18, 2009, at 12:14 PM, Joshua Porter wrote:

> I think a good question to ask is "what is a designer responsible
> for?"
>
> Designers are usually *not* responsible for coming up or even
> modifying a business model.

Which is why "what is a designer responsible for?" is the wrong
question.

The right questions are:

+ Who is on the team?
+ What skills do they have?
+ What is the team responsible for?

The best designs are going to have the right skills, which include
both business and interaction design. It doesn't really matter if
these skills are a single person or 20, as long as the team works
together effectively.

I think we need to move away from roles and start thinking in terms of
teams and their skills.

Jared

Jared M. Spool
User Interface Engineering
510 Turnpike St., Suite 102, North Andover, MA 01845
e: jspool at uie.com p: +1 978 327 5561
http://uie.com Blog: http://uie.com/brainsparks Twitter: @jmspool
UIE Roadshow: Seattle, Denver, DC in June: http://is.gd/gxwe

18 Jun 2009 - 8:02pm
Jay Morgan
2006

A project team has to represent, to communicate - explicitly and
implicitly - the services and value(s) constituting a business model
to potential customers.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=42957

18 Jun 2009 - 6:19pm
Steven Diebold
2009

I think you will see a new type of workforce emerging that joins
together the left and right brain teams to engage is cross
disciplinary functions. Most companies are now looking for MFA/MBA
types because there are already enough finance MBA types on the
market. The scarcity of creative MBA's is abundant.

The key thing for a designer to learn is what kinds of questions do
they need to ask in order to add value to the business model.
Sometimes models are so interconnected and interdependent that its
hard to see all the parts since a designer does not get to see all
that many times. However, sometimes the designer is involved in
reviewing business process design and that can tell you a lot about
the business model. Designers do need to understand the mechanics of
a value chain to add value to it but they don't have to be know how
to invent them. I think a creative person can learn to provoke the
mba type to think about new ways which can lead to a lot of value. 2
minds are always better than one. I think you will find most
business people happy to discuss a business model but be careful how
you approach giving input until you've earned respect in giving
advice in this area or they will dismiss your ideas.

The is business modeling and a business model. They are not the same
thing. Business modeling is the actual business processes of how
everything works in action while the business model is just the flow
or overview of it all as a way to view it at a distance.

UI people can add a lot of value to business modeling part because
its about FLOW and experiences during that flow. They can really help
out a lot in diagramming visually so people can really grasp how it
all comes together and works. Information architecture can really add
great value here.

hope that helps.

steven diebold
http://www.ideaintoaction.com

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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