Your favorite "tour" on a website?

10 Aug 2009 - 9:47am
4 years ago
7 replies
581 reads
tdellaringa
2006

Good Morning,

We're working on a project that has a somewhat complex concept to get across
without using a lot of information. Based on testing we're finding out that
some kind of tour is the way to go to introduce our product to our
customers.

We've been looking at Mint.com as a real good example of a tour. I think
Campaign Monitor has a good one too. Do you know of any other sites that use
the "tour" really well? We'd like to look at as many good examples as
possible. Suggestions are appreciated!

Thanks!

Tom

Comments

10 Aug 2009 - 10:13am
William Hudson
2009

Tom -

Not a tour suggestion, but dynamic popup windows now make the
implementation of 'cue cards' a real possibility on the web. These help
to make the tour a little less necessary as they tell users what they
need to know when they arrive at a section of the site they have not
used before. When they don't need to see the cue card for a particular
page, they just close it (you need a small link to reinstate it if they
wish).

Cue cards had been used very successfully in desktop applications for
some time (by Inuit's Quickbooks and Quicken, for example). The
advantage they have over a tour is that tours are little like reading
the instructions. Unless you force people to take the tour (which is
advisable only if it is very short), many will try to start using the
site without it.

Just a thought...

Regards,

William

> -----Original Message-----
> From: new-bounces at ixda.org [mailto:new-bounces at ixda.org] On Behalf Of
> Tom Dell'Aringa
> Sent: 10 August 2009 8:48 AM
> To: discuss at ixda.org
> Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Your favorite "tour" on a website?
...

10 Aug 2009 - 10:20am
tdellaringa
2006

We discussed that approach a little bit. My concern about that is how do you
turn it off? If it based on a cookie, it comes back when they clear their
cookies. If it's a setting in their preferences, I suppose that works but
you need to make sure they find it. But really the main issue is that in our
case they need to get the value proposition up front first, or they kind of
go away.

So it's less about the how and more about the why. Why do I want to be a
part of this thing?

We're not going to force the tour, but it has to be right there so all I
have to do as a user is just click play, start or whatever to get it going.

On Mon, Aug 10, 2009 at 10:13 AM, William Hudson <
william.hudson at syntagm.co.uk> wrote:

>
> Not a tour suggestion, but dynamic popup windows now make the
> implementation of 'cue cards' a real possibility on the web.
>

10 Aug 2009 - 10:34am
William Hudson
2009

Tom -

I see your point, but I have been using the web since NCSA Mosaic and
have taken maybe three site tours in the intervening 15 years. Maybe
it's me. Anyone out there taken a site tour in the past 3 months?

Regards,

William

From: Tom Dell'Aringa [mailto:pixelmech at gmail.com]
Sent: 10 August 2009 4:20 PM
To: William Hudson
Cc: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Your favorite "tour" on a website?

We discussed that approach a little bit. My concern about that is how do
you turn it off? If it based on a cookie, it comes back when they clear
their cookies. If it's a setting in their preferences, I suppose that
works but you need to make sure they find it. But really the main issue
is that in our case they need to get the value proposition up front
first, or they kind of go away.

So it's less about the how and more about the why. Why do I want to be a
part of this thing?

We're not going to force the tour, but it has to be right there so all I
have to do as a user is just click play, start or whatever to get it
going.
On Mon, Aug 10, 2009 at 10:13 AM, William Hudson
<william.hudson at syntagm.co.uk> wrote:

Not a tour suggestion, but dynamic popup windows now make the
implementation of 'cue cards' a real possibility on the web.

10 Aug 2009 - 10:40am
tdellaringa
2006

I understand, but I do think that the kind of tour we're talking about is
somewhat of a new convention. If you haven't looked at Mint.com yet, give it
a look. It's not your typical tour.

We're faced with this problem in that if they don't get it fairly quickly,
they are gone. And our initial efforts with a typical web site to inform
them are failing badly. In testing, they have shown a good level of interest
in some kind of tour.

For myself, I've taken a few that have helped me. We purchased Axure for use
here because of their tour features.

Tom

On Mon, Aug 10, 2009 at 10:34 AM, William Hudson <
william.hudson at syntagm.co.uk> wrote:

> I see your point, but I have been using the web since NCSA Mosaic and
> have taken maybe three site tours in the intervening 15 years. Maybe it’s
> me. Anyone out there taken a site tour in the past 3 months?
>

10 Aug 2009 - 12:39pm
Sachin Saxena
2009

I like the tour of RedFin.
http://www.redfin.com/videos/how-buy-works

The best part is it always keeps you interested which in a way is a great achievement.

All the best.
S

10 Aug 2009 - 1:38pm
tdellaringa
2006

It's not only "Why use mint?" - I'd consider that secondary, it's really the
whole home page above the fold, with the links at the bottom. It explains
the whole value prop.

Tom

10 Aug 2009 - 1:52pm
neylano
2007

NPR did a cool one recently for our redesign. We used a company called Small Mammal.

It's on YouTube.

Callie Neylan / Senior Interactive Designer / NPR / cneylan at npr.org / 202 513 3672

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