The Business of Design [was: Shaun Inman's Fever]

18 Jun 2009 - 4:43pm
5 years ago
5 replies
587 reads
Todd Warfel
2003

On Jun 18, 2009, at 12:20 PM, Vishal Iyer wrote:

> That does not make business models a part of design. On the
> contrary, design is a part of the business model.

I fail to see how design can be a part of the business model w/o the
business model being part of Design. Not taking into account the
business model is a Design failure.

I think Jared Spool's talk on the Amazon is a perfect example. The
fact that Amazon is able to turn inventory 25 days faster than it's
credit line, floating cash, making interest instead of paying interest
is by Design. It's not an accident. It's by Design. They've designed
their business model that way.

In the case of Fever, the decision to make it $30 and whether or not
to offer a demo is by design. Shaun designed the business model for
Fever that way. He may have very good reason to do so, but it's still
by design.

So, exactly how is the business model not part of Design?

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
Principal Design Researcher
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
Twitter: zakiwarfel
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

Comments

18 Jun 2009 - 5:28pm
Vishal Subraman...
2005

> I think Jared Spool's talk on the Amazon is a perfect example. The fact
that Amazon is able to turn inventory 25 days > faster than it's credit
line, floating cash, making interest instead of paying interest is by
Design. It's not an accident. It's > by Design. They've designed their
business model that way.

This is a perfect example. Sure this is designed, but by business
professionals. Just like engineers design trusses for bridges. This has
nothing to do with IxD or <Insert favorite UX acronym here> Design. And
again, I'm not saying that we have no input in business modelling. We should
influence it, but the final solution & accountability rests with business
professionals.

Todd, do you then agree that anyone can (UX) Design?

-Vishal

On Thu, Jun 18, 2009 at 5:43 PM, Todd Zaki Warfel <lists at toddwarfel.com>wrote:

>
> On Jun 18, 2009, at 12:20 PM, Vishal Iyer wrote:
>
> That does not make business models a part of design. On the contrary,
> design is a part of the business model.
>
>
> I fail to see how design can be a part of the business model w/o the
> business model being part of Design. Not taking into account the business
> model is a Design failure.
>
> I think Jared Spool's talk on the Amazon is a perfect example. The fact
> that Amazon is able to turn inventory 25 days faster than it's credit line,
> floating cash, making interest instead of paying interest is by Design. It's
> not an accident. It's by Design. They've designed their business model that
> way.
>
> In the case of Fever, the decision to make it $30 and whether or not to
> offer a demo is by design. Shaun designed the business model for Fever that
> way. He may have very good reason to do so, but it's still by design.
>
> So, exactly how is the business model not part of Design?
>
>
> Cheers!
>
> Todd Zaki Warfel
> Principal Design Researcher
> Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
> ----------------------------------
> *Contact Info*
> Voice: (215) 825-7423 Email: todd at messagefirst.com
> AIM: twarfel at mac.com
> Blog: http://toddwarfel.com <http://toddwarfel/>
> Twitter: zakiwarfel
> ----------------------------------
> In theory, theory and practice are the same.
> In practice, they are not.
>
>
>
>
>

--
-Vishal
http://www.vishaliyer.com

18 Jun 2009 - 5:45pm
Justin Maxwell
2009

This quickly becomes an issue of semantics, and I feel we're arguing
for the sake of hitting keys on a keyboard at this point.

If ixd is the shaping of all actions pertaining to a digital artifact
or process, the discussion about Fever must focus on the ways and
means by which a customer can acquire knowledge to inform a decision
in purchasing the software. It is clear through this discussion that
many feel software evaluation is a minimum requirement for acquiring
that knowledge. Since it is not afforded in the system selling the
software, regardless of business objective, I believe the discussion
is at home here...

On Jun 18, 2009, at 3:28 PM, Vishal Iyer wrote:

>> I think Jared Spool's talk on the Amazon is a perfect example. The
>> fact
> that Amazon is able to turn inventory 25 days > faster than it's
> credit
> line, floating cash, making interest instead of paying interest is by
> Design. It's not an accident. It's > by Design. They've designed their
> business model that way.
>
> This is a perfect example. Sure this is designed, but by business
> professionals. Just like engineers design trusses for bridges. This
> has
> nothing to do with IxD or <Insert favorite UX acronym here> Design.
> And
> again, I'm not saying that we have no input in business modelling.
> We should
> influence it, but the final solution & accountability rests with
> business
> professionals.
>
> Todd, do you then agree that anyone can (UX) Design?

18 Jun 2009 - 6:55pm
Phillip Hunter
2006

I don't usually like to jump into these frays, but two things about
this are near to my heart. 1) Successful business as a goal should
be a objective of good design; and 2) I really think these
"either/or" discussions are ridiculous.

To the first point, read Dreyfuss' Designing for People. A key
component of his design philosophy was that it must fit hand-in-glove
with the design method and deliverable. Any designer not learning the
business model, perhaps influencing it, then weaving it through the
design, all the while considering it and giving feedback on it, is
not doing his or her job. That should always be at least offered,
even if the client rejects the input. Do we really know that no
designer suggested anything influencing the Amazon business model?

Secondly, what is the point of arguing which is part of the other?
They both just *are*. They are intertwined, they affect each other.
They affect customers almost simultaneously, and often the design
first. But if they are not in sync, if they do not make sense
together, if they do not support each other, then there will be the
sorts of problems we are all familiar with. Do we know that Jeff
Bezos didn't have a nice chat with a designer one day and come away
with new ideas about making money?

Yes, business wizards can be better at a business model and design
wizards can be better at design. But a designer without business
sense comes close to the "artiste" or "pixel pusher" description.
Or, as they were called at an old company I worked for, specretaries.

Sure, there will be design opportunities for a business model that is
already fantastic and designed by non-UX people. But that is only an
opportunity for the designer to learn a business lesson and to show
their expertise at turning a business model into an effective design.
Conversely, I believe there are products and services that are
created and well-designed that are business model opportunities.

Phillip
http://www.design-outloud.com

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=42976

18 Jun 2009 - 7:30pm
Andrei Herasimchuk
2004

On Jun 18, 2009, at 3:45 PM, Justin Maxwell wrote:

> It is clear through this discussion that many feel software
> evaluation is a minimum requirement for acquiring that knowledge.
> Since it is not afforded in the system selling the software,
> regardless of business objective, I believe the discussion is at
> home here...

Who are these "many" you are referring to? At this point in time, I've
only heard one person complain on this point.

--
Andrei Herasimchuk

Chief Design Officer, Involution Studios
innovating the digital world

e. andrei at involutionstudios.com
c. +1 408 306 6422

19 Jun 2009 - 10:17am
Victor Lombardi
2003

fyi, the book "Business Model Generation" by Yves Pigneur and Alex
Osterwalder will be out soon (and chunck are available now as they
write it, due to their innovative publishing model :-). I've
attended two of Alex's workshops, and he explicitly uses design
principles and methods in how he describes and teaches business model
design, so anyone here interested in learning more about business
models may find the book a very friendly introduction...

http://bit.ly/i9As

Victor

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=42976

Syndicate content Get the feed